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Friday, February 15, 2013

A Burning Lie: The Dorner-LAPD Saga!




February 15, 2013

Oakland, CA (WCJB)

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"Lying is the Norm!"


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Dorner's Manifesto
Continued Below


“Another Nigger fried. No big deal.”

-- April 16, 2011, Statement by New York City Police Officer Michael Daragjati, boasting of his false arrest of another African-American male.

Top News Story!

Murder in the Marines!

Published On: Mon, Jul 15th, 2013 - Updated On: Mon, Jul 22, 2013

 photo ex-Marine-Kevin-Cox-ex-Marines-Emyrs-John-and-Tyrone-Miller_zps59a0570e.jpg(Jury recommends ex-Marine Kevin Cox, left, should get life in prison and ex-Marines Emyrs John and Tyrone Miller should get the death penalty.)

Riverside, CA -- Newlyweds Marine Sgt. Jan Pietrzak and his wife Quiana Jenkins-Pietrzak (pictured above, center.) were found gagged, tied and shot in the head in their Riverside County home in October 2008. Three former Marines were convicted for torturing and killing the fellow Marine and his wife in 2008. Prosecutors alleged the execution-style slaying in Southern California was committed for money and was racially motivated. Racial slurs were painted on the walls and fires had been set to “destroy the evidence” but little else was reported. Sgt. Pietrzak, a helicopter airframe mechanic at MCAS Miramar near San Diego, was found bloody and beaten. His wife’s body was discovered naked. Officials say she had been sexually assaulted. All three men worked with Sgt. Pietrzak at one time while stationed at Camp Pendleton.

 photo Sgt-Jan-Pietrzak-and-his-wife-Quiana-Jenkins-Pietrzak_zps5a5e5029.jpg

Two separate juries convicted three defendants of murder. Former private Kevin Cox, 25, was first to learn his fate. “He was not the actual killer, he was not in my opinion a major participant obviously the jury disagreed with that assessment,” Cox’s attorney said. The attorney hopes jurors will consider Cox’s rank at the time of the murders when deliberating his punishment. “Because it was three armed Marines, two of whom outranked him and telling him we need to knock on these people’s door,” he said. The Jury recommended that ex-Marine Kevin Cox, (pictured above, left), should get life in prison. Cox's sealed fate was followed by the verdict being read by a second jury convicting former Lance Cpl. Emrys John, 23, and former Lance Cpl. Tyrone Miller, 25.

John was convicted of pulling the trigger. Miller was found guilty of murder and sexually-assaulting Quiana Jenkins-Pietrzak. The Jury recommended that ex-Marines Emyrs John and Tyrone Miller should get the death penalty.

A fourth suspect, former Lance Cpl. Kesaun Sykes of Fallbrook, had his case severed and is awaiting trial. Sykes was known as “Psycho” by fellow Marines.

Big Bear Manhunt!

Posted: 02/14/2013 05:56:34 PM PST - Updated: 02/14/2013 08:02:39 PM PST
“Fucking burn this motherfucker.” “Burn that fucking house down.”

-- February 12, 2013, Audio Recorded Statement by Law Enforcement Officer as they burn the cabin where ex-Cop Christopher Dorner was found to be holed up.

BIG BEAR LAKE, Calif. (WCJB) — Officials said Thursday that the burned remains found in a California mountain cabin have been positively identified as fugitive former police officer Christopher Dorner. Jodi Miller, a spokeswoman for the San Bernardino County sheriff-coroner, said the identification was made through Dorner's dental records. Miller did not give a cause of death. The cabin went up in flames after authorities launched pyrotechnic tear-gas canisters into it, and authorities were all but certain the charred body found inside afterward was Dorner's. They are waiting for forensic tests to confirm that, but in the meantime San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon (pictured left) said Wednesday that authorities consider the hunt over. Sheriff's deputies were not trying to burn down the cabin with Dorner inside but simply flush him out, McMahon said. "It was not on purpose," he told reporters Wednesday. "We did not intentionally burn down that cabin to get Mr. Dorner out."

Police audio from the Christopher Dorner siege reveals a deliberate plan to burn down the cabin in which Dorner was trapped, with one officer heard to say, “fucking burn this motherfucker,” before police discussed their intention to, “go ahead with the plan with the burners.”


“Alright, we’re gonna go ahead with the plan with the burners,” one officer says.

“Copy,” replies another.

“Like we talked about,” the first officer responds.

“The burners are deployed, and we have a fire,” says another officer moments later, before the police dispatcher repeats the statement.

Within minutes of the fire starting, police note that the cabin is “starting to collapse.”

Police are also heard discussing if they are ready to “bring fire”.

“Burners” is police slang for tear gas canisters, which are known to cause fires.

In a separate clip carried by a local news channel, police are heard to say, “Fucking burn this motherfucker,” and “burn that fucking house down.” This audio appears to be from earlier in the siege following the initial shootout between Dorner and cops. In another audio clip broadcast by Los Angeles media sources, police are heard saying, “get the gas, burn it down,” clearly indicating cops knew use of tear gas would set the cabin on fire.

Given the ammunition inside the cabin, LAPD officers knew that the tear gas would lead to a fire and instead of waiting it out, chose instead to carry out a summary execution. That’s not to excuse the actions of Dorner, but the fact that police now view burning people to death as a reasonable way to apprehend a suspect is shocking.
“get the gas, burn it down,”

-- February 12, 2013, Audio Recorded Statement by Law Enforcement Officer as they burn the cabin where ex-Cop Christopher Dorner was found to be holed up.
The manhunt brought police to Big Bear Lake, 80 miles east of Los Angeles, where they found Dorner's burned-out pickup truck abandoned. His footprints disappeared on frozen soil and hundreds of officers who searched the area and checked out each building failed to find him. Five days later, but just a stone's throw from a command post authorities had set up in the massive manhunt, Karen and Jim Reynolds said they came face to face with Dorner inside their cabin-style condo. The couple said Dorner bound them and put pillowcases on their heads. At one point, he explained that he had been there for days. "He said 'I don't have a problem with you, so I'm not going to hurt you,'" Jim Reynolds said. "I didn't believe him; I thought he was going to kill us."

The Reynolds said Dorner was upstairs in the rental unit Tuesday when they arrived to ready it for vacationers. Dorner, who at the time was being sought for three killings, confronted the Reynolds with a drawn gun, "jumped out and hollered 'stay calm,'" Jim Reynolds said during a Wednesday night news conference. His wife screamed and ran downstairs but Dorner caught her, Reynolds said. The couple said they were taken to a bedroom where he ordered them to lie on a bed and then on the floor. Dorner bound their arms and legs with plastic ties, gagged them with towels and covered their heads with pillowcases. "I really thought it could be the end," Karen Reynolds said.

The couple believes Dorner had been staying in the cabin at least since Feb. 8, the day after his burned truck was found nearby. Dorner told them he had been watching them by day from inside the cabin as they did work outside. The couple, who live nearby, only entered the unit Tuesday. "He said we are very hard workers," Karen Reynolds said. After he fled in their purple Nissan Rogue, she managed to call 911 from a cellphone on the coffee table. Police said Dorner later killed a fourth person, a sheriff's deputy, during a standoff, and died inside the burning cabin where he took cover during a blazing shootout.

Police have not commented on the Reynolds' account, but it renews questions about the thoroughness of a search for a man who authorities declared was armed and extremely dangerous as they hunted him across the Southwest and Mexico. "They said they went door-to-door but then he's right there under their noses. Makes you wonder if the police even knew what they were doing," resident Shannon Schroepfer said. "He was probably sitting there laughing at them the whole time." In many cases, officers didn't even knock on the doors, according to searchers and residents.

The notion of him holed up just across the street from the command post was shocking to many, but not totally surprising to some experts familiar with the complications of such a manhunt. "Chilling. That's the only word I could use for that," said Ed Tatosian, a retired SWAT commander for the Sacramento Police Department. "It's not an unfathomable oversight. We're human. It happens. It's chilling (that) it does happen." Law enforcement officers, who had gathered outside daily for briefings, were stunned by the revelation. One official later looking on Google Earth exclaimed that he'd parked right across the street from the Reynolds' cabin each day.

