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"The Bell Curve!"


Los Angeles, CA • U.S.A. (T.A.D.) -- After pleading no contest to corruption charges and agreeing to cooperate with prosecutors, former Bell administrator Robert Rizzo would not be interviewed for his own probation report before he was sentenced. Rizzo was sentenced Wednesday to 12 years in state prison for the crimes in Bell.

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Wednesday, December 28, 2011

A Monstrous Cycle!

December 28, 2011


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Catholic Priest!


Busted!

Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, USA (T.A.D.) -- Rev. W. Jeffrey Paulish, a Catholic priest in Pennsylvania has been charged with molesting a teenage boy.

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Living with Murder!

Description: (Bottom of Page) Detroit, MI -- In this 40-minute documentary the Free Press goes beyond the statistics to tell the story of a city shaped by a culture of violence and indiscriminate 'street justice.' With a soundtrack by Detroit musician Nick Speed. Copyright © 2013 Corrupt Justice™. All Rights Reserved.

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“Another Nigger fried. No big deal.”

-- April 16, 2011, Statement by New York City Police Officer Michael Daragjati, boasting of his false arrest of another African-American male.

Top News Story!

Freed to Kill,... Again!

Posted: 10:38 pm, Friday, Jan. 11, 2013 - Updated: 2:23 pm, Sun. Jan. 13, 2013



Vallejo, CA -- A Vallejo man accused of murdering his elderly mother three decades after escaping the death sentence he earned by abducting and killing two teenage girls seemed to lay bare his demons Friday in a Fairfield courtroom. "This is the third one," muttered Dennis Fink Stanworth, 70 (pictured above-center) as he sobbed and sat slumped in a wheelchair during his brief arraignment in Solano County Superior Court. "I plead guilty to everything," he said, later adding, "I did everything."

Stanworth made his first court appearance two days after he allegedly called 911 to report he had killed his 90-year-old mother, Nellie Stanworth, at his home in the quiet Hiddenbrooke subdivision. Officers found her decomposed body in the backyard.

The victim lived in a mobile-home park in American Canyon. Her neighbors said "Nellie Belle," as they called her, had been in good health but had been losing her mobility. She had recently suffered a fall that required stitches above one of her eyes, they said. The neighbors said they had not seen her for more than a month, and that Dennis Stanworth - who continued to pick up his mother's mail every day - reported she had died. Records show someone put the home up for sale for $39,000 on Nov. 29, then pulled it off the market two weeks later.


Judge Donna Stashyn refused to accept Stanworth's attempted plea after his attorney stepped in to silence him. Stanworth is scheduled to return to court Friday to face charges that could send him - once again - to Death Row. Deputy District Attorney Karen Jensen said after the arraignment that Nellie Stanworth was killed on or about Nov. 6 at the house, which the defendant shared with his wife and her father. Police have questioned both. "It's unclear at this time what they knew and when they knew it," Jensen said. She declined to comment on possible motives for the killing and said an autopsy conducted Friday might reveal a cause of death. Jensen said her office will decide whether to seek capital punishment at a later date.

Dennis Stanworth is eligible for the death penalty because prosecutors charged him with a special circumstance that is rarely alleged - that he murdered someone after previously being convicted of murder. Dennis Stanworth's wife, who attended the court hearing, and his attorney, Deputy Public Defender Oscar Bobrow, declined to comment.



Stanworth was sentenced to death in 1966 for murdering Susan Box, 15, and Caree Collison, 14, both students at De Anza High School in El Sobrante, after he picked them up as they were hitchhiking in Pinole. He drove them to a spot overlooking San Pablo Bay, where he shot Collison in the head when she tried to escape. Then he shot Box and had sex with her body, according to court records. Before the killings, Stanworth kidnapped three young women in El Sobrante and Richmond in separate incidents in 1965 and 1966 and sexually assaulted them, court records show.

While on Death Row, Stanworth wrote to the California Supreme Court, saying he wanted to waive the automatic appeal of his death sentence. "Please be merciful and give me an endless sleep as soon as you can so this pain and suffering that I have will be no more," he said. But five years after his conviction, the California Supreme Court overturned his death sentence because of irregularities during jury selection.

He was again sentenced to death after a retrial, but that term was commuted to life in prison in 1974 after the state's capital punishment law was declared unconstitutional. He was paroled in 1990.

Mayes of Death!

Posted: May 08, 2012 | Updated: May 08, 2012 07:28 PM PDT.

Tennessee -- Police in two states and the Federal Bureau of Investigation are hunting for Adam Mayes. Authorities believe he still holds the two youngest daughters of Jo Ann Bain, whose body was discovered along with that of her 14-year-old daughter Adrienne, behind a barn on Mayes' property.

Teresa Mayes, wife of Adam Mayes, was arrested Sunday along with his mother, Mary Mayes, officials said Tuesday. Both remain jailed at Hardeman County Jail in Tennessee. Teresa Mayes, 31, has been charged with four counts of especially aggravated kidnapping and held on a $500,000 bond, Hardeman County Circuit Court Clerk Linda Fulghum said. Mary Mayes, 65, has been charged with four counts of conspiracy to commit especially aggravated kidnapping and held on $300,000 bond, the clerk said. The two Mayes women were arrested without incident late Sunday in Union County, Mississippi, and transported across the state line to Hardeman County, where they were booked early Monday, Union County Sheriff Jimmy Edwards said.

"We developed information that led us to believe that they were a part of it," Edwards said. An affidavit filed with the Hardeman County Court said that Teresa Mayes told Tennessee Bureau of Investigation agents that she drove the victims from Hardeman County, Tennessee, to Union County, Mississippi. Edwards said it doesn't appear either woman knows the whereabouts Adam Mayes or the two missing Bain children. Mayes was last seen in Guntown, north of Tupelo, last Tuesday, according to the FBI.

On Monday, the medical examiner in Memphis confirmed two bodies found last weekend behind Mayes' barn in Guntown, Mississippi, were those of Jo Ann Bain, 31, and her oldest daughter, Adrienne Bain, 14, the FBI said. Both Teresa and Mary Mayes told investigators they saw Adam Mayes digging in the backyard in Mississippi on April 27, the day of the disappearance. Authorities also believe at least one of the two Mayes women knew about the bodies, Edwards said. He didn't say which one.

The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation said it is believed Mayes has changed his appearance and that he may have altered the appearances of his victims, perhaps by cutting and dying their hair. Bain's other two daughters, Alexandria, 12, and Kyliyah, 8 - taken along with their mother and older sister from their home - were believed to still be with Mayes, the FBI said on Monday night. Bain's husband reported the four missing from their rural western Tennessee home April 27. Mayes, described as a friend of the family who was at their home to help them move to Arizona, was quickly identified as a suspect.

Teen Tourist Killer!

Posted: Mar 29, 2012 | Updated: Apr 2, 2012.


The Grim-X-mas Reaper!

Posted: Wed. December 28, 2011 3:37 PM PST - Updated:



A man charged in the bludgeoning death and dismemberment of a 9-year-old Indiana girl is wanted in Florida for violating probation in 2000, officials said Wednesday. Michael Plumadore, 39, faces one count of murder in the death of Aliahna Lemmon (pictured above, center). He was being held without bond after a court appearance Tuesday. He was arrested Monday night after the girl's body was found. Allen County Sheriff Ken Fries told media sources, "Some of the story we heard from the beginning with him led us to believe he was the key to this case, that ... he was the one who was going to have the answers we were looking for."

