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"Another One!"



Marysville, Seattle, USA -- Jordan Luton was finishing his lunch in the cafeteria at Washington state's Marysville-Pilchuck High School on Friday when he heard it -- a loud bang. Then there was another. And another. And another. And another. What he saw was freshman Jaylen Fryberg go up to a table with students, "came up from behind ... and fired about six bullets into the backs of them," Luton told media sources. "They were his friends, so it wasn't just random." More News @Corrupt Justice™ from More videos @The Attorney Depot™ and Follow us @Twitter Check our Editor's Reading List on Scribd.

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Saturday, July 25, 2009

Massachusetts: America's Other South



«• July 26, 2009 •»

JANESVILLE - A Rock County sheriff's deputy who faces a charge of domestic disorderly conduct was arrested a second time Monday on a charge of violating a 72-hour no-contact provision. Mike L. Stalker ... is accused of causing a third party to contact his wife within 72 hours of his June 27, 2009 arrest on a charge of domestic disorderly conduct.

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Valencia Gardens!


San Francisco!

San Francisco, CA, USA (T.A.D.) -- Police officers with the SFPD engage in mutual combat and brutality tactics with unknown parties in Valencia Gardens Community Housing Complex.

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"Unspeakable Acts!"

Posted November 21, 2013 - 2:40am - Updated November 22, 2013 - 12:15 am PST

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Danvers, Massachusetts -- Phillip Chism, 14, a Massachusetts teenager charged with the murder of a popular high school math teacher, sexually assaulted the woman in what a prosecutor described as a series of "unspeakable acts." Chism was arrested last month and charged with the murder of Colleen Ritzer, 24, his teacher at Danvers High School. Ritzer's body was found on Oct. 23 in a wooded area roughly 50 feet from an athletic field behind Danvers High School. Her throat had been slashed with a boxcutter and she had been punched in the face, police officials said. An indictment released today charged Chism with murder, aggravated rape and armed robbery in connection with the savage attack. The teenager is slated to appear at Salem District Court for a court hearing Friday. The affidavit, in chilling detail, offers the first hint of a possible motive in last month's gruesome killing of the popular high school teacher.

A ninth grade student told investigators that she was in class with Chism and Ritzer after school on the day of the crime, the affidavit said. She said the teacher and Chism were talking about China but, at some point, Ritzer mentioned the student's home state of Tennessee. Chism became "visibly upset," the student said. When Ritzer noticed that Chism was upset, she changed the subject, said the unidentified student, who described Chism as "talking to himself."


According to court documents, Chism followed Ritzer into a bathroom after he pulled on gloves, an act that was captured on a school security camera. He moved her body out of the bathroom in a blue recycle bin on wheels, the documents state. He then went home to change his bloody clothes and ate lunch at Wendy's before seeing a Woody Allen movie at Hollywood Hits, a theater not far from his Danvers home which he shares with his mother and two younger sisters, according to police.

The affidavit includes testimony from eyewitnesses as well as a school video surveillance timeline showing Chism and Ritzer in the same area of the school during the teacher's final moments.

In the video, Ritzer appears to enter a second-floor girls restroom -- apparently a faculty restroom was occupied -- and Chism, wearing gloves and red sweatshirt with the hood pulled over his head, appears to enter the restroom about a minute later, according to the affidavit.

Shortly after, a female student enters the bathroom and quickly walks out, according to court papers. She told investigators she saw the back of a person who appeared to be changing clothes. The person's rear was exposed, with clothes piled on the floor.

The video shows Chism leaving the restroom, returning later with a recycling barrel, and again leaving the restroom pulling the barrel -- this time with a black mask on his forehead, the court papers say. He pulls the barrel outside the building and toward the student parking lot. Investigators said there are what appear to be blood stains near the bathroom as well as on Chism's pants in the video. Ritzer, 24, was allegedly raped with an object and had her throat slashed. A handwritten note found next to her body said, "I hate you all."

On the night of Oct. 22, both Ritzer and Chism were reported missing.