Timothy Clemente, a retired FBI SWAT team leader who was part of the search for Atlanta Olympics bomber Eric Rudolph, said searchers had to work methodically. When there's a hot pursuit, they can run after a suspect into a building. But in a manhunt, the search has to slow down. "You can't just kick in every door," he said. Police have to have a reason to enter a building.

Officers would have been approaching each cabin, rock and tree with the prospect that Dorner was behind and waiting with a weapon that could penetrate bulletproof vests. In his manifesto posted online, Dorner, a former Navy reservist, said he had no fear of losing his life and would wage "unconventional and asymmetrical warfare" and warned officers "you will now live the life of the prey."

Even peering through windows can be difficult because officers have to remove a hand from their weapons to shade their eyes. Experts said it is likely officers may have used binoculars to help examine homes from a distance, especially when dealing with a man who had already killed three people, including a police officer. "If Chris Dorner's on the other side of the door, what would the response be?" Clemente said. "A .50 caliber round or .223 round straight through that door."
“Burn that fucking house down.”

-- February 12, 2013, Audio Recorded Statement by Law Enforcement Officer as they burn the cabin where ex-Cop Christopher Dorner was found to be holed up.

Posted: 02/13/2013 04:59:34 PM PST - Updated: 02/13/2013 07:46:39 PM PST

BIG BEAR LAKE, Calif. -- Police scoured mountain peaks for days, using everything from bloodhounds to high-tech helicopters in their manhunt for a revenge-seeking ex-cop. They had no idea he was hiding among them, holed up in a vacation cabin across the street from their command post. It was there that Christopher Dorner apparently took refuge last Thursday, four days after beginning a deadly rampage that would claim four lives. The apparent end came very close to where his trail went cold six days earlier when his burning pickup truck -- with guns and camping gear inside -- was abandoned with a broken axle on a fire road in the San Bernardino National Forest near the ski resort town of Big Bear Lake. His footprints led away from the truck and vanished on frozen soil.

The search ended Tuesday when a man believed to be Dorner bolted from hiding, stole two cars, barricaded himself in a vacant cabin and mounted a last stand in a furious shootout in which he killed one sheriff's deputy and wounded another before the building erupted in flames. He never emerged from the ruins and hours later a charred body was found in the basement of the burned cabin along with a wallet and personal items, including a California driver's license with the name Christopher Dorner, an official briefed on the investigation told media sources on condition of anonymity because of the ongoing investigation. Authorities believe the remains are those of the former Los Angeles police officer, but they have not been formally identified. Dorner, 33, had said in a lengthy rant police believe he posted on Facebook that he expected to die in one final, violent confrontation with police, and if it was him in the cabin that's just what happened.
"They are representative of the sacrifices and that quiet courage that exists among law enforcement officers all across the country and their families."

-- May 12, 2012, Statement by Barack Obama in a White House Rose Garden ceremony to honor the National Association of Police Organizations (NAPO).


Just a few hours after police announced Tuesday that they had fielded more than 1,000 tips with no sign of Dorner, word came that a man matching his description had tied up two people in a Big Bear Lake cabin, stole their car and fled. Authorities didn't immediately give more details on the two people. Jay Hylton told media sources that they were two of his relatives, a mother and daughter pair of housekeepers, who weren't hurt. Los Angeles media sources reported the women surprised Dorner Tuesday, he tied them up and then fled in a purple Nissan. The sources reported that one maid eventually broke free and called 911.

Game wardens from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife who were part of the search detail spotted the purple Nissan that had been reported stolen going in the opposite direction and gave chase, department spokesman Lt. Patrick Foy said. The driver looked like Dorner. They lost the purple car after it passed a school bus and turned onto a side road, but two other Fish and Wildlife patrols turned up that road a short time later, and were searching for the car when a white pickup truck sped erratically toward the wardens. "He took a close look at the driver and realized it was the suspect," Foy said. Dorner, who allegedly stole the pickup truck at gunpoint after crashing the first car, rolled down a window and opened fire on the wardens, striking a warden's truck more than a dozen times.

One of the wardens shot at the suspect as he rounded a curve in the road. It's unclear if he hit him, but the stolen pickup careened off the road and crashed in a snow bank. Dorner then ran to the cabin where he barricaded himself and got in a shootout with San Bernardino County sheriff's deputies and other officers, two of whom were shot, one fatally. A SWAT team surrounded the cabin and used an armored vehicle to break out the cabin windows, said a law enforcement official who requested anonymity because the investigation was ongoing. The officers then lobbed tear gas canisters into the cabin and blasted a message over a loudspeaker: "Surrender or come out." The armored vehicle then tore down each of the cabin's four walls. A single shot was heard inside before the cabin was engulfed in flames, the law enforcement official told media sources.

A San Bernardino County sheriff's deputy killed in a shootout with the man believed to be fugitive former LAPD officer Chris Dorner had gone into the search happy to help his community but wary of the dangers. San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon identified the deputy Wednesday as Jeremiah MacKay, a man who grew up in the area and followed his father into public service. MacKay suffered multiple gunshot wounds Tuesday and was transported to Loma Linda Hospital where he died of his injuries. He was 35. MacKay was a detective who had been with the department for 15 years. Another deputy, Alex Collins, was also hit by gunfire and remained hospitalized Wednesday after undergoing multiple surgeries. He was expected to make a full recovery, McMahon said.

Ron Erickson, whose house is only about quarter mile away, said officers interrogated him to make sure he wasn't being held hostage. Erickson himself had been keeping a nervous watch on his neighborhood, but he never saw the hulking Dorner. "I looked at all the cabins that backed the national forest and I just didn't think to look at the one across from the command post," he said. "It didn't cross my mind. It just didn't." Even door-to-door searches failed to turn up any trace of him in the quiet, bucolic neighborhood where children were playing in the snow Tuesday night. With a description of his car broadcast all over the Southwest and Mexico, he managed to get to the mountains 80 miles east of Los Angeles where his burning truck was found. Only a short distance from the truck, he spent his final days with a front-row seat to the search mobilized right outside. With many searchers leaving town amid speculation he was long gone, the command center across the street was taken down Monday.

LAPD Lt. Andrew Neiman said Wednesday the department has returned to normal patrol operations. He said approximately a dozen of the more than 50 protective details remain in place and will stay that way until the remains are positively identified. "This really is not a celebration," he said. Neiman would not answer any questions regarding what occurred in San Bernardino County, saying it was that jurisdiction's investigation. Neiman said LAPD officers used the Internet to monitor radio chatter during the firefight. "It was horrifying to listen to that firefight and to hear those words. 'Officer down' is the most gut-wrenching experience that you can have as a police officer."

Posted: February 12, 2013 - Updated at 11:55 PM PST

BIG BEAR LAKE, Calif. -- The manhunt for the former Los Angeles police officer suspected of going on a killing spree converged Tuesday on a mountain cabin where authorities believe he barricaded himself inside, engaged in a shootout that killed a deputy and then never emerged as the home went up in flames. A single gunshot was heard from within. If the body of Christopher Dorner is found inside, as authorities suspect, the search for the most wanted man in America over the last week would have ended the way he had expected - death, with the police pursuing him.

Thousands of officers had been on the hunt for the former Navy reservist since police said he launched a campaign to exact revenge against the Los Angeles Police Department for his firing. "Enough is enough. It's time for you to turn yourself in. It's time to stop the bloodshed," LAPD Cmdr. Andrew Smith said at a news conference held outside police headquarters in Los Angeles. A short time after Smith spoke Tuesday, smoke began to rise from the cabin in the snow-covered woods near Big Bear Lake, a resort town about 80 miles east of Los Angeles. Flames then engulfed the building - images that were broadcast on live television around the world. TV helicopters showed the fire burning freely with no apparent effort to extinguish it.