Plumadore's confession came after several hours of interrogation Monday evening. "It was very factual when he started telling them what happened. And they just had to sit there and listen to him as if they were just listening to a story with no emotion, just trying to get him to say more and more and more," Fries said. "He was the one who saw her last," Fries said. "He was the one who had the most contact with her." In a probable cause affidavit released Tuesday, Allen County, Indiana, sheriff's investigators said Plumadore (pictured left) admitted striking the girl repeatedly in the head with a brick as she stood on the front steps of his mobile home in the early hours of December 22. He told authorities he stored Aliahna's body in garbage bags in a freezer at his home until that night, when he allegedly dismembered it with a hacksaw, according to the affidavit. Plumadore allegedly told investigators he threw parts of the body in a nearby commercial trash bin but kept the head, hands and feet in his freezer, according to the document. Florida Department of Corrections records show that Plumadore was charged with battery on a law enforcement officer, firefighter or EMS worker in May 2000, and later that month he was sentenced to a year of community supervision. But he failed to report to his probation officer or attend a court-ordered anger management class the following month, said department spokeswoman Ann Howard. Details of the offense were unavailable because of the time that has passed, she said. However, Plumadore is listed in the department database as "absconder/fugitive." Posted: Tues. December 27, 2011 10:13 AM PST - Updated: FORT WAYNE, Ind. - A babysitter and trusted neighbor has confessed that he bludgeoned a 9-year-old Indiana girl to death with a brick then dismembered her, hiding her head, hands and feet at his home and dumping the rest of her remains nearby, police said Tuesday. Allen County sheriff's investigators said in an affidavit that 39-year-old Michael Plumadore admits he killed Aliahna Lemmon on Dec. 22. According to the affidavit, Plumadore told police that after beating Aliahna to death, he stuffed her body into trash bags and hid her in the freezer at his trailer. He said he later chopped up her body and stuffed her remains into freezer bags. Police said Plumadore told them he had hidden Aliahna's head, feet and hands at his trailer and that he had discarded her other remains at a nearby business. Police obtained a warrant to search his trailer on Monday and found the body parts. A judge ordered Plumadore held without bail or bond at an initial hearing Tuesday, sheriff's department spokesman Cpl. Jeremy Tinkel said. He has yet to be formally charged in Aliahna's death. Mike Plumadore sits next to the chair where Aliahna Lemmon, 9, was last seen before she went missing, in this Dec. 25, 2011 photo. Allen County Sheriff Ken Fries said Plumadore (pictured above, center) was arrested after being interviewed by detectives for several hours Monday — and was also questioned Friday and Saturday. "The story just didn't make sense to our investigators or to me when I first heard it," Fries said. "I thought this is the guy we needed to focus on. If we are going to find her, he's going to be the one who has the answers for us."
Aliahna and her two younger sisters were staying with Plumadore because their mother had been sick with the flu. "He was a trusted family friend," Aliahna's step-grandfather, David Story, told media sources late Monday, saying he was surprised by the arrest. "It did come to a horrible conclusion," Fries told media sources. "We have somebody in custody now who can pay the price for it." Plumadore told media sources on Sunday that Aliahna (pictured left) disappeared from his home Friday morning while he was sleeping after having gone to a gas station about a mile away to buy a cigar. Authorities have said the store's surveillance video shows him there about that time. Plumadore claimed that he left the three girls in his mobile home about 6 a.m. Friday and went to a gas station about a mile away to buy a cigar. Authorities have said the store's surveillance video shows him there about that time. "I had dead-bolted the door," he said. "When I got back, all the girls was here." He said he smoked his cigar and went back to sleep, then woke up about 10 a.m. when Aliahna's mother called. After that call, he realized the door to the home was unlocked and that Aliahna was gone. He said Aliahna's 6-year-old sisters told him Aliahna had left with her mother. Plumadore said it wasn't until he talked with Aliahna's mother about 8:30 p.m. that they realized she was missing and police were notified. Souders said the miscommunication caused the delay in determining that Aliahna had vanished. Aliahna's mother, Tarah Souders, told media sources on Sunday that her daughter had vision, hearing and emotional problems and suffered from attention deficit disorder. "She's never wandered off," she said Sunday. Aliahna and her sisters were staying with Plumadore because their mother had been sick with the flu and Aliahna's stepfather works at night and sleeps during the day. More than 100 emergency workers searched for her Saturday around the rundown mobile home park where Aliahna and Plumadore lived and FBI agents were there Monday. Fries said Plumadore told investigators on Monday where the girl's body could be found, ending the hopes of authorities that Aliahna would be found safe. A state website shows that 15 registered sex offenders live in the park that numbers about two dozen homes. Plumadore is not on Indiana's registered sex offenders list. He has a criminal record in Florida and North Carolina that includes convictions for trespassing and assault. Elizabeth Watkins, who lives nearby, said residents are cautious and keep to themselves in part because of the number of sex offenders living in the mobile home park. "I'm numb, I'm totally numb. I don't know what to think," she said.

Still Missing!

Posted: 12/29/2011 8:50:17 AM ET - Updated: 12/29/2011 10:04:17 AM PT Waterville, Maine (WCJB) -- On Wednesday, Waterville police said they have wrapped up large-scale searches for missing child, Ayla Reynolds. With assistance from firefighters and residents, authorities have repeatedly probed private properties, nearby woods, open fields and waterways on foot and by air, according to the Waterville police. They have searched trash bins and drained a stream in an attempt to find the missing toddler. Police concluded that Ayla, who recently started walking, did not leave the house on her own. The child was reported missing on Dec. 17, 2011. She was last seen by Justin DiPietro, the father of 20-month-old Ayla, in his Waterville, Maine home, when he put her to bed the previous night.
DiPietro and Trista Reynolds, 23, have not spoken once since the child’s disappearance or during the ensuing wide-scale search by local authorities. The grandfather of a missing 20-month-old Maine girl repeated over and over Wednesday night that the girl's father has not been in touch with the family, even as the father reiterated he doesn't know what happened to her. "Nothing, not a word, nothing," Ron Reynolds told media sources. "My daughter tried to talk to him. Nothing's coming back ... nothing is being said." Posted: 9:22 PM EST, Mon December 26, 2011 - Updated: 3:59 PM PST, Wed. December 28, 2011 Waterville, Maine (WCJB) -- Authorities in Waterville, Maine, on Monday offered a $30,000 reward for information that would lead investigators to find 20-month-old Ayla Reynolds (pictured left). The young girl was last reported seen more than a week ago, and police are now confident that someone was involved in taking Ayla from her house, said Waterville Police Chief Joseph Massey. Ayla is described as having blond hair, being about 2 feet, 9 inches tall, and weighing 30 pounds. She was last seen wearing green pajamas with white polka dots and the words "Daddy's Princess" across the front. When she disappeared, the girl had her arm in a soft cast. "This is the largest reward that I can remember for a missing-person case in Maine's history," he told reporters. "I'm very hopeful that this will encourage anyone that has any information to call the Waterville police."
Ayla's family is cooperating, and police do not have anyone connected to the case in custody. Authorities have conducted dozens of searches so far, involving federal and local law enforcement. Work to find the missing girl continued over the weekend with police sorting through leads, said Massey. "Like in most missing person cases, it concerns us as time goes on," the police chief said.

Inbreeding???

Posted: 5:01 PM EST, Thu December 22, 2011 - Updated: 10:46 AM PST, Tue December 27, 2011
"We have reason to believe inbreeding occurred in Aron's family." -- December 21, 2011, Statement by a defense attorney for accused child killer/torturer Levi Aron to media sources regarding his defense for Mr. Aron's actions.
New York (WCJB) -- The lawyer for the man charged with kidnapping and killing an 8-year-old boy in Brooklyn last summer says inbreeding is partially to blame for his client's actions. In July, police found 8-year-old Leiby Kletzky's (pictured right) remains divided between a freezer in Levi Aron's (pictured left) attic apartment and a trash bin more than two miles away. The boy had asked Aron for directions after getting lost on his seven-block walk home from summer camp, police said. It was his first time making the trip alone. Kletzky died after being drugged and then smothered, New York City's chief medical examiner said after an autopsy in July. "We have reason to believe" inbreeding occurred in Aron's family, a defense attorney told media sources Wednesday. Asked what proof of inbreeding he had, the attorney said he had "anecdotal evidence in talking to the family," but declined to elaborate. Asked how inbreeding might lead someone to murder, the attorney said he is "not a medical doctor," but believes that inbreeding "can result in certain kinds of mental defects." Aron pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity in August, according to his attorney. A status conference in the case was held Wednesday. Both sides discussed the turning over of discovery materials at the pretrial hearing, the attorney said. Schizophrenia and brain trauma also factored into Aron's actions, his attorney contended to media sources. Aron has a family history of schizophrenia, the attorney said. His sister committed suicide as a result of the mental illness, according to the attorney. And at a young age Aron suffered a brain-damaging fall from a bicycle, his attorney said. "He's virtually catatonic each and every time I have (been) called upon to deal with him," he said of his client's mental condition. A mental evaluation of Aron in August found that he was fit to stand trial. The next hearing in the case is scheduled for March. Aron's attorney declined to say whether he would raise the issue of inbreeding at trial, emphasizing that the defense team would continue to investigate that angle in the coming months. He did not specify what form that investigation would take. If convicted, Aron could face a maximum sentence of life in prison without parole.

Evil Incarnate!

Posted: Mon Dec 19, 2011 10:24am PST - Updated: New York (WCJB) -- A 47-year-old man was arrested Sunday in the death of a 73-year-old woman who was set on fire in the elevator of her Brooklyn apartment building, telling police the woman owed him $2,000, New York police said. Jerome Isaac (pictured above, center) faces charges of first-degree and second-degree murder, along with arson, police said in a statement. Isaac told police Gillespie owed him $2,000 for work he claims he did for her, said NYPD Deputy Commissioner Paul Browne. He turned himself in to police overnight or early Sunday morning, he said. A preliminary investigation showed the man was standing outside the elevator on the fifth floor and attacked the woman as she was attempting to exit, authorities said. The incident was caught on surveillance cameras inside and outside the elevator, and police have the videotapes, Browne said. Authorities believe Isaac initially sprayed the woman with a flammable liquid, presumably gasoline, and continued to spray her as he followed her back into the elevator, Browne said. The woman was first sprayed in the face, he said. Then, using "one of those long lighters that you would use for a grill, he lit a Molotov cocktail and used the burning leg on top of that to ignite her body," Browne said. The suspect stepped out of the elevator, threw the Molotov cocktail inside, then returned again to spray more liquid on the woman as she burned, he said. Authorities responding to a 911 call of a fire found the woman's body inside the elevator. She was pronounced dead at the scene, according to the police statement.
The victim was identified as Deloris Gillespie. Isaac also lives in Brooklyn, but does not live at the address where the incident took place, police said in a statement. Isaac lived about 10 minutes away from Gillespie's apartment building, Brown said. After the incident, he apparently returned home and ignited the door to his own apartment, he said. He was concerned he had burned himself in the second incident, although no one else was injured, Browne said. He then hid out on a rooftop for a while and fell asleep, later going into a police station "reeking of gasoline" and telling officers he was responsible for a fire. During questioning, Browne said, he implicated himself in Gillespie's death. It was not clear whether Isaac had retained an attorney.

Eagle Rock Fire!