"We have reason to believe that it is him," said San Bernardino County sheriff's spokeswoman Cynthia Bachman, adding that she didn't know how the fire started. She noted there was gunfire between the person in the cabin and officers around the home before the blaze began.

Until Tuesday, authorities didn't know whether Dorner was still near Big Bear Lake, where they found his burned-out pickup last week. Around 12:20 p.m. Tuesday, deputies got a report of a stolen pickup truck, authorities said. The location was directly across the street from where law enforcement set up their command post on Thursday and not far from where Dorner's pickup was abandoned. The owner of the vehicle taken Tuesday described the suspect as looking similar to Dorner. A warden for the California Department of Fish and Wildlife traveling down Highway 38 recognized a man who fit Dorner's description traveling in the opposite direction. The officer pursued the vehicle and there was a shooting at 12:42 p.m. in which the wildlife vehicle was hit numerous times and the suspect escaped on foot after crashing his truck.

After holing up in the cabin, there was a second gunbattle with San Bernardino County deputies, two of whom were shot. One died and the other was expected to live after undergoing surgery. A SWAT team surrounded the cabin and used an armored vehicle to break out the cabin windows, the official said. The officers then pumped a gas into the cabin and blasted a message over a loudspeaker: "Surrender or come out." The armored vehicle then tore down each of the cabin's four walls, like peeling back the layers of an onion, the official said. The man believed to be Dorner never came out of the cabin, and a single shot was heard inside before the cabin was engulfed in flames, a law enforcement official told media sources. The official later told the source that a charred body was found in the burned cabin and reiterated that even after Los Angeles and San Bernardino authorities disputed it in news conferences. The official requested anonymity because of the ongoing investigation.

Updated at 04:12 PM PST


BIG BEAR, Calif. -- A man police believe to be the fugitive ex-Los Angeles officer wanted in three killings was barricaded inside a burning cabin Tuesday after a shootout in a California mountain town that left one deputy dead and another wounded. The developments raised the possibility that the nearly week-old hunt for America's most wanted man might be coming to an end. The cabin was on fire and smoke was coming from the structure in the late afternoon after police surrounded it in the snow-covered woods of Big Bear, a resort town about 80 miles east of Los Angeles. Authorities have focused their hunt for Christopher Dorner there since they said he launched a campaign to exact revenge against the Los Angeles Police Department for his firing. Helicopters using heat-seeking technology searched the forest from above while scores of officers, some using bloodhounds, scoured the ground and checked hundreds of vacation cabins - many vacant this time of year - in the area. A snowstorm hindered the search and may have helped cover his tracks, though authorities were hopeful he would leave fresh footprints if hiding in the wilderness.

Authorities say Dorner threatened to bring "warfare" to LAPD officers and their families, spreading fear and setting off a search for him across three states and Mexico. Until Tuesday, authorities didn't know whether he was still near Big Bear, where they found his burned-out pickup last week. Police found charred weapons and camping gear inside the truck in Big Bear. If the man inside the cabin does prove to be Dorner, it will both lower tensions among the more than 40 targets police say he listed in an online rant. It would also raise them for law enforcement officers who are engaged in a standoff with a former Navy reservist who has warned that he knows their tactics as well as they do.

"Enough is enough. It's time for you to turn yourself in. It's time to stop the bloodshed," LAPD Cmdr. Andrew Smith said earlier in the day at a news conference held outside police headquarters in Los Angeles, a starkly different atmosphere than last week when officials briefed the news media under tight security with Dorner on the loose.

Police say Dorner began his run on Feb. 6 after they connected the slayings of a former police captain's daughter and her fiance with an angry Facebook rant they said he posted. Threats against the LAPD led officials to assign officers to protect officers and their families. Within hours of the release of photos of the 6-foot, 270-pounder described as armed and "extremely dangerous," police say, Dorner unsuccessfully tried to steal a boat in San Diego to flee to Mexico and then ambushed police in Riverside County, shooting three and killing one.

Around 12:20 p.m. Tuesday, deputies got a report of a stolen vehicle, authorities said. The location was directly across the street from where law enforcement set up their command post on Thursday and not far from where Dorner's burned-out pickup was abandoned. The people whose vehicle was stolen described the suspect as looking similar to Dorner. When authorities found the vehicle, the suspect ran into the forest and barricaded himself inside a cabin.

U.S. Forest Service spokesman John Miller said the first exchange of gunfire involved state Fish and Wildlife wardens at 12:42 p.m., and then there was a second exchange with San Bernardino County sheriff's deputies, two of whom were shot.

Dorner's anger with the department dated back at least five years, when he was fired for filing a false report accusing his training officer of kicking a mentally ill suspect. Dorner, who is black, claimed in the rant that he was the subject of racism by the department and fired for doing the right thing. He said he would get even with those who wronged him as part of his plan to reclaim his good name. "You're going to see what a whistleblower can do when you take everything from him especially his NAME!!!" the rant said. "You have awoken a sleeping giant." Dorner served in the Navy, earning a rifle marksman ribbon and pistol expert medal. He was assigned to a naval undersea warfare unit and various aviation training units, according to military records. He took leave from the LAPD for a six-month deployment to Bahrain in 2006 and 2007.

One of the targets listed in the manifesto was former LAPD Capt. Randal Quan, who represented Dorner before the disciplinary board. Dorner claimed he put the interests of the department above his. The first victims were Quan's daughter, Monica Quan, 28, a college basketball coach, and her fiance, Keith Lawrence, 27. They were shot multiple times in their car in a parking garage near their condo. Jumpy officers guarding one of the targets named in the rant in Torrance on Thursday shot and injured two women delivering newspapers because they mistook their pickup truck for Dorner's.

Chief Charlie Beck, who initially dismissed the allegations in the rant, said he would reopen the investigation into his firing - not to appease the ex-officer, but to restore confidence in the black community, which long had a fractured relationship with police that has improved in recent years.

Dorner's Manifesto
Continued ...


I ask that all journalist investigating this story submit request for FOIA with the LAPD to gain access to the BOR transcripts which occurred from 10/08 to 2/09. There, you will see that a video was played for the BOR members of Mr. ----- who suffers from Schizophrenia and Dementia stating that he was kicked by a female officer. That video evidence supports my claim that ----- kicked him twice in the upper body and once in the face. I would like all journalist to also request copies of all reports that I had written while employed by LAPD. Whether in the academy, or during my 3 years as a police officer. There are DR#'s attached to each report (investigative report) that I have ever written so they all exist. A FOIA request will most likely be needed to access these at Parker center or at the Personnel/Records. Judge my writin/grammar skills for yourself. The department attempted to paint me as an officer who could not write reports. Even though Sgt. ----- a training officer who trained me stated for the BOR panel that there was nothing wrong with my report writing and that I was better than all rookie/probationer officers he has ever trained. Officer ----- stated the same but refused to testify as he did not want to "get involved" with the BOR's. Contact Sgt. -----,(now a Captain at Lompoc PD), Sgt. -----, and Sgt. -----. All will state that my report writing was impeccable. I will tell you this, I always type my reports because I have messy handwriting/penmanship. I never had a single kickback/redlined report at Southwest division and Sgt. ----- and Sgt. ----- can testify to that. I never received an UNSATISFACTORY on any day or week. The same can be said within the U.S. Naval Reserves. All commanders will state that my report writing was always clear, concise, and impeccable. Even search my AAR (after action reports),chits, Memorandum's, IIR's (Intelligence Information Reports) which were written in the Navy. All were pristine.

I had worked patrol at LAPD's Harbor Division from 2/06 until 7/06 when I was involuntarily recalled back to active duty (US Navy) for a 12 month mobilization/deployment to Centcom in support of OIF/OEF. I returned back to LAPD's Harbor division on 7/07 and immediately returned to patrol. I worked at Harbor division until 11/07 where I then transferred to Southwest Division. I worked At Southwest division until 6/25/08 when I was relieved of duty.