Posted: Fri. December 16, 2011 | 06:58:58 PM PST - Updated: Thurs. December 22, 2011 2:30 PM PST
"I went to grab her, not to hurt her but to talk to her." -- Los Angeles Fire Department captain David Del Toro, 54, testifying before jurors that he did not kill Jennifer Flores at his Eagle Rock home, or later drag her dead body down the road attached to his pick-up truck.
Los Angeles, CA -- A former Los Angeles Fire Department captain who killed a woman in his Eagle Rock home and dragged her nude body behind his truck was sentenced Friday to 15 years to life in prison for a crime the judge called "baffling." Following a three-week trial, David Del Toro (pictured above, center) was found guilty in March of the second-degree murder of Jennifer Flores, 42, whose battered body was found dumped in the street a few blocks from the fire fighter's home in August 2006. Del Toro, 55, was a 23-year veteran of the city's fire department at the time of the murder. He had served as a drill instructor and worked at stations in Arleta, Skid Row, Lincoln Heights, Silver Lake and Hollywood. "He's done wonderful things in his life," Judge Lance Ito said before handing down the sentence. "So it makes the events of the day in question so much more baffling. You can't have these factors come together and make any sense." Flores, of San Gabriel, was an acquaintance whom Del Toro had allowed to stay at his home the previous night. She had been beaten so badly that her jaw, ribs and nose were broken before she was strangled. Other injuries included postmortem road rash on her back, which investigators believe occurred when Flores' body fell out of the back of Del Toro's truck and was dragged for about a mile. "It's unfathomable how this man beat the life out of this woman, mutilated her hair ... then continued to drag her lifeless, naked body on the street as if killing her wasn't enough," said Ellen Flores, the victim's sister-in-law. "Only an evil man could have done this. Even an animal does not deserve to be so ruthlessly killed." Del Toro had killed Flores in a drunken rage when she turned him down for sex, dumped her body and returned home to clean up the mess, according to prosecutor Bobby Grace. The firefighter had a history of alcoholism and domestic violence, and was temporarily suspended by the fire department for beating an ex-wife and ex-girlfriend, Grace said. "It was inevitable he was going to end up killing somebody," Grace said after the sentencing. But Del Toro, who testified in his own defense, maintained that he did not kill Flores, although he admitted that his memory was spotty from the heavy drinking he had done that night. "I don't remember killing her. I don't believe I killed her," Del Toro said during testimony. "I just didn't kill her. I don't know how I would know, but I know I didn't kill her." The Flores family had hoped for a first-degree murder conviction, which would have meant a maximum sentence of 25 years to life in prison. With the second-degree murder conviction, Del Toro will have to serve 85 percent of his sentence - about 12 or 13 years - before being eligible for parole, according to Grace. The firefighter was also given 1,555 days credit for time served since his Nov. 2006 arrest. Members of the Flores family, who described the five-year ordeal as "grueling," were relieved at some semblance of closure, but said they would never fully get over Jennifer Flores' death. "Her future was cut way too short," said Edward Flores, her father. "I cry for her every single day. We won't be able to hug her ... she'll never have children."

Georgia: Initial Appearances!

Posted: 10:02 PM EST, Thu December 8, 2011 - Updated: Tues Dec 13, 2011 10:42am PST Canton, Georgia (WCJB) -- New details emerged in the brutal slaying of a 7-year-old Georgia girl, hours after an attorney for the suspect said his client would plead not guilty. Authorities have charged 20-year-old maintenance worker Ryan Brunn with killing Jorelys Riveria (pictured left). Seven-year-old Jorelys mouth was duct-taped, and her hands and feet were bound with plastic ties, a source close to the investigation said. Authorities have said Jorelys died of blunt force trauma to the head, was stabbed and had been sexually assaulted. Jorelys, who was last seen alive Friday near a playground at the apartment complex where Brunn worked in Canton, Georgia. They found her mangled body in a trash compactor there three days later, the source said. The warrant for Brunn's arrest charged him with murder and making false statements to law enforcement. "The accused did unlawfully and with malice aforethought cause the death of Jorelys Rivera by hitting her on the head with a blunt object," it said. Authorities have said there will likely be other charges, including kidnapping and sexual molestation.
Brunn (pictured above, center) who was arrested Wednesday, is in segregated confinement in prison and was required to wear a bullet-proof vest Thursday due to the nature of the case, said Lt. Jay Baker, a spokesman for the Cherokee County Sheriff's Office. "It's been a hot issue in the community. We didn't want to take any chances," Baker told reporters. Authorities said Brunn has no known criminal history. Thursday's court appearance came after the little girl's mother called for capital punishment for the suspect. The little girl's father, Ricardo Galarza, lives in Puerto Rico. He told media sources on Thursday that he last saw his daughter two years ago when she visited for the summer. She was supposed to visit for Christmas this year, Galarza said. He echoed Rivera's call for the death penalty.
A court date for an arraignment has not been set. One of Brunn's court-appointed attorneys said his client will enter a "not guilty plea" at the appropriate time. Brunn wore an orange jumpsuit and a bullet-proof vest Thursday during his initial court appearance. His hands and feet were shackled during the hearing, which lasted only a few minutes. After Cherokee County Superior Court Judge Frank Mills read him his rights Thursday, Brunn said he understood what he was being charged with and was satisfied with his counsel. After the hearing, one defense attorney told reporters that his client was "very shaken." "We're investigating our case," he said. "It's obviously a very tragic case. It's a very serious case. We take it very seriously. Just give us time to do our jobs." Brunn has not made a public statement, but his adopted brother has said he is innocent. His adopted brother, Connor, told media sources that the arrest was a "big mistake." "I honestly think he is innocent. There's just no way he would do something like this. He's just a kind-hearted person," Connor Brunn said. He has spoken with Ryan, he said, who told him "he wouldn't touch a girl like that." "He wouldn't ever do something like that. ... This is just all bogus. ... He knew that he was suspected but he never, like, thought that it would go to him. He was asked to help to go look for this little girl. And then he got brought into this," Connor Brunn said. Jorelys was abducted "in the immediate vicinity" of the apartment complex's playground, then taken to an empty apartment nearby, Keenan said. "We have evidence that the murder occurred in that vacant apartment," he said. "At some point, the child's body was then disposed of in the Dumpster and compacted into trash." Neighbor Heather Johnson-Coker said residents were suspicious of Brunn after investigators found Jorelys' body in the trash compactor, which can only be operated with a key that employees at the complex have. She said the maintenance worker had mentioned the large number of vacant apartments in the complex when a boy from the area went missing for a few hours recently. "He said, and I quote, 'It would be really easy for someone to break in and do something to one of these children,'" Johnson-Coker said Wednesday. Connor Brunn said investigators should have focused on the complex's other maintenance workers, who also had access to the trash compactor, instead of his brother. "I think they were looking at him because he was one of the maintenance guys there," he said. "But he's just one out of what, four or five other maintenance guys that work there?" Brunn was one of hundreds of people whom investigators interviewed in their search for suspects, Keenan said Wednesday.
On what friends say is Ryan Brunn's Facebook page, he described himself as being "very outgoing" and having "a 'wonderful' life, family, and friends." In July, he posted a message slamming Casey Anthony, who was acquitted of killing her daughter in Florida. He wrote that Casey Anthony should have died, "but really she'll get hers." "We're confident that Brunn is a killer," Keenan charged, but he added that the investigation will continue for months. "We are investigating all of the past history of Ryan Brunn and piecing together what he's been doing the last several years," he added. "We have sent agents to other states and also to other counties and we're going to backtrack all of his activities and make a determination if he has been involved in other crimes. He has no known criminal history to us, but we will find out."

Oklahoma: Dual Patterns!

Posted: 7:37 PM EST, Fri December 9, 2011 - Updated: 11:55 AM PST, Thurs. December 29, 2011 Weleetka, Oklahoma -- A 25-year-old Oklahoma man was charged Friday with murder in the deaths of two girls who were found about three and a half years ago, shot to death in a ditch alongside a remote country road. "We don't believe that he knew (the slain girls) directly," Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation Director Stan Florence said Friday of Kevin Sweat (pictured left). "We just believe that he happened to be in the area that day." According to a probable cause affidavit, Sweat told investigators on September 13 that he'd been driving his Chevrolet Cavalier where the girls were found when he saw "two monsters" come at him. The suspect said he "panicked," shooting the "monsters" first with a Glock .40 handgun and then with a .22 handgun he'd had in his glove box, the affidavit said. It claimed Sweat had voluntarily waived his rights and agreed to talk to investigators. The "monsters" are believed to be best friends Taylor Paschal-Placker, 13, of Weleetka and Skyla Jade Whittaker, 11, of nearby Henryetta, who were discovered June 8, 2008, by Taylor's grandfather. They had been shot in the head and chest, eight times for Skyla and five for Taylor, the state medical examiner reported after an autopsy.
Their killings rattled Weleetka, a town of just over 1,000 residents, with police calling the shootings the community's first murders in more than 20 years. They also set off an extensive investigation involving multiple local, state and federal law enforcement agencies and including about 650 interviews, 900 leads and 19,000 forensic tests on 800 pieces of evidence, according to Florence. In January 2010, Sweat was among those interviewed about the girls' murder, because he owned a Glock .40 Model 22 handgun like one of those thought to be used in the shootings. He then told an investigator then that he'd sold such a gun in 2007, according to the arrest affidavit. Sweat was not considered a suspect until this year, after being arrested and charged with the murder of his girlfriend, Ashley Taylor, Florence said. He was already in the Seminole County Jail in his girlfriend's death when the new charges were filed, according to the state investigative bureau director. He is charged on four counts related to the 2008 case: two each of first-degree murder, plus two each of shooting with intent to kill, according to the affidavit. The witnesses cited in the arrest affidavit include several of Sweat's family members, including his father, as well as the two victims' relatives and the Glock gun company. District Attorney Max Cook, whose jurisdiction includes Creek and Okfuskee counties, said Friday that he has filed court documents requesting that Sweat be eligible for the death penalty if found guilty of murder in any of these killings. "We feel that we are in an appropriate position to go forward in this case," Cook said Friday, referring to the case of the two girls. Neighbors and relatives described Taylor and Skyla as nearly inseparable, often playing together after school, riding their bikes and sleeping at each others' houses. They were at Taylor's house the night of June 8, when they set off about 5 p.m. for a walk down the road. Soon thereafter, Taylor's grandfather made a futile attempt to call her on her cell phone. He found the two girls about 30 minutes later, lying side-by-side in a ditch about a quarter-mile from the home, police said. Six weeks after the murders, Oklahoma authorities released a 911 tape in which a breathless, nearly hysterical woman -- identified only as a family member of one of the victims -- is heard screaming, "Somebody killed two girls. They went for a walk, and now they are both down here dead. ... My granddaughter and her friend," the woman said on the tape. "Help me. Please!" On September 30, a $5,000 reward was offered for information on "the Glock .40 model 22 handgun used in the Weleetka girls' homicides," the state investigation bureau noted on its website. A serial number was given for that weapon, one of two linked to the girls' deaths. Ballistics tests determined that the .40-caliber shell casings found at the crime scene, matched those found on the property of Curtis Sweat, Kevin's father, the affidavit said. Investigators determined the serial number of the gun, which had been sold to Sweat. In his September interview, the suspect admitted that he'd purchased the Glock .40 gun in 2007. Authorities on Friday reiterated their plea for the public's help in tracking down this firearm, which they said Sweat may have tried to sell in March at a Tulsa gun show. Two photos of the suspect were also released: one taken around the time of the Weleetka killings and the other a mug shot after he was charged in his girlfriend's death. "We hope that, by releasing (those photos), it will spark someone's memory of seeing Mr. Sweat around the scene of (Taylor and Skyla's) murder," Florence said.

Infanticide!

June 22, 2011 SACRAMENTO, CA – In what police say is an extremely rare and disturbing case, a Sacramento woman was arrested this morning for allegedly killing her 6-week-old daughter in March by placing her in a microwave oven. Ka Yang, 29 (pictured left) was arrested at her Sacramento home this morning and charged with homicide after a three-month investigation into what caused unusual burns on the child, Mirabelle Thao-Lo, who was found dead on the afternoon of March 17. Sacramento police spokeswoman Laura Peck said there have been only three previous cases involving a child being burned in a microwave, and that detectives studied those cases and consulted with medical experts and pathologists before making the arrest. “It was a lengthy investigation to determine how these burns occurred,” Peck said. “When the officers arrived on scene they immediately saw there were unexplained injuries because of the burns. That led to this very lengthy, involved investigation to determine how these unusual and rare injuries occurred.” The infant’s fourth-degree burns were among the worst investigators at the Sacramento County Coroner’s Office had seen, coroner’s spokesman Ed Smith said. “The child was apparently killed by the burning of the tissue,” Smith said. “I don’t know if they can say how long baby was in the microwave.” Yang has three other children, all boys ages 7 and younger, and they were removed from the home that day, police said. The mother remained under suspicion while detectives studied previous cases in Texas, Virginia and Ohio. Peck said the Texas case involved a Galveston child who survived being placed inside a microwave. A second case in Dayton, Ohio, involved the 2005 death of a 4-week-old baby and resulted in a guilty verdict and life sentence last month for the baby’s mother. The 1999 death of a 1-month-old Virginia baby resulted in a five-year sentence for the mother. Peck said the rarity of such cases contributed to the length of time between Mirabelle’s death and today’s arrest. “That’s why it took so long,” she said. “Normally, we make an arrest within a few days. But in a situation like this where we had to do so much analysis, it took some time for us to piece together.” Jail records show Yang is still in the process of being booked on charges of murder and assault resulting in the death of a child under 8.
There have been three other known cases of babies being burned inside microwaves before today’s arrest of Ka Yang, including: — The September 1999 death of 1-month-old Joseph Lewis Martinez in New Kent County, Va. The baby was found in the oven and his mother, Elizabeth Renee Otte, told authorities she became confused during an epileptic seizure and placed the boy in the microwave instead of a bottle of milk. She was charged with murder and in 2000 pleaded guilty to involuntary manslaughter and was sentenced to five years. — The August 2005 death of 4-week-old Paris Talley in Dayton, Ohio. Talley’s mother, China Arnold, stood trial three times before her conviction last month on charges of aggravated murder. The jury in the case recommended a life sentence. — The May 2007 injury of 2-month-old Ana Mauldin, who suffered burns on her left ear and arm after being placed inside a microwave oven for about 10 seconds in a Galveston, Texas, motel. The girl’s father, Joshua Mauldin, originally told authorities the child had been injured through by sunburn or scalding water. He was convicted in 2008 of injuring a child and sentenced to 25 years.

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“Another Nigger fried. No big deal.”

-- April 16, 2011, Statement by New York City Police Officer Michael Daragjati, boasting of his false arrest of another African-American male.

Top News Story!

Posted: February 18, 2013 at 12:06 AM - Updated: November 3, 2013 | 08:22 pm PDT

 photo Officers_Duren_Williams_zps849b40b6.jpg

Georgia -- Two DeKalb County Police Officers based at the Tucker Precinct are among 10 metro Atlanta law enforcement officers arrested by Federal Agents on Feb. 12 for protecting drug dealers during a drug trafficking sting, according to an official statement released Wednesday.

Officers Dennis Duren and Dorian Williams (pictured above, center) both assigned to the Uniform Division at the Tucker Precinct, have been placed on administrative leave with pay, pending investigation results.

Duren has been employed by the Department since Dec. 9, 2002 and Williams since Dec. 31, 2007.

“It is incomprehensible why these officers chose to aid and abet these criminals when they are sworn to protect our community from such offenders. These officers do not reflect the character of the hundreds of DeKalb County police officers that wear the badge. Their alleged actions only assist in eroding the public’s trust in those that honorably serve and that is truly disheartening,” said Interim Police Chief Lisa Gassner.

Original article:

A Tucker man has been charged in a corruption case involving law enforcement personnel from agencies throughout metro Atlanta, according to United States Attorney Sally Yates.

Jerry Mannery, 38, was arrested as part of a sting operation against officers who are alleged to have taken thousands of dollars in payouts. They have been charged with crimes including assisting with drug trafficking, receiving illegal payouts and using firearms during the commission of a crime.

The U.S. Attorney's office stated:

Between January and February 2013, DeKalb County Police Officer Dorian Williams, working together with Mannery (and Shannon Bass, 38, of Atlanta) provided protection for what he and Mannery believed were three separate transactions in the Atlanta area that involved multiple kilograms of cocaine.

Williams and Mannery accepted cash payments totaling $18,000 for these services. During the transactions, Williams was dressed in his DeKalb County Police uniform and carried a gun in a holster on his belt, and he patrolled the parking lots in which the undercover sales took place in his DeKalb Police vehicle.

During a meeting between the three transactions, Williams allegedly instructed Bass to remove any cocaine from the scene if Williams had to shoot someone during the upcoming sale. In another meeting, Williams suggested that future drug transactions should take place in the parking lot of a local high school during the afternoon, so that the exchange of backpacks containing drugs and money would not look suspicious.

Williams and Mannery are each charged with conspiring to commit extortion by accepting bribe payments and attempted possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine.

Meth Rage!

Posted: October 26, 2012 | 12:05 pm - Updated: October 27, 2012 | 12:22 am PDT

Riverside, CA -- A California Highway Patrol officer was in stable condition Friday after being repeatedly stabbed in his back, arms, face and eye by a man he was trying to stop from climbing the fence of a freeway overpass in Riverside. The incident unfolded when the CHP responded to a 911 call Thursday at 9:51 p.m. that a man was climbing an overpass fence on La Sierra Avenue at Highway 91 in Riverside. The caller believed the man was going to jump onto the freeway, according to Riverside police Sgt. David Amador.

Amador said the CHP officer, whose identity was not released, grabbed Javier Hernandez Rios’ legs. The suspect then allegedly produced a medium-sized pocket knife and began stabbing the officer. An off-duty Riverside police officer and an off-duty San Bernardino County sheriff’s sergeant passing by in separate vehicles both stopped to assist, and the suspect allegedly attempted to stab them but missed, Amador said. The suspect stopped resisting and was handcuffed after a second CHP officer arrived and shot a rubber bullet at him, Amador said.

Amador said police investigators suspect Rios was high on methamphetamines and possibly heroin, inducing paranoia that drove him to climb the freeway overpass fence. “We initially thought he was trying to commit suicide but we no longer believe that,” Amador said. “We don’t believe he has any mental problems; we think he was under the influence of drugs.” Amador said Rios appeared to be a habitual drug user who was unemployed and lived in a motel with his wife. He has a criminal history of domestic violence, Amador said.

The CHP officer sustained nine stab wounds and was scheduled to undergo surgery Friday on his eye, Amador said. Rios was treated for minor injuries sustained during the alleged altercation.