I have exhausted all available means at obtaining my name back. I have attempted all legal court efforts within appeals at the Superior Courts and California Appellate courts. This is my last resort. The LAPD has suppressed the truth and it has now lead to deadly consequences. The LAPD's actions have cost me my law enforcement career that began on 2/7/05 and ended on 1/2/09. They cost me my Naval career which started on 4/02 and ends on 2/13. I had a TS/SCI clearance(Top Secret Sensitive Compartmentalized Information clearance) up until shortly after my termination with LAPD. This is the highest clearance a service member can attain other than a Yankee White TS/SCI which is only granted for those working with and around the President/Vice President of the United States. I lost my position as a Commanding Officer of a Naval Security Forces reserve unit at NAS Fallon because of the LAPD. I've lost a relationship with my mother and sister because of the LAPD. I've lost a relationship with close friends because of the LAPD. In essence, I've lost everything because the LAPD took my name and new I was INNOCENT!!! -----, -----, -----,----- and ----- all new I was innocent but decided to terminate me so they could continue Ofcr. -----. I know about the meeting between all of you where ----- attorney, -----, confessed that she kicked ----- (excessive force). Your day has come.

I'm not an aspiring rapper, I'm not a gang member, I'm not a dope dealer, I don't have multiple babies momma's. I am an American by choice, I am a son, I am a brother, I am a military service member, I am a man who has lost complete faith in the system, when the system betrayed, slandered, and libeled me. I lived a good life and though not a religious man I always stuck to my own personal code of ethics, ethos and always stuck to my shoreline and true North. I didn't need the US Navy to instill Honor, Courage, and Commitment in me but I thank them for re-enforcing it. It's in my DNA.

Luckily I don't have to live everyday like most of you. Concerned if the misconduct you were apart of is going to be discovered. Looking over your shoulder, scurrying at every phone call from internal affairs or from the Captains office wondering if that is the day PSB comes after you for the suspects you struck when they were cuffed months/years ago or that $500 you pocketed from the narcotics dealer, or when the other guys on your watch beat a transient nearly to death and you never reported the UOF to the supervisor. No, I don't have that concern, I stood up for what was right but unfortunately have dealt with the reprocussions of doing the right thing and now losing my name and everything I ever stood for. You fuckers knew ----- was guilty of kicking (excessive force) ----- and you did nothing but get rid of what you saw as the problem, the whistleblower. ----- himself stated on video tape ( provided for the BOR and in transcripts) he was kicked and even his father stated that his son said he was kicked by ----- when he was released from custody. The video was played for the entire BOR to hear. You're going to see what a whistleblower can do when you take everything from him especially his NAME!!!

Look what you did to Sgt. ----- (now lieutenant) when he exposed the truth of your lying, racism, and PSB cover-ups to frame and convict an innocent man. You can not police yourselves and the consent decree was unsuccessful. Sgt. -----, I met you on the range several times as a recruit and as an officer. You're a good man and I saw it in your eyes an actions.

Self Preservation is no longer important to me. I do not fear death as I died long ago on 1/2/09. I was told by my mother that sometimes bad things happen to good people. I refuse to accept that.

From 2/05 to 1/09 I saw some of the most vile things humans can inflict on others as a police officer in Los Angeles. Unfortunately, it wasn't in the streets of LA. It was in the confounds of LAPD police stations and shops (cruisers). The enemy combatants in LA are not the citizens and suspects, it's the police officers.

People who live in glass houses should not throw stones. How ironic that you utilize a fixed glass structure as your command HQ. You use as a luminous building to symbolize that you are transparent, have nothing to hide, or suppress when in essence, concealing, omitting, and obscuring is your forte.

-----, this is when you need to have that come to Jesus talk with Sgt. ----- and everyone else who was involved in the conspiracy to have me terminated for doing the right thing. you also need to speak with her attorney, -----, and his conversation with the BOR members and her confession of guilt in kicking Mr. -----. I'll be waiting for a PUBLIC response at a press conference. When the truth comes out, the killing stops.

Why didn't you charge me with filing a false police report when I came forward stating that ----- kicked Mr. -----? You file criminal charges against every other officer who is accused and terminated for filing a false police report. You didn't because you knew I was innocent and a criminal court would find me innocent and expose your department for suppressing the truth and retaliation, that's why.

The attacks will stop when the department states the truth about my innocence, PUBLICLY!!! I will not accept any type of currency/goods in exchange for the attacks to stop, nor do i want it. I want my name back, period. There is no negotiation. I am not the state department who states they do not negotiate with terrorist, because anybody with a Secret or TS/SCI has seen IIR's on SIPR and knows that the US state department always negotiates by using CF countries or independent sovereign/neutral country to mediate and compromising.

This department has not changed from the ----- and ----- days. Those officers are still employed and have all promoted to Command staff and supervisory positions. I will correct this error. Are you aware that an officer (a rookie/probationer at the time) seen on the Rodney King videotape striking Mr. King multiple times with a baton on 3/3/91 is still employed by the LAPD and is now a Captain on the police department? Captain ----- is now the commanding officer of a LAPD police station (West LA division). As a commanding officer, he is now responsible for over 200 officers. Do you trust him to enforce department policy and investigate use of force investigations on arrestees by his officers? Are you aware ----- has since promoted to Sergeant after kicking Mr. ----- in the face. Oh, you Violated a citizens civil rights? We will promote you. Same as LAPD did with the officers from Metro involved in the May Day melee at MacArthur Park. They promoted them to Sergeant (a supervisor role).

No one is saying you can't be prejudiced or a bigot. We are all human and hold prejudices. If you state that you don't have prejudices, your lying! But, when you act on it and victimize innocent citizens and fellow innocen[t] officers, than that is a concern.

For you officers who do the job in the name of JUSTICE, those of you who lost honest officers to this event, look at the name of those on the BOR and the investigating officers from PSB and ----- and ask them, how come you couldn't tell the truth? Why did you terminate an honest officer and cover for a dishonest officer who victimized a mentally ill citizen.

Sometimes humans feel a need to prove they are the dominant race of a species and they inadvertently take kindness for weakness from another individual. You chose wrong.

Terminating officers because they expose a culture of lying, racism (from the academy), and excessive use of force will immediately change. PSB can not police their own and that has been proven. The blue line will forever be severed and a cultural change will be implanted. You have awoken a sleeping giant.

I am here to change and make policy. The culture of LAPD versus the community and honest/good officers needs to and will change. I am here to correct and calibrate your morale compasses to true north.

Those Caucasian officers who join South Bureau divisions (77 th,SW,SE, an Harbor) with the sole intent to victimize minorities who are uneducated, and unaware of criminal law, civil law, and civil rights. You prefer the South bureau because a use of force/deadly force is likely and the individual you use UOF on will likely not report it. You are a high value target.

Those Black officers in supervisory ranks and pay grades who stay in south bureau (even though you live in the valley or OC) for the sole intent of getting retribution toward subordinate caucasians officers for the pain and hostile work environment their elders inflicted on you as probationers (P-1 s) and novice P-2's. You are a high value target. You perpetuated the cycle of racism in the department as well. You breed a new generation of bigoted caucasian officer when you belittle them and treat them unfairly.

Those Hispanic officers who victimize their own ethnicity because they are new immigrants to this country and are unaware of their civil rights. You call them wetbacks to their face and demean them in front of fellow officers of different ethnicities so that you will receive some sort of acceptance from your colleagues. I'm not impressed. Most likely, your parents or grandparents were immigrants at one time, but you have forgotten that. You are a high value target.

Those lesbian officers in supervising positions who go to work, day in day out, with the sole intent of attempting to prove your misandrist authority (not feminism) to degrade male officers. You are a high value target.

Those Asian officers who stand by and observe everything I previously mentioned other officers participate in on a daily basis but you say nothing, stand for nothing and protect nothing. Why? Because of your usual saying, " I--don't like conflict". You are a high value target as well.


Those of you who "go along to get along" have no backbone and destroy the foundation of courage. You are the enablers of those who are guilty of misconduct. You are just as guilty as those who break the code of ethics and oath you swore.