The suspect was lucid during the interview and told investigators he was trying to get away from what he thought were police following him all day, Amador said. Rios, 45, was booked into the Riverside County jail on suspicion of mayhem and attempted murder of a peace officer. He also was charged with assault with a deadly weapon on a peace officer for the attempted stabbing of two off-duty officers who intervened.

Op. Feds in OakTown!

Posted: 05/29/2012 12:31:41 PM PDT - Updated: 05/30/2012 12:24:20 AM PDT

Oakland, CA -- Oakland police and federal agents announced the arrest of 60 "worst of the worst" violent criminals during a four-month undercover operation that included the seizure of 92 guns and several pounds of drugs. The operation included 44 undercover agents from the ATF, half of whom came from out of state, said Acting Special Agent Scot Thomasson.


In addition to the guns, agents seized 6 pounds of methamphetamine, 4 pounds of marijuana, 2 pounds of heroin and a pound of crack cocaine. Thomasson said his agents, acting on intelligence gathered from Oakland police, went after the most active shooters, drug dealers and robbery crews who were ripping off other criminals for drugs and guns at area "stash houses."

Honolulu Badboys!

Posted: Apr 10, 2012 6:26 PM PDT Updated: Apr 11, 2012 1:52 AM PDT

Screenshot (Video is below)

HONOLULU, Hawaii - A Honolulu police officer is in federal custody on federal drug possession, distribution, and conspiracy charges. Officer Michael Chu, 41 (pictured above, center & below left) is accused of being involved in a marijuana growing operation. The 13-year HPD veteran patrols Wahiawa, Mililani and the North Shore. Now he has been placed on leave without pay. He is due in court on Wednesday for a detention hearing along with another defendant in the case.

Drug Enforcement Administration agents found roughly 10 to 20 marijuana plants growing in the master bedroom, according to a criminal complaint. They also recovered documents showing that Chu and Athena Lee lived there. Chu used the address when he registered for a medical marijuana card. According to the Autele's, the Mililani house is owned by another HPD officer. The suspects moved in just a few months ago, and the home has been rented to different tenants in the past.



Authorities moved in after a security manager at FedEx seized a suspicious package on Thursday that was flown to Honolulu from California. The parcel, containing eight young marijuana plants, was being sent to an apartment at the Moana Pacific on Kapiolani Boulevard. A day later, DEA agents executed a federal search warrant of the apartment. A manager told agents that a woman by the name of Athena Lee lived in the unit and may be living with Chu. While searching the apartment, DEA agents said they recovered more than 20 marijuana plants and large amounts of US currency. Lee showed up with Chu during the raid. She was carrying $12,000 and he was holding a bag with material used to grow plants indoors, according to court documents. Chu's subsidized police vehicle in the parking garage contained a pound of marijuana and several money orders, authorities said.

According to the criminal complaint, Chu waived his constitutional rights and answered questions from authorities by stating that he just works for Lee and helps her carry things for the grow operation. Chu also told authorities that he lives in an apartment in a building on Young Street. Last July, DEA agents intercepted a package containing 14 pounds of marijuana addressed to the same unit.

Wayne and Ellen Autele have lived on Puneki Street in Mililani for 18 years. News of their neighbors being arrested came as quite a shock, especially since Wayne is a retired Honolulu police officer. "Everything was closed. You couldn't tell if anyone was home, really. Once in awhile when I get up at two in the morning you could see a light on. That was it. No noise, nothing, and no smell," said Wayne Autele. "Totally surprised. In fact, I'm embarrassed as a policeman for 32 years and I cannot even pick up a criminal right next door to me," said Wayne Autele. "I just couldn't like even imagine it. I was thinking, wow, right next door!" said Ellen Autele.

"It's scary. I didn't event think or imagine about that. Surprised," said Moana Pacific resident Keiko Ishino.

Honolulu Police Chief Louis Kealoha released the following statement:

"This is a very serious allegation, and we are cooperating with the DEA in its investigation. The HPD has also initiated its own internal administrative investigation into the alleged activity. In the meantime, the officer's police powers have been removed, and he will be placed on leave without pay. Any officer or civilian employee who violates the public trust by engaging in this type of activity should not be a part of the Honolulu Police Department."

"I'm sad it had to be a policeman, but it's one of those things. But I'm glad anytime you have criminals caught," said Wayne Autele.

As for Chu having a medical marijuana card, HPD said a permit does not exempt an employee from drug testing, and that using marijuana is a violation of policy.

Infamous Dealings!


Posted: Wed DEC 21, 2011 AT 4:13PM EST - Updated: Sat. Dec 24, 2011 2:19pm PST
"I feel so strongly, for the first time in my life, that I am truly ripe for positive reform and real achievement."

-- Cameron Douglas in a written letter to the judge asking for some compassion and looking for a break (reduction in original prison sentence). Cameron Douglas, who was already serving five years for drug dealing, has been slapped with additional time for drug possession while behind bars.



New York -- The 33-year-old son (pictured above, center-left) of Michael Douglas was sentenced to five years in prison last April on drug-dealing charges, after he was caught with half a pound of crystal meth. On Wednesday, Cameron was sentenced to an additional four-and-a-half years in prison and a $4,000 fine for drug possession while behind bars. The sentence was more than twice what prosecutors had asked for under sentencing guidelines, according to The New York Post. The judge, obviously annoyed at the situation, told Cameron that he had "blown the biggest opportunity of his life."

Apparently Cameron had been looking for a break and had written a letter to the judge asking for some compassion. In the letter, which was made public earlier this week, Cameron wrote that he was "saturated in my own shame and penitence" and begged for "the opportunity to build myself and gain the tools I need to shape my future."

"I feel so strongly, for the first time in my life, that I am truly ripe for positive reform and real achievement," Cameron said in the Manhattan federal court filing. Cameron was previously arrested in 1999 and 2007 for drug possession. At the time of his 2009 arrest, his father Michael wrote a letter pleading his son's case to the judge. "I love my son, but I'm not blind to his actions," Douglas said in the letter. "I don't want to see him break."

In addition to the jail time, Cameron also received a two-year ban on family visits and will need to undergo treatment for drug addiction while in prison.

Method to:
Missouri Madness!


Posted: Wed Dec 21, 2011 - Updated: Fri. Dec 23, 2011 1:33pm PST

pictured above, center, Methamphetamine arrest

HILLSBORO, Mo. – For more than a dozen years, the wooded hills and valleys of Jefferson County have hidden a dark side of life here: a drug problem so pervasive that some people call this rural area "Metherson County." Methamphetamine has a tight grip on this county south of St. Louis, says Cpl. Timothy Whitney of the Jefferson County Sheriff's Department, who manages a county drug task force. Jefferson County leads the state in meth lab seizures — a sign, he says, of aggressive enforcement as well as the scope of its problem. Through Nov. 28, there were 6,915 seizures of meth labs, equipment and dump sites nationwide: Missouri led all states with 1,744. So far this year, there have been 234 seizures in Jefferson County.


Top states for seizures of methamphetamine labs¸ equipment and dumpsites, Jan. 1-Nov. 28:

1. Missouri 1,744
2. Kentucky 770
3. Indiana 661
4. Oklahoma 659
5. Illinois 481`
6. Michigan 293
7. North Carolina 277
8. Iowa 260
9. Mississippi 259
10. Arkansas 232

Source: El Paso Intelligence Center, led by the Drug Enforcement Administration and staffed by 15 federal agencies to track transnational crime


Through the end of November, there were 75 drug-related misdemeanor and 340 felony arrests, many prompted by anonymous tips. "We have no bigger problem than most of the counties in Missouri," Whitney says, but its team approach leads to more busts. Meth arrived in Jefferson County around 1998, Whitney says. Once people got hooked, they started making, or cooking, it. It's harder to find meth labs here because there are no big-scale manufacturers, just hundreds of individual "mom and pop" cooks, he says. There is, however, a broad network of people who buy medications containing pseudo-ephedrine and sell it to the cooks, a practice called smurfing, Whitney says. In the past three years or so, young heroin users have begun smurfing to make money so they can buy heroin. A box of Sudafed that costs $8 or $9, he says, can be sold to meth cooks for $100, which is enough for 10 small heroin doses. Whitney expects almost 30 heroin overdose deaths this year in this county of 219,000.

pictured above, center, Methamphetamine and test kit

Meth continues to plague communities across the nation despite getting scant attention, says one University professor. "You'd think there's no meth problem, he says, but in many economically depressed rural areas it's still used "to cope with … difficulty and poverty." A family medicine professor says the nation "is not yet past the chapter on methamphetamine." As the problem persists, he says, budget woes are shrinking resources to address the problem. "There's just an air of desperation that's out there," he says.

Whitney's task force has nine investigators, down from 12 in 2005, and it will lose two more Jan. 1 when a federal grant that subsidizes task force salaries expires. "The problem is going up, but the manpower is going down," Whitney says. Jefferson County was the first in Missouri to end over-the-counter sales of cold and allergy remedies containing pseudo-ephedrine, a key meth ingredient, but neighboring St. Louis County has no restrictions. Under state law, people can buy up to 9 grams of pseudo-ephedrine every 30 days. Until there's a statewide requirement that those medicines can be sold only with a prescription, Whitney says, the battle against meth labs won't be won. Law enforcement officials began tracking another trend in 2007 that made busting meth cooks even more difficult: a "one pot" method. The drug is mixed in a 2-liter soda bottle, often in moving cars. When the process is complete, the leftover toxic materials are tossed out the car window.

Oregon and Mississippi have reported dramatic decreases in meth lab seizures since laws requiring prescriptions for all pseudo-ephedrine sales were enacted. The Missouri House passed a similar bill this year; it died in the state Senate.

Meth use is down nationwide, according to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, released in September by the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. The number of people who said they had used meth in the past month fell from 731,000 in 2006 to 353,000 in 2010.

The social consequences of Jefferson County's meth problem are dire, says Circuit Court Judge Darrell Missey, who presides over family court. "I look at my job like I'm in the emergency room," he says. At a time of shrinking public resources, Missey wishes there were money for an in-patient treatment center for girls to match the existing one for boys and a "recovery school" to transition students coming out of treatment. The community is committed, he says, but "the question is always about the money." Missey says the community won't stop fighting drugs, with or without government funds. "We're just going to have to be creative," he says.

American Air 'Lines'!


Posted: Thurs. December 8, 2011 - Updated: Fri Dec 23, 2011 02:14pm PST

When federal investigators announced they had broken up a cocaine-trafficking ring, the crime boss was not a member of a Mexican cartel or the Mafia. The ringleader was Victor Bourne (pictured left) a low-wage baggage handler for American Airlines at Kennedy International Airport. And his associates in the enterprise were other airline employees: baggage handlers and crew chiefs who delivered contraband while they delivered luggage to the baggage-claim area. Their cunning provided luxury watches, cars, tuition for their children and expensive vacations. Now they face prison.

For passengers, dealing with luggage issues has long been an annoyance of air travel. Bags can get lost or damaged, heightened security has made carry-ons less convenient and most airlines now charge travelers to check luggage. But all of that may pale to what happens outside the view of the flying public.


Testimony at Mr. Bourne’s trial in Federal District Court in Brooklyn during September and October revealed a culture of corruption among some baggage handlers at Kennedy. They stowed drugs in secret panels inside planes; stole laptops, lobsters and fine clothing flown as freight; and rifled through passengers’ belongings for perfume, liquor and electronics. “‘Everybody did it.’ That’s a line that a lot of the witnesses said,” recalled Rebecca Grefski, a juror at Mr. Bourne’s trial, part of a case in which 12 American Airlines employees either pleaded guilty or were convicted. “Everybody was doing it.”

In September, five former Delta Air Lines employees were indicted in Michigan for smuggling marijuana from Jamaica to Detroit Metropolitan Airport. In a related case, five other Delta workers were indicted in Michigan in June.



In November 2010, four part-time baggage handlers for American Airlines were arrested on charges of stealing valuables from luggage at Philadelphia International Airport. Detectives working with airline security officials set up surveillance cameras and said they caught the workers taking electronics, cameras and jewelry from passengers’ bags. Three of them pleaded guilty, and the fourth is awaiting trial. In 2009, the last year for which there is complete data, the Transportation Security Administration received about 6,750 reports of property missing from checked baggage. Passengers reported the total value of their losses as nearly $5.3 million. Clothing was reported most often as missing. Digital cameras also disappeared with some frequency. From 2002 to 2010, American Airlines generated more such reports than any other airline.

In a statement, American noted its cooperation with Immigration and Customs Enforcement to help in prosecuting the case at Kennedy. “The overwhelming majority of American Airlines employees at our J.F.K. terminal and throughout our system are honest, law-abiding individuals who work hard every day to take care of our customers,” the airline said. Yet the testimony in Mr. Bourne’s trial suggested that a serious problem seemed to exist at American Airlines. “What percent of American Airlines employees would you say engaged in this conduct?” a federal prosecutor, Patricia E. Notopoulos, asked Matthew James, a defendant in the case who pleaded guilty and testified for the prosecution. “About 80 percent,” Mr. James answered. American Airlines, in its statement, said that “any claim of 80 percent employee involvement in such illegal activities is absurd.” Much of the action at Kennedy was centered on American Airlines flights from some warm-weather location, and the primary drug-ferrying route was Flight 1384, a daily flight from Barbados, which for much of the year arrives after dark.

Mr. Bourne, a native of Barbados who prosecutors say had criminal connections there, bought cocaine in bulk and arranged for baggage handlers in Barbados to hide it on planes bound for New York, several American Airlines employees testified. Mr. Bourne, who is in custody, was found guilty of importing and distributing narcotics, as well as of conspiring to do so. He was also convicted of offenses involving financial transactions. He faces a maximum sentence of life in prison. His lawyer recently filed a motion to dismiss the counts on which Mr. Bourne was convicted and requested a new trial. “The witnesses on whose testimony the counts were founded could not be trusted,” his attorney said.

On Boeing 757s, the Barbadian handlers hid the bricks of cocaine among loose bags and freight. On larger 767s, they stowed the drugs in giant containers that were filled with luggage at the terminal and then loaded onto the planes. On Airbus A300s, they found hidden spaces behind the wall and ceiling panels in the cargo hold. Only the airline workers at Kennedy who were a part of the scheme knew where to look. “I would take the drugs out of the ceiling, put it in the bag, mix it up with other bags coming down the plane and send it down the belt,” said Edwin Asencio, a former baggage handler for American Airlines. If the hiding spots were secret, the practice was not. “I was bragging around the job that I was doing it, and I was trying to get my other friends involved so they could make extra money,” Mr. Asencio said.

pictured above, center, Seven kilograms of cocaine found on an American Airlines jet.

Trafficking was heaviest during the winter months, when customs agents assigned to the tarmac were less likely to leave their cars, and when baggage workers could hide some of the bricks of cocaine inside their coats. When the customs agents were looming, the baggage handlers sometimes left the cocaine on the plane and tracked it as it hopped around the country. When it returned to Kennedy from a domestic trip, the workers — taking care that customs agents were nowhere in sight — removed the drugs.

Mr. Bourne sold the cocaine he smuggled for about $18,000 a kilogram and took home the biggest share of the profits, prosecutors said. They calculated that he made several million dollars, which was passed through businesses he ran in Brooklyn and in Barbados. Handlers like Mr. Asencio worked in crews of three or four, and Mr. Bourne paid each of them from $3,000 to $5,000 each time they smuggled, they said. Mr. Bourne also paid crew chiefs, the employees who assigned the flights, about $500 each time they assigned his crews to Flight 1384. Steven Zografos, a crew chief who pleaded guilty to conspiracy to import cocaine, described the first time he was approached by a baggage handler. “He tell me his aunt was coming off the flight,” Mr. Zografos said in court, stumbling over his English. “I looked in the schedule, and I took away the flight they were supposed to have, him and his crew, and I assigned him the flight that he wanted to work.”

“At first, I thought it was a pretty expensive aunt,” he added, “but then I said, ‘Obviously something else is going on here.’ ” Before long, he kept a bottle of correction fluid next to his crew schedule. Whenever someone from Mr. Bourne’s crew approached him, he would just Wite-Out the flight that he was supposed to have, and take Flight 1384 from a crew that had it, and make the switch. Seven American Airlines employees testified against Mr. Bourne, all but one of them defendants who pleaded guilty and testified for the government. Ms. Notopoulos, who prosecuted the case with Toni M. Mele, Soumya Dayananda, Alexander A. Solomon and Tanya Y. Hill, summed up their testimony and the government’s case by calling American Airlines Terminal 8 “a cesspool of corruption.”

Even the defense lawyer for Bourne said that he believed part of the witnesses’ testimony. “It became very obvious that everyone in American Airlines’ baggage services is dirty,” the attorney said. “If they don’t steal commercial cargo on a regular basis, they are going to rifle suitcases. It is astounding the kind of valuable items they were able to steal.” The cooperating witnesses face minimum sentences of 10 years in prison, unless the prosecution recommends leniency.

“I think everyone sitting in the courtroom and sitting in the jury box was surprised about how long it went on and that it was known to everybody,” Ms. Grefski, the juror, said of the criminal activity. “You always hear about people having things stolen on airlines,” she added. “It was a little startling that they talked about stealing so naturally.”

Officials with federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the agency that led the investigation, said the inquiry into corruption among airline employees was continuing.

High Perceptions!


Posted: November 8, 2011 - Updated: Fri Dec 23, 2011 2:53pm



United States -- Recent high profile narcotics busts at the universities of Georgetown, Columbia, and Cornell, demonstrate that students at elite private schools aren't just smoking a little pot. They're using (and dealing) hard drugs like heroin—and they're getting arrested for it. Tom Workman, the fellow for the Education Department's Higher Education Center for Alcohol Drug and Prevention Program told reports that elite private schools are "more likely to enroll students whose race [is white] and [whose] favorable socioeconomic status make them more likely to engage in risky behavior such as alcohol and drug abuse; the competitive nature of such institutions also creates a high-pressure environment in which students are more prone to substance abuse." Workman notes that because pop culture promotes the stereotype that hard drugs are used by either rock stars or low income people of color, the narcotics problems at elite schools could be more pervasive than anybody realizes.



A study published November 8, 2011 in the Archives of General Psychiatry says that black and Asian teens are less likely to use drugs and alcohol than white people their age. In a survey of more than 72,000 young people conducted by Dan Blazer, a psychiatry professor at Duke Medical Center, 39 percent of white teens and 37 percent of Latinos reported having abused substances in the past year, compared to 32 percent of blacks and 24 percent of Asians. When it came to drugs alone, 20 percent of whites, 19 percent of blacks, and 12 percent of Asians reported using.