Citizens/non-combatants, do not render medical aid to downed officers/enemy combatants. They would not do the same for you. They will let you bleed out just so they can brag to other officers that they had a 187 caper the other day and can't wait to accrue the overtime in future court subpoenas. As they always say, "that's the paramedics job-not mine". Let the balance of loss of life take place. Sometimes a reset needs to occur.

It is endless the amount of times per week officers arrest an individual, label him a suspect-arrestee-defendant and then before arraignment or trial realize that he is innocent based on evidence. You know what they say when they realize an innocent man just had his life turned upside down?. "I guess he should have stayed at home that day he was discovered walking down the street and matching the suspects description. Oh well, he appeared to be a dirtbag anyways". Meanwhile the falsely accused is left to pick up his life, get a new, family, friends, and sense of self worth.

Don't honor these fallen officers/dirtbags. When your family members die, they just see you as extra overtime at a crime scene and at a perimeter. Why would you value their lives when they clearly don't value yours or your family members lives? I've heard many officers who state they see dead victims as ATV's, Waverunners, RV's and new clothes for their kids. Why would you shed a tear for them when they in return crack a smile for your loss because of the impending extra money they will receive in their next paycheck for sitting at your loved ones crime scene of 6 hours because of the overtime they will accrue. They take photos of your loved ones recently deceased bodies with their cellphones and play a game of who has the most graphic dead body of the night with officers from other divisions. This isn't just the 20 something year old officers, this is the 50 year old officers with significant time on the job as well who participate.


You allow an officer, -----, to attempt to hack into my credit union account and still remain on the job even when Det. ----- shows the evidence that the IP address (provided by LAPFCU) that attempted to hack into my account and change my username and password leads directly to her residence. You even allow this visibly disgusting looking officer to stay on the job when she perjures (lies) in court (Clark County Family Court) to the judge's face and denies hacking into my personal credit union online account when I attempted to get my restraint order extended. Det. ----- provided the evidence and you still do nothing.

How do you know when a police officer is lying??? When he begins his sentence with, "based on my experience and training".

No one grows up and wants to be a cop killer. It was against everything I've ever was. As a young police explorer I found my calling in life. But, As a young police officer I found that the violent suspects on the street are not the only people you have to watch. It is the officer who was hired on to the department (pre-2000) before polygraphs were standard for all new hires and a substantial vetting in a backround investigation.

To those children of the officers who are eradicated, your parent was not the individual you thought they were. As you get older,you will see the evidence that your parent was a tyrant who loss their ethos and instead followed the path of moral corruptness. They conspired to hide and suppress the truth of misconduct on others behalf's. Your parent will have a name and plaque on the fallen officers memorial in D.C. But, In all honesty, your parents name will be a reminder to other officers to maintain the oath they swore and to stay along the shoreline that has guided them from childhood to that of a local, state, or federal law enforcement officer.

Your lack of ethics and conspiring to wrong a just individual are over.

Suppressing the truth will leave to deadly consequences for you and your family. There will be an element of surprise where you work, live, eat, and sleep. I will utilize ISR at your home, workplace, and all locations in between. I will utilize OSINT to discover your residences, spouses workplaces, and children's schools. IMINT to coordinate and plan attacks on your fixed locations. Its amazing whats on NIPR. HUMINT will be utilized to collect personal schedules of targets. I never had the opportunity to have a family of my own, I'm terminating yours. -----, -----, -----, and BOR members Look your wives/husbands and surviving children directly in the face and tell them the truth as to why your children are dead.

Never allow a LAPPL union attorney to be a retired LAPD Captain,(-----). He doesn't work for you, your interest, or your name. He works for the department, period. His job is to protect the department from civil lawsuits being filed and their best interest which is the almighty dollar. His loyalty is to the department, not his client. Even when he knowingly knows your innocent and the BOR also knows your innocent after ----- stated on videotape that he was kicked and ----- attorney confessed to the BOR off the record that she kicked -----.

The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants-TJ. This quote is not directed toward the US government which I fully support 100%. This is toward the LAPD who can not monitor itself. The consent decree should not have been lifted, ever.

I know your TTP's, (techniques, tactics, and procedures). Any threat assessments you generate will be useless. This is simple, I know your TTP's and PPR's. I will mitigate any of your attempts at preservation. ORM is my friend. I will mitigate all risks, threats and hazards. I assure you that Incident Command Posts will be target rich environments. KMA-367 license plate frames are great target indicators and make target selection even easier.

I will conduct DA operations to destroy, exploit and seize designated targets. If unsuccessful or unable to meet objectives in these initial small-scale offensive actions, I will reassess my BDA and re-attack until objectives are met. I have nothing to lose. My personal casualty means nothing. Just alike AAF's, ACM's, and AIF's, you can not prevail against an enemy combatant who has no fear of death. An enemy who embraces death is a lose, lose situation for their enemy combatants.

Hopefully you analyst have done your homework. You are aware that I have always been the top shot, highest score, an expert in rifle qualifications in every unit I've been in. I will utilize every bit of small arms training, demolition, ordnance, and survival training I've been given.

Do you know why we are unsuccessful in asymmetrical and guerrilla warfare in CENTCOM theatre of operations? I'll tell you. It's not the inefficiency of our combatant commanders, planning, readiness or training of troops. Much like the Vietnam war, ACM, AAF, foreign fighters, Jihadist, and JAM have nothing to lose. They embrace death as it is a way of life. I simply don't fear it. I am the walking exigent circumstance you created.

The Violence of action will be HIGH. I am the reason TAC alert was established. I will bring unconventional and asymmetrical warfare to those in LAPD uniform whether on or off duty. ISR is my strength and your weakness. You will now live the life of the prey. Your RD's and homes away from work will be my AO and battle space. I will utilize every tool within INT collections that I learned from NMITC in Dam Neck. You have misjudged a sleeping giant. There is no conventional threat assessment for me. JAM, New Ba'ath party, 1920 rev BGE, ACM, AAF, AQAP, AQIM and AQIZ have nothing on me. Do not deploy airships or gunships. SA-7 Manpads will be waiting. As you know I also own Barrett .50 s so your APC are defunct and futile.

You better have all your officers radio/phone muster (code 1) on or off duty every hour, on the hour.

Do not attempt to shadow or conduct any type of ISR on me. I have the inventory listing of all UC vehicles at Piper Tech and the home addresses of any INT analyst at JRIC and detachment locations. My POA is always POI and always true. This will be a war of attrition and a Pyrrhic and Camdean Victory for myself. You may have the resources and manpower but you are reactive and predictable in your op plans and TTP's. I have the strength and benefits of being unpredictable, unconventional, and unforgiving. Do not waste your time with briefs and tabletops.


Coin Toss!


In addition to posting his manifesto online, Dorner reached out directly to CNN, mailing a parcel to AC360 anchor Anderson Cooper's office at CNN in New York. The package arrived on February 1 and was opened by Cooper's assistant. Inside was a hand-labeled DVD, accompanied by a yellow Post-it note reading, in part, "I never lied" -- apparently in reference to his 2008 dismissal from the LAPD. The package also contained a coin wrapped in duct tape. The tape bears the hand-written inscription: "Thanks, but no thanks, Will Bratton." It also had letters that may be read as "IMOA", which could be a commonly used Internet abbreviation for "Imagine a More Open America," or possibly "1 MOA," which means one minute of angle, perhaps implying Dorner was notably accurate with a firearm. The coin is a souvenir medallion from former LAPD Chief William Bratton, of a type often given out as keepsakes. This one, though, was shot through with bullet holes: three bullet holes to the center and another shot nicked off the top.

The editorial staff of AC360 and CNN management were made aware of the package Thursday. Upon learning of its existence, they alerted Bratton and law enforcement. Anderson Cooper, who Dorner urged in his manifesto to "keep up the great work," said on Twitter that Dorner had mailed a package to him that contained a note, DVD and a "coin shot thru with bullet holes."

Public Policy in Effect!


Institutionalized Racism!


LONG BEACH, CA -- The saga of accused cop killer Christopher Jordan Dorner and his claims of racism and corruption in the Los Angeles Police Department has brought racial issues back into public discourse. The Rev. Napolean Goshay, a retired Compton police officer and current pastor with the Bethel Christian Methodist Episcopal Church in Long Beach, said Dorner's allegations about his training officer's assault on a homeless man sounded plausible and he wouldn't fault Dorner for reporting it. However, that was no excuse for what followed. "I don't think black folks are supportive of his actions, but they can see how he got there," Goshay said. "Right or wrong, they can see how he got there." As a police officer, Goshay said he had confrontations with white officers over their abuse of black suspects and could see how Dorner may have been mistreated.

The resonance of some of Dorner's allegations that race and corruption played a role in his dismissal from the police led Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck to promise to take another look at Dorner's case. "I'm not doing this to appease him. I'm doing this so the community has faith in what the Police Department does," Beck said in a Saturday television interview. Beck also acknowledged the racial component in the Dorner story. "This has caused so many people to be concerned about a Police Department that had made significant strides in communities of color," Beck said. "I want to make sure we don't undo that."

On Facebook, a half dozen pages have popped up with Dorner's face on them. A page called "Chris Dorner and the Revolution" has been created. As of Monday, that Facebook page had more than 750 "likes" and extensive discussions. Also, a Christopher Dorner fan page with more than 1,300 followers, and on another Dorner page there is a petition to President Barack Obama for a Dorner pardon.

Public Policy in Effect!


Police Protocol!

Posted: 02/13/2013 02:42:19 PM PST - Updated: 02/13/2013 05:12:27 PM PST

BERKELEY, CA -- The Alameda County coroner is investigating after a 41-year-old man died while being taken into police custody for an involuntary psychiatric hold Tuesday night, officials said Wednesday. Police said they responded to a call just before midnight about a person who may have been having mental health issues at an apartment building in the 2100 block of Allston Way. When police attempted to talk to the man, he became "agitated and uncooperative to the officer's verbal commands and began to scream and violently resist," according to a statement from Berkeley police. A struggle ensued, police said, and they were able to place the man in restraints, but he continued to kick and scream. After being loaded onto an ambulance gurney, police said they noticed he was not breathing, and they began CPR. He was taken to a hospital and pronounced dead, police said.

Police did not identify the man, and Sgt. Patricia Wilson of the coroner's office said the Berkeley Police Department has a hold on the case. Police said the death will be investigated internally and they will notify the Alameda County District Attorney's Office. Wilson said investigations into deaths that occur in police custody are handled like any other "unnatural" death and do not include special protocols. Speaking in general about coroner's investigations, she said the department can perform autopsies, interview witnesses, take photographs, review police reports and review the person's previous medical records. Wilson said some reports can take up to a year to complete.

LADEA & Sûreté du Québec!

Posted: Feb 12, 2013 5:09 AM ET - Last Updated: Feb 13, 2013 2:25 AM PST


North Hollywood, CA -- In the early morning of Sept. 7, 2012, U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agents and local police descended on an upscale apartment complex in North Hollywood. They detained two men, seized 15 kilograms of cocaine and $2.5 million — it's unclear whether the amount was in U.S. or Canadian — in cash, and ignited a cross-border controversy over how Canadian police handled millions of dollars in illicit cash.

The dispute threatens police co-operation between Canada and the U.S., as a number of sources affiliated with U.S. law enforcement accuse Canadian police of secretly operating an agent on U.S. soil without permission. One of the arrested men, who was carrying the money, was a 27-year-old car dealership employee from Vancouver. The U.S.-linked sources say he had worked as a Canadian police agent, fraternizing with importers of cocaine and exporters of marijuana. Believing he was working as a Canadian police agent, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration reluctantly allowed him to return to Vancouver without charge. The DEA has refused to release the money to Canadian officials, and the second suspect in the L.A. bust remains in custody. Officially, the DEA would not comment on the detainment and subsequent release of the man, but a spokesperson with the L.A. DEA office told Canadian News the investigation is ongoing.

Shortly after the seizure, the DEA office at the U.S Embassy in Ottawa received a call from Insp. Michel Forget (pictured left) of the Sûreté du Québec, a provincial police force, demanding to know the details of the L.A. arrest, and asking for the $2.5 million back. "[Forget] wasn't diplomatic or apologetic," a U.S. source told Canadian News, believing Canadian investigators were running a covert operation in L.A. without alerting the DEA. "What it was was an international incident." Forget denies that claim, saying his force has "good relationships" with U.S. law enforcement. Forget said the money confiscated in L.A. is important because it's evidence in Project Loquace — the Quebec portion of a Canada-wide crackdown on drug trafficking called Project Scrapyard. “It's not our money," said Forget. "It's the money that was linked to certain crimes that were committed here [in Canada] in the course of the investigation."

Forget, in an interview with Canadian News, said the Canadian detained in L.A. wasn’t working for his police force. "At no point did the Sûreté du Québec go into the U.S. to carry on their investigation. At no point did they have an agent, or whoever, to carry on the investigation on their behalf," Forget said. Eric Slinn, the RCMP’s acting director general for drugs and organized crime, told Canadian News the 27-year-old Canadian “was not an RCMP agent.” Slinn refused to say whether the man had worked for the RCMP in the past. The Vancouver Police Department issued a statement on Tuesday saying they were "not involved" with using the 27-year-old man "as an agent or asset" — a man who Canadian and U.S.-linked sources said is a known member of a Vancouver-area gang.

Project Loquace's first string of successes came in November 2012 when Quebec provincial police played the lead role in arresting 111 suspects across the country. In the process, Quebec police netted $255,000 in cash, 227 kilograms of cocaine, 73,000 pills, 80 kilograms of cannabis, 189 firearms, two Tasers, 13 barrels of a solvent that's commonly used to create date rape drugs, and 53 vehicles. Project Scrapyard, launched by the RCMP in the spring of 2012 with millions in seed money, is ongoing.

U.S.-linked sources said American officials are furious, and that the Department of Justice has been asked to start criminal proceedings against the man, who has returned to Vancouver, and are even considering charges against Canadian police if it's determined they sent an agent on a covert mission to L.A without first notifying American authorities.

A U.S. law enforcement source told Canadian News that if an agent was operating in L.A. on direction from a Canadian police force, then it was without approval from American authorities. That would contravene U.S. Code Title 18, subsection 951, which states that anyone who "acts in the United States as an agent of a foreign government without prior notification to the Attorney General shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than 10 years, or both." A memorandum of understanding exists between the two countries for procedures involving police authorities, but none were followed, U.S.-linked sources said. "If I want to send an email to Canada, or make a phone call into Canada, I need approval of the Canadian authorities," said the U.S. official, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

The U.S.-linked sources who spoke with Canadian News about the L.A. case are also upset with how Canadian investigators lost track of major amounts of drugs. They claim Canadian investigators working on Project Loquace infiltrated a domestic gang that traded marijuana for guns in the U.S., and sent $15 million to the infamous Los Zetas drug cartel in Mexico for precursor drugs that were then shipped through the U.S. to Quebec methamphetamine labs. The U.S.-linked sources complain Quebec police watched 500 kilograms of cocaine be distributed in Ontario and Quebec only to lose track of it — an amount that they say is worth close to $25 million on the street.

“First of all, I don’t know where you get your figures,” Forget responded in an interview with Canadian News. “We didn't let anything slip through our hands.” Forget refused to comment on the exact whereabouts of the cocaine his undercover officers tracked into Canada, citing upcoming prosecutions of accused gang members. “That’s part of the evidence,” said Forget. “All we did in the course of the investigation was use different means and investigative techniques to [undermine] a very important ring of drug traffickers that was trying to install themselves across the country. This is all I can say right now.”

Armed & Dangerous!