Blazer called the relatively low rate of substance abuse among black juveniles "surprising": "The public perception is that that’s not the case," he said. Also surprised should be American police, who continue to arrest black kids for drug use at far greater rates than whites. Consider this chart from the federal Office of Juvenile Justice:



In the 1990s, the juvenile black drug arrest rate was nearly three times that of whites, and in 2008 it remained almost double. The fact is that cops bust blacks kids markedly more for a crime they commit slightly less often. This is especially unfair because petty drug offenses are how thousands of black kids per year end up in the U.S. justice system. Their criminal records then haunt many of them for the rest of their lives, ruining their employment and educational opportunities and all but forcing them to turn to more crime to stay afloat.

It also doesn't help that officials at these elite (White) schools don't exactly want the word to get out that there are major drug problems on campus. After all, reputation is everything.

NFL:
National Felons League!


Posted: Fri Dec 16, 2011 12:00pm PST - Updated: Fri Dec 23, 2011 3:38pm PST

CHICAGO, IL (WCJB) — People who knew him here have become uncomfortably familiar with the details in the criminal complaint: $88,000 and marijuana found inside a car; the plan to buy up to $700,000 worth of drugs each week; Sam Hurd, the Chicago Bears receiver, their hero, accused of aspiring to become not just a drug dealer, but a kingpin, Tony Montana of “Scarface” and football’s Joe Montana all at once.

“People are dismayed,” said Al Porter, a retired teacher for whom Hurd (pictured left) was a student assistant, a man who later helped Hurd run his summer football camps here. “We don’t want to believe it. There’s got to be something we haven’t heard yet.” Porter sighed as he sipped sweet tea at a coffee shop. “Look, people can live a double life,” he continued. “Behind closed doors, you never know. It’s just. ...” His voice trailed off, into a whisper. “What they’re accusing him of, it’s not small time. It’s a drug ring.”

The Hurd family was not immune to the dangers that surrounded them. One of Hurd’s uncles, Jimmy Corbin, was arrested several times, including on felony charges for robbery and cocaine possession, according to public records. On Dec. 27, 2004, Jimmy Corbin was found dead on his front porch “with a gunshot wound to the top of his head,” according to the police report. The media quoted Hurd the next day, saying, “The street got the best of him.” Corbin was 48. His murder, laid out on a one-page incident report, remains unsolved.

In 2008, Hurd also told media sources that he owned several guns, including an M-16 assault rifle. That, too, gave locals pause. The Hurd they thought they knew told them he gave his life to Christ a few years ago. When he returned home, he carried a Bible, sang gospel, attended church on Sundays and decorated his sculptured arms with verses. When Daniel Thatcher asked how he was doing, Hurd always said, “I’m blessed.”

After he signed with the Cowboys, Hurd married his college sweetheart, Stacee Green. Jake Thatcher described the wedding — at a country club, opulent flower arrangements on the tables — as the nicest he ever attended. The couple performed a choreographed dance. Later, when Thatcher visited Hurd in Dallas, they walked around a Walmart. “You play for the Dallas Cowboys, and nobody knows who you are,” Thatcher said he told his friend. To which he said Hurd responded, “Not yet.”

He became widely known this month, but not in the way anyone expected. In the criminal complaint, which quotes an undercover agent and a confidential informant, Hurd is described as an aspiring drug lord who moved four kilograms of cocaine a week in the Chicago area but wanted more. Hurd faces up to 40 years in prison and a $2 million fine. The United States attorney’s office in Dallas has 30 days to present its case to a grand jury for indictment.

Mon. Dec 19, 2011 2:29pm

CHICAGO, IL (WCJB) — Chicago Bears receiver Sam Hurd was in federal custody on Thursday, charged with trying to set up a drug-dealing network. He was arrested with a kilogram of cocaine in a sting, the authorities said. Hurd was arrested Wednesday night after meeting with an undercover agent at a Chicago restaurant, according to a criminal complaint that says he was first identified as a potential drug dealer over the summer as the N.F.L. lockout neared an end. Hurd told the agent that he was interested in buying 5 to 10 kilograms of cocaine and 1,000 pounds of marijuana each week to distribute in the Chicago area, the complaint said. He said that he and a co-conspirator distributed about four kilos of cocaine every week, but that their supplier could not keep up with his demands, the complaint alleges.

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Judge Young Kim said Hurd (pictured left) would need to return to Texas to face the charges. During a hearing Thursday in Chicago federal court, Kim ordered Hurd held pending bond. The hearing will be continued Friday after prosecutors and defense lawyers discuss possible bond. Hurd was handcuffed as marshals led him to the hearing. A defense lawyer, said Thursday that he spoke with prosecutors and expected Hurd to be released Friday. The attorney said Hurd was ready to “fight the case.” According to the complaint, Hurd agreed to pay $25,000 for each kilogram of cocaine and $450 a pound for the marijuana. The United States attorney in Texas said Hurd faced up to 40 years in prison and a $2 million fine if convicted of conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute more than 500 grams, or half a kilogram, of cocaine. Hurd’s agent did not return messages. Coach Lovie Smith said the arrest was a disappointment and a “total surprise,” adding that Hurd was still a member of the Bears for now. Smith said there was no reason to believe Hurd had problems when the Bears signed him before the season. Hurd, 26, played for five seasons with the Dallas Cowboys and is in his first season with the Bears. He has played in 77 games over all, starting six and scoring two touchdowns, while contributing mostly on special teams. He has played in 12 games this year, with eight catches for 109 yards. Teammates said Thursday that they were stunned. “It’s a situation that you don’t, I don’t, want anybody to be in, especially a close friend,” said fellow receiver Roy Williams, who also played with Hurd in Dallas. The Bears agreed to a three-year deal with Hurd reportedly worth up to $5.15 million, including a $1.35 million signing bonus and base pay this season of $685,000.

Intoxicated Indictments!

Posted: Tues. December 20, 2011 9:05 PM PST - Updated: Wed Dec 21, 2011 04:00pm PST OAKLAND, CA (WCJB) — A former Contra Costa County sheriff’s deputy is due to appear before a federal judge in Oakland Feb. 7 for the setting of the next dates in his prosecution on charges of so-called “dirty DUI” arrests. Stephen Tanabe (pictured above, center) 48, of Alamo, was indicted by a federal grand jury last week on four charges accusing him of aiding former private investigator Christopher Butler in arranging the drunken driving arrests of three husbands in divorce cases. He pleaded not guilty to the charges before U.S. Magistrate Laurel Beeler on Monday. Beeler granted him bail of $400,000 and ordered him to return to the court of U.S. District Judge Saundra Armstrong Feb. 7 for the setting of future dates, including a possible trial date. The four charges in the Dec. 15 indictment are one count of conspiring to extort under color of official right, or under his position as an officer, and three counts of extortion under color of official right. The indictment alleges that Butler gave Tanabe cocaine and a firearm in exchange for his help in making the arrests of three husbands or ex-husbands of women who were clients of Butler and were in the midst of divorce or child custody disputes. Butler allegedly arranged for an undercover employee to make plans to meet each victim at a bar. Butler would then “direct the employee to entice the target to drink alcohol until he was intoxicated, and have a police officer waiting outside the bar to stop and arrest the target for drinking under the influence,” the indictment alleges. Tanabe allegedly personally made two of the arrests on Jan. 9 and 14 of this year. In a third case in Nov. 2, 2010, he allegedly arranged for another deputy sheriff to wait outside the bar and make the arrest while Tanabe remained inside the bar “monitoring the alcohol intake of the target,” according to the indictment. Tanabe’s defense attorney was not available for comment Tuesday. The prosecution grew out of a Contra Costa County law enforcement scandal that began with an investigation of stolen drug evidence and expanded to a probe of alleged drug sales, theft, bribery, possession of illegal weapons and prostitution. Butler, former Central Contra Costa County Narcotics Enforcement Team (CNET) commander Norman Wielsch and former San Ramon police officer Louis Lombardi have previously been charged in federal court. They and Tanabe also face state court charges filed by the Contra Costa County District Attorney’s Office and are scheduled to have a preliminary hearing in that case on March 5. Butler and Wielsch were federally indicted in August on charges of selling methamphetamine and marijuana, stealing from a federally funded program and extorting payments from employees running an illegal massage parlor that Butler and Wielsch allegedly established. They are due to appear before Armstrong in Oakland on Jan. 24. Lombardi, who was assigned to work with CNET between 2005 and 2009, was charged in a criminal complaint filed in May and revised in October with possessing a stolen gun, selling marijuana and methamphetamine and depriving unnamed victims of their civil rights. He previously pleaded not guilty but is scheduled to enter a change of plea before Armstrong on Jan. 26. Butler is identified only by his initials in Tanabe’s indictment, but was identified by name in an affidavit filed in the state court case by Contra Costa County Sheriff’s Detective Sgt. Jason Vorhauer in March. That affidavit alleged that two deputies told investigators they aided Butler and Tanabe in the Jan. 14 and November 2010 “dirty DUI” arrests. The alleged victim in the Jan. 14 arrest was identified as Mitchell Katz, owner of the Mitchell Katz Winery in Pleasanton, when Katz filed a federal civil rights lawsuit on Dec. 1 against Contra Costa County; his estranged wife, Alicia Spenger; Tanabe; Butler and others. Katz, a Livermore resident, contends in the lawsuit that he was lured to a Danville bar on Jan. 14 by Carl Marino, a Butler employee who was posing as the producer of a television reality show. The lawsuit alleges that Katz was surrounded at the bar by four other women who claimed they were familiar with his winery but were also allegedly employed by Butler. Katz was pulled over and arrested by Tanabe when he left the bar. Katz says in the lawsuit that he was later told by Marino in an e-mail in March that the operation was a “set up” and that Marino had told the U.S. Department of Justice about the alleged scheme. Also in March, county prosecutors declined to file any DUI charges against Katz, telling Katz’s defense lawyer in a letter that the arrest was illegal because Katz “”appeared to be the victim of an intentional conspiracy to entrap targeted victims of Tanabe’s accomplice, Christopher Butler.” The lawsuit is pending in federal court in Oakland.