Posted: 02/12/2013 10:41:41 AM PST - Updated: 02/12/2013 12:24:41 PM PST

RICHMOND, CA -- A man who was critically wounded after being shot by police responding to a call of an armed suspect was expected to survive his injuries, police said Tuesday. The man, who was not identified by police, was struck multiple times in his torso and abdomen in the shooting late Monday afternoon, according to Richmond police Det. Nicole Abetkov. Police were sent to the St. Johns Apartments at Nevin Avenue and B Street about 4:57 p.m. after several 911 callers reported seeing an armed man in the area. Officers confronted the man, described as in his early 30s, behind the building on the south side of Nevin Avenue, Capt. Mark Gagan said Monday evening. Police did not say whether the man had aimed his weapon at officers or attempted to fire.

The officers involved have been placed on administrative leave, in compliance with policy. Police would not say how long the officers had been on the force or detail their service records.

It was the first officer-involved shooting for Richmond since December 2011, when police shot and wounded a man after a witness reported him carrying a gun at a hotel near Hilltop Mall.

Posted: 02/11/2013 06:00:53 PM PST - Updated: 02/11/2013 07:51:51 PM PST

RICHMOND, CA -- A 30-year-old man was taken to the hospital in critical condition Monday evening after being shot multiple times by officers at Nevin Avenue and B Street, police said. Police received several 911 calls reporting an armed man near the St. Johns Apartments at 4:57 p.m., at about the same time police ShotSpotter technology detected shots fired in that area, Capt. Mark Gagan said. Officers arrived and confronted an armed man on the sidewalk behind the apartment building on the south side of Nevin Avenue, Gagan said. Shortly thereafter, several officers fired multiple rounds at the man.

It was not immediately known how many times the man was shot or where on his body, Gagan said, but he was taken to the hospital in critical condition. It was not immediately known what prompted officers to fire their weapons nor was it known whether the suspect shot at or aimed a gun at police, Lt. Bisa French said. According to French, the officers have been placed on administrative leave per department policy.

The officer-involved shooting is being investigated, with the District Attorney's Office as the lead investigator, Gagan said. District attorney investigators were on the scene in the hours following the shooting.

"We have a county protocol that the DA takes the lead on officer-involved shootings to provide an unbiased account of the facts of the case," Gagan said.

LAPD: David Mack!

Published: June 10, 2012 - Modified: Tuesday, February 12, 2013, 05:25 PM PST

This is David Mack (pictured above, center). The former LAPD cop who is in jail robbery. Here are a few circumstantial connections to Biggie Smalls' murder, according to the New York media sources:

1. Biggie was killed by a very specific 9mm Gecko bullet that pierces bullet proof vests.
2. The 9mm Gecko bullets were found in Mack's apartment after his arrest for robbery, shortly after Biggie's murder.
3. A shrine to Tupac Shakur was also found during the search.

A touch circumstantial but while Mack's name was redacted, he still appears to be suspect # 1.

Black PD: Lovin White men
Killing & Incarcerating Black Men!

Published: June 10, 2012 - Modified: Wednesday, February 13, 2013, 01:25 AM PST

Broward County, Fla. -- Flora Michelle Vouglitois, at left, who has worked 16 years for the Broward Sheriff's Office, is shown in this photo with her husband, Kevin Vouglitois. She has been diagnosed with aggressive systemic mastocytosis, a rare disease affecting her bones and internal organs. Flora Michelle Vouglitois has worked 16 years for the Broward Sheriff's Office, and if she weren't ill these days, she would be ensuring people's safety in her high-energy job as a detention deputy.

But almost two years ago, the 42-year-old married mother of three began waking up nauseous in the mornings, leading to uncontrollable vomiting. The pain she experienced in her bones and stomach was so severe, it was difficult for her to sit or lie down.

"With family and friends and co-workers, they have helped a lot to keep me strong," Vouglitois said. "But sometimes, I have to sit back and look and say, 'Is this really happening to me?' I have to stay positive."

The Vouglitois family this year traveled to the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, which has a program devoted to her disorder. She is scheduled to finish chemotherapy in August, then plans to keep consulting with doctors about the bone marrow transplant in Boston. Her husband recalls seeing her in great pain before her illness was identified: She was misdiagnosed for months. "It is hard for me to complain about anything," said Kevin Vouglitois, 52. "She is my inspiration."

Sheriff's Sgt. Luis Galindez said he and other co-workers are "energized with the thought of her going up to Boston — that once she gets this bone marrow transplant, this will be the key to helping her get better."

"Quiet Courage!"

Posted: 6:47 am, May 17, 2012 - updated on: 07:31 am, May 17, 2012

New York -- The 'sacrifices and that quiet courage that exists among law enforcement officers all across the country', including New York, brings us (once again) the tragic killing of (unarmed) Ramarley Graham (pictured below, center) in his own bathroom by courageous NYPD Officer Richard Haste. Graham first came to the attention of NYPD officers because he had exited a storefront where they believed drug sales occurred. Paul J. Browne, the New York Police Department’s chief spokesman, said there was “no evidence that he was armed” when the officer, a member of a narcotics unit, shot him once in the upper left chest.



Haste, 30 (pictured below, center) and colleagues with the 47th Precinct Street Narcotics Enforcement Unit broke into his grandmother's apartment and shot Graham in the chest while he attempted to flush a bag of marijuana down the toilet. Haste confronted Graham in the bathroom, supposedly operating on incorrect information – which their own colleagues had confirmed to a supervisor as factual – that Graham had a gun in his waistband. Graham was unarmed and police did not have a warrant to enter the home. The large number of officers at the house indicated that Graham wasn't likely to escape and that officers could have waited to obtain a warrant before storming the apartment, said the Graham family's attorney. It was later claimed that two witnesses communicated to NYPD officers that they saw a gun on Graham’s person. The claim that Graham had a gun was then confirmed by the two NYPD officers to their supervisor Scott Morris. No gun was found on or around Graham.

Footage from private surveillance cameras shows Graham walking into his grandmother's apartment building, a three-story home on a residential street. Police officers, guns drawn, quickly follow and attempt to kick down the front door after finding it locked. In the back of the building, other officers swarm in through a rear apartment. The cameras do not capture what transpired inside, but police officials told news sources that officers entered the grandmother's apartment after she opened the door in response to loud knocks. They did not have a search warrant.

Haste's partner told investigators that Haste identified himself as a police officer, told Graham to "show his hands" and then yelled "gun, gun" before firing, Kelly said. But Graham's grandmother maintains that officers did not announce their presence entering her home and that Haste did not say anything to Graham before shooting him, the family's attorney said. Many linked the shooting to the NYPD's aggressive street policing program, called "stop-and-frisk," which predominantly targets low-income minority neighborhoods. In 2011, the program stopped and searched more than 500,000 New Yorkers, 85 percent of them black or Latino. The searches contributed to a record number of misdemeanor marijuana arrests last year.



Graham's death has sparked street protests in Wakefield, a low-income neighborhood with a large African-American and Caribbean immigrant population, with many decrying the police actions as brazenly illegal. "They had no business kicking down the door. They went too far," said Tyrone Harris, 27. "They need to go to jail just like any other citizen."

"'The Organized Drive-by'!"

Updated: December 20, 2012

Pasadena, CA -- Two Pasadena police officers who fatally shot a 19-year-old suspect after the theft of a man’s backpack in March acted lawfully and will not face any criminal charges, the district attorney’s office announced this week. Kendrec Lavelle McDade’s shooting on March 24 led to an outcry from relatives and activists who claimed police used excessive force by opening fire on the unarmed man. Police, however, claimed the officers believed McDade had a weapon, because the man who reported the backpack theft falsely told a 911 dispatcher he had been robbed by armed assailants. According to the district attorney’s Justice System Integrity Division, the officers acted in lawful self-defense and defense of others.


According to the report released by prosecutors Tuesday, Griffin and Newlen both told investigators they believed McDade was armed as they chased him—Griffin in a patrol car and Newlen on foot. “At every point that I saw him, he was still clutching his waistband,” Griffin said, according to the report. “I felt that it was a gun that he didn’t want to give up.” Newlen said that even when McDade fell during the pursuit, he kept his right hand at his waist, according to the report. The officers spotted McDade, who matched the armed suspect’s description and took off after him. Griffin removed his own weapon from his holster with his right hand as he steered the patrol car with his left.