The 'Norm'!

Posted: Thurs. December 15, 2011 12:14 PM PST - Updated: Wed Dec 21, 2011 04:37pm PST WALNUT CREEK, CA (WCJB) – A disgraced former police commander was back in state court Thursday morning, along with several other co-defendants, facing state charges from the Contra Costa District Attorney’s office, despite federal officials taking over the case six months ago. Norman Wielsch (pictured below, left) of the now-defunct Contra Costa County Narcotics Task Force, appeared before Judge William M. Kolin in a Walnut Creek courtroom at 8:30 Thursday morning. Christopher Butler, a private investigator, also appeared before the judge along with former Danville cop Steven Tanabe and former San Ramon officer Louis Lombardi. After a brief hearing, the judge ordered the men to return to a Martinez courtroom on February 8, 2012 for a readiness conference. The judge said a preliminary hearing will likely take place in the first week of March. Prosecutor Jun Fernandez told media sources that the case was proceeding in state court, in part, because it hasn’t been resolved in federal court and that the feds, as a matter of policy, are not sharing the proceedings of their case with the county. “We have our own independent case that needs to go forward,” Fernandez said. Wielsch’s attorney questioned the move. “Usually the state dismisses the charges because it costs a lot of money to handle a case that’s already being prosecuted at the federal level,” said the attorney. “That’s not being done here for whatever reasons. Those reasons are only known to the District Attorney of Contra Costa County.” “I’ve been told that (the Contra Costa County DA’s office) may want us to plead in the state court so they get their pound of flesh,” continued the attorney. “But whatever time my client gets in federal court will be more than sufficient to assuage any concern the state prosecutor may have. So why would they need us to plead to something? If push comes to shove, we may tell them to take us to trial.” Tanabe was charged in state court for drug and bribery crimes, but was the only one of the four who has not been charged in federal court. While Wielsch and Butler were initially brought up on 38 state charges – from reselling confiscated drugs to bribery – Contra Costa County District Attorney Mark Petersen later announced on June 3rd he was handing their cases and those of the two other cops over to the feds, citing budget constraints and conflict of interest concerns. On August 15th, a federal grand jury indicted Wielsch and Butler on narcotics charges, civil rights violations, extortion and added allegations that the two ran a brothel in Pleasant Hill. Lombardi was arraigned in federal court on October 25th for charges regarding stolen cash, jewelry and drugs. Back in June, Petersen announced, “It is my belief that the people of this county are best served if we enlist the United States Attorney’s Office and federal Bureau of Investigations” as he handed the case over to the feds. At the time, the district attorney made it clear he was not dropping any charges – leaving open the possibility of continuing a parallel prosecution in state court. All of the defendants remain free on bail.

Honolulu Police Sex, Drugs & Patrol!

POSTED: 8:35 pm HST November 16, 2011 UPDATED: 04:32 pm PST November 27, 2011 Monday night, the FBI arrested Honolulu Police Department Major Carlton Nishimura (pictured left) after a federal raid found the drug crystal methamphetamine at his home on the Waianae Coast. "I am very concerned about the seriousness of this recent allegation," said Police Chief Louis Kealoha in remarks to reporters Wednesday. The FBI says it found about 231.5 grams, or more than a half pound, of the drug (Meth) in Nishimura’s Waianae home Monday night. The Federal agents returned to Nishimura's home Tuesday night with metal detectors as well as a dog and appeared to search his garage and elsewhere in his house. Honolulu City Councilwoman Tulsi Gabbard, who chairs the council’s safety committee, said, “It is unfortunate that the actions of these very few cast a shadow over the really great work being done by officers at HPD every day.” “No one is above the law and people need to be accountable for their actions,” Gabbard said. HPD put Nishimura on unpaid leave Tuesday, after the FBI arrested him for intent to distribute crystal meth. In February, a federal grand jury indicted Nishimura for extortion in another case, with prosecutors claiming he conspired to accept bribes from illegal gambling operations in exchange for steering police away from raiding them. When Nishimura, a 30-year HPD veteran, was indicted earlier this year, he had been assigned to the legislative liaison office of the police department, which lobbies state lawmakers and members of the city council on HPD’s behalf. Sources said until Tuesday, he had been working in the Community Affairs division, on leave with pay.

Winn Sheriff!

August 5, 2011 In a photo take in 2008, Winn Parish Sheriff A.D. "Bodie" Little stands in front of the prison roster at the prison in Winnfield, La. Little and four other people on were arrested Tuesday, Aug. 2, 2011, on federal charges tied to the distribution of methamphetamine in northwestern Louisiana. SHREVEPORT, La. (WCJB) — A federal magistrate has approved house arrest for Winn Parish Sheriff A.D. "Bodie" Little, who is accused of helping his girlfriend cover up her alleged methamphetamine deals. Magistrate Mark Hornsby set Little's bond at $100,000 and said he must wear an ankle monitoring bracelet, submit to alcohol and drug testing, take a leave of absence from the sheriff's office and stay out of its administration. "You are out of the business of being sheriff, effective immediately," he told Little after hearing more than 90 minutes of testimony by a state trooper who investigated the sheriff. Little was among 11 people indicted Tuesday on charges of dealing methamphetamine in the Winn Parish and Shreveport areas. He has pleaded not guilty. His attorney says the arrest is political. Hornsby says Little's home must be thoroughly searched and monitoring equipment installed before Little can leave the Caddo Parish jail. That probably will be sometime next week, he said. Master Trooper O.H. "Hank" Haynes IV testified that a state-federal task force began investigating Little after he asked Caddo Sheriff Steve Prator last year to get a drug task force to investigate dealers in Winn Parish. "I think it's clear he wanted everyone arrested except his girlfriend," Haynes testified.

Federal Wiretaps!

POSTED: April 5, 2011 - UPDATED: August 28, 2011 - REVISED: December 28, 2011 - 10:25 AM PST When federal agents eavesdropped on the telephone conversations of several drug trafficking suspects, they heard talk of marijuana sales, money transfers and cross-country drug shipments. In August, investigators from the FBI and other federal agencies arrested people accused of being members of the alleged Compton-based drug ring that was the focus of the wiretapping. Authorities say Dion Grim, the man accused of being the group's leader, is a Front Hood Crips associate who operated a walk-up drug house in Compton and illegally shipped Xanax and other prescription medications from Los Angeles to Louisiana. Grim, in his mid-30s, is accused of controlling sales, mostly of marijuana, at a notorious walk-up drug house at 927 W. Stockwell St. in Compton. Grim is also an employee at a trash collection and recycling company. His organization also allegedly had operatives in Louisiana who sold prescription pills there and funneled funds back to Grim. During one raid of the drug house, owned by Grim, so much marijuana was flushed that almost 150 grams of pot stayed clogged in the toilet bowl, according to law enforcement records. In one incident, an associate of Grim's was pulled over on the 10 Freeway with a duffel bag from Waste Management, the sanitation company where Grim works. Law enforcement records say the black bag contained 4,200 Xanax pills and 13 single-pint bottles of codeine with promethazine, also known as "sizzurp" or "purple drank." While eavesdropping on the wiretaps, the Feds also detected something far more surprising: the voice of a Los Angeles County sheriff's captain. In April, 2011, Captain Bernice Abram, who was, at the time, the commanding officer in charge of the department’s Carson station, was put on leave after federal authorities notified LASD higher ups, that Abrams voice may have been heard on an FBI narcotics wiretap. Los Angeles Law enforcement sources have confirmed that Bernice Abram (pictured left) who is in charge of the sheriff's Carson station, was put on leave after federal authorities notified sheriff's officials that their captain may have been heard on the narcotics wiretap. In an interview with media sources, Sheriff Lee Baca would say only that the decision to place Abram on leave was spurred by "concerns presented from outside the department … and inside." "I know it's sensitive enough for her not to be working while we look into it," the sheriff said. Abram has been on leave since April, along with her niece, a sheriff's custody assistant named Chantell White. Abram said in a brief interview that she didn't know why she was on leave. She also said she'd never heard of Grim. Her niece referred all questions to Sheriff's Department headquarters. Investigators from both the FBI and the Sheriff's Department spent several hours inside Abram's Carson station Aug. 9. An FBI spokeswoman declined to say whether the agency is investigating Abram or to provide additional details. The captain is on leave with pay pending the outcome of the internal probe. Since 2009, Abram has been in charge of policing the city of Carson and the unincorporated areas of Torrance and East Rancho Dominguez. She started at the Sheriff's Department in 1987 and has held various posts there, including with the Special Victims Bureau and at the Compton and Century stations. According to a department release, she was named woman of the year by the Anti-Defamation League for "combating hate." She lists a local rabbi as her spiritual advisor, according to the bio.

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Movie Intermission!

Superfly Untold story of Frank Lucas


Description: This is the true-life story that takes you deep inside the heroin game. With the first hand testimony of those who knew him and those who prosecuted him. This is an epic story of business, excess, greed and revenge. Along with Nicky Barnes, he was one of the most powerful black drug kingpins in New York City history. (Runtime: 01:02:00)

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