Newlen was running north on Sunset Avenue after McDade when Griffin (pictured far left) tried to box McDade in with the car. McDade ran a few steps past and then “suddenly turned into the street heading directly at Griffin,” according to the report. “He left the sidewalk and he’s running at me,” Griffin said, according to investigators. “This . . . this scares the crap out of me. I don’t know why he’s running at me. He’s still clutching his waistband. I think he’s got a gun. I’m stuck in the car. I got nowhere to go.” Griffin said he fired four times through the driver’s side window as McDade moved down the side of the car. Newlen, standing 10 to 15 feet behind McDade, heard shots and thought the suspect was firing at him. Newlen said he fired his gun four to five times until McDade fell to the ground.

When McDade was searched, an officer found a cell phone in his front pocket, but no weapon. He was taken by ambulance to Huntington Memorial Hospital and into surgery, but died of his wounds just after midnight. Kendrec McDade’s autopsy was released and it revealed he was shot seven times with three of the bullets causing fatal injuries. The autopsy also showed McDade was not shot in the back. The report documented that McDade sustained seven wounds, and notes that “three of the wounds were fatal due to lacerated arteries, including two to his lower abdomen and one to his upper right arm, back to front.

Asked if he was pleased with the conclusions of the report, Deputy Pasadena Police Department Chief Darryl Qualls replied that “as a police department, we want the truth to be examined and to come out.” Investigators found there was no reason for Griffin and Newlen to doubt the information they had from dispatch of an armed suspect. Both men fired in fear for their life, they concluded. “Once the officers perceived that McDade posed an apparent lethal threat, their response with deadly force was justified,” the letter, signed on behalf of District Attorney Jackie Lacey, concludes.

Posted: 3:10 PM EDT, Wed May 2, 2012 - Updated: 1:59 PM PDT, Dec 20, 2012

Pasadena, CA (WCJB) -- The two Pasadena police officers who fatally shot a 19-year-old unarmed college student returned to work this week, but are at desk jobs and are not in the field, authorities said. Officers Jeff Newlen and Matt Griffin shot Kendrec McDade (pictured below, center) while responding to a call regarding an armed robbery March 24. The officer who shot first believed McDade was armed and fired at the teen from the inside of his police cruiser. The officers were placed on paid administrative leave immediately after the incident but have returned to work, Pasadena Police Lt. Phlunte Riddle told media sources. "The investigation is ongoing," Riddle said. "After the initial assessment there's no reason at this point not to bring them back into the organization, and they will be under evaluation if or when they return to the field."


The department declined to release recording of the radio transmission from the evening of the shooting to this newspaper. A similar request was made by the Pasadena branch of the NAACP and the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California.

A police report filed after the officer-involved shooting that killed Kendrec McDade lists the two officers as victims and McDade as a suspect, according to documents reviewed Thursday by this newspaper. Officers Newlen and Griffin shot and killed McDade, 19, late Saturday after responding to a report - which police now say was false - of an armed robbery in Northwest Pasadena. As victims, Griffin and Newlen, are eligible for the same monetary compensation available to all crime victims in California, officials said. Police Lt. Phlunte Riddle said it's a common practice in the department to list officers who shoot suspects as victims. "In their minds, (the officers) felt fear for their lives, and they become the victims in that case," Riddle said. Griffin and Newlen could be eligible for compensation such as medical expense reimbursement and psychological care, said Sandi Gibbons, a Los Angeles County district attorney's spokeswoman.


Griffin and Newlen aren't the first Pasadena officers to be classified as victims after an officer-involved shooting. The officers who shot Leroy Barnes were also listed as victims, Riddle said. "Go back and look at the (Leroy) Barnes incident. That's definitely the standard," Riddle said. A McDade family attorney said police departments often list officers as victims to shield law enforcement from civil suits. "It makes it difficult, if not impossible, to sue in civil court," he said.

Classifying officers as victims seems peculiar to First Amendment Coalition Executive Director Peter Scheer. He said he was not aware of any similar cases. "They may have experienced fear to the point as to see themselves as victims," Scheer said. "But I still think it strikes me as odd to include that in a police report given that what they experienced is what they are trained to experience." Scheer questioned whether the fear felt by officers wasn't to be expected as a part of routine police work. "Isn't that part of their job?" Scheer said. Scheer said agencies could use the tactic to turn the tables on plaintiffs in a lawsuit. "If (officers) are concerned about the possibility of lawsuit against them individually, the statement where they said they were also harmed could lay the groundwork for a counterclaim," Scheer said.

Police have booked Oscar Carrillo, 26, of Pasadena on suspicion of manslaughter and alleged that he made a false 9-1-1 call indicating that McDade and an unidentified 17-year-old accomplice were armed. Carrillo was booked Wednesday afternoon. The District Attorney's Office has declined to charge Carrillo.

The Pasadena Police Department, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office, the Office of Independent Review and the FBI have all launched inquiries into the shooting. Those reports are not expected to be completed and released to the public for six to eight months, Riddle said. "At this point there is no evidence to indicate that there was any criminal activity" on the part of the officers, Riddle said.

"'White Plains'!"

Posted: May 4, 2012

NEW YORK (WCJB) -- A New York grand jury has declined to indict a white police officer who shot and killed an ailing black veteran in his own apartment, the Westchester County District Attorney's Office said Thursday. The shooting occurred in November after police responded to a call that Kenneth Chamberlain, who suffered from respiratory and heart problems, had set off his medical alert device, indicating he needed help. The encounter was recorded by audio and video devices, which police planned to release to the public after Chamberlain's family accused police of excessive force and racial profiling. District Attorney Janet DiFiore, who referred to the shooting as a tragedy, said Thursday that the grand jury heard from 42 witnesses, including Police Officer Anthony Carelli, (pictured right) who fired the fatal shots. She said Chamberlain had threatened the police officers and would not respond to telephone calls from the medical alert operators.


Police officers forced their way into his apartment and fired a Taser and bean bags at Chamberlain to try to subdue him. Then they fired real bullets. The Taser is equipped with a video camera that recorded the incident, but it cuts off before the bullets were fired. The medical alert device also recorded audio of the encounter. Chamberlain's family was allowed to review that evidence earlier and accused officers of acting too aggressively on an ailing man inside his own home who was not suspected of any crime. They also and said a police officer used a racial epithet when referring to Chamberlain. "He feared for his life," said Chamberlain's son, also named Kenneth. "He kept asking them to go away and that he didn't need their help." Chamberlain's niece, Tonya Greenhill, was outside the door with police asking them to let her talk to her uncle instead of forcing their way in, she said. "I heard my uncle begging and pleading them to please leave him alone. I could begin to almost hear fear in his voice."

Chamberlain, a 68-year-old former Marine, had such severe respiratory problems he could not walk a flight of stairs, according to his medical records. The Life Station pendant he wore would alert their operators if he was in trouble. When it went off just before 5 a.m. that November morning, police and an ambulance were dispatched to the scene of his housing project in White Plains, north of New York City near Connecticut. A loudspeaker inside his apartment was used to try to contact him, but they got no response. Greenhill, who lives in the building, said her uncle told them he was fine when they arrived but did not want to open the door. She said she insisted to police that they let him talk to his family but they refused.

David Chong, White Plains public safety commissioner, told reporters police force was justified because Chamberlain displayed knives when he cracked open the door to speak with officers. The videotape cuts off at the time of the shooting. Following the grand jury's decision not to charge the police officer, White Plains said it would review its procedures for dealing with emotionally disturbed people. Parallels drawn to Trayvon Martin case In wake of the case of Trayvon Martin, the unarmed, black 17-year-old who was shot and killed in Sanford, Florida, by a neighborhood watch volunteer, the Chamberlain case gained national attention with more than 206,000 signing an online petition asking for District Attorney Janet DiFiore to charge the officers involved in the shooting with murder and civil rights violations.

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