Essex County prosecutors said it was a brutal assault, according to the indictment released today. Chism allegedly raped Ritzer "with an object" and stole her underwear, iPhone and credit cards after the murder, said Essex County District Attorney Jonathon Blodgett in a statement. Chism was arrested and charged with first degree murder as an adult at 5 a.m. Oct. 23 and Ritzer's body was found a short time later. "The indictments returned today detail horrific and unspeakable acts," Blodgett stated. "This is the first step in a long process to secure justice for Ms. Ritzer and her family." Blodgett said Chism will be arraigned on the additional charges of rape and armed robbery but no date has been set.

Chism pleaded not guilty at his arraignment on the murder charge last month. Chism's lawyer could not be immediately reached.

Bad Lawyering, or ...?

Posted: November 21, 2013 - 12:42pm - Updated: November 21, 2013 - 09:12 pm PST

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Martha Moxley is shown at age 14 in an 1974 photo. Moxley was slain Oct. 30, 1975. Michael Skakel's conviction in her death was set aside and new trial ordered Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013, by Connecticut judge Thomas Bishop, who ruled that Skakel's trial attorney failed to adequately represent him when he was found guilty in 2002.

STAMFORD, Conn. — Kennedy cousin Michael Skakel was granted bail Thursday and expected to be released from prison while prosecutors in Connecticut appeal a ruling giving him a new trial in the 1975 slaying of neighbor Martha Moxley.

Skakel, the 53-year-old nephew of Robert F. Kennedy’s widow, Ethel, touched his hand to his chest and looked back at his supporters in the courtroom, his brothers among them, as the judge set bail at $1.2 million. He has been in prison more than 11 years on a sentence of 20 years to life but was expected to be freed shortly after the hearing in Stamford Superior Court.

As conditions of the bail, the judge ordered that Skakel live in Connecticut and wear a GPS tracking device.

“He’s one of the most recognized faces of America, so he’s not going anywhere,” defense attorney Hubert Santos said, noting that Skakel always showed up for court appearances. Santos said after the hearing ended that Skakel was “very happy” about the outcome.

A judge ruled last month that Skakel’s trial attorney, Michael Sherman, failed to adequately represent Skakel in 2002 when he was convicted in Moxley’s bludgeoning with a golf club in wealthy Greenwich when they were both 15. Judge Thomas Bishop said Sherman failed to locate a witness who backed up Skakel’s alibi that he was at his cousin’s house the night of the murder and failed to find a man who challenged a star witness’s claim that Skakel confessed.

“This is the first step in correcting a terrible wrong,” the Skakel family said in a statement. “We look forward to Michael being vindicated and justice finally being served.”

Outside court, Moxley’s brother, John, and mother, Dorthy, said they disagreed with the bail decision, continue to believe Skakel killed Martha and are confident he will be convicted again at a new trial.

“I’m disappointed. … I guess we knew that the day would come,” Dorthy Moxley said. “I wasn’t completely destroyed, but I wish it didn’t happen.”

Added John Moxley, “We have nothing to say to Michael.”

Robert Kennedy Jr., who campaigned to overturn Skakel’s conviction, had said this week that he felt “pure joy” that his cousin was expected to be released. Skakel has seen his son only a handful of times since he was sent to prison, he said.

“Everybody in my family knows that Michael is innocent,” Kennedy said Tuesday. “He was in jail for over a decade for a crime he didn’t commit. The only crime that he committed was having a bad lawyer.”

Santos had argued that Skakel should be released immediately, saying that the ruling makes him an innocent defendant awaiting trial and that he was not a flight risk. Santos also argued prosecutors were highly unlikely to win their appeal, a contention prosecutors dispute.

The case was considered a big challenge for prosecutors because of issues including the age of the crime and the lack of forensic evidence. Michael Skakel was convicted after a trial that focused on testimony that he confessed or made incriminating statements over the years.

Both Sherman and prosecutors defended his handling of the case.

Skakel’s older brother, Thomas, was an early suspect in the case because he was the last person seen with the victim, and Bishop said in his ruling that Michael Skakel’s defense should have focused more on Thomas.

Drug-Induced Fraud!

Guilty!

Posted: 4:32 PM EST, Fri November 22, 2013 - Updated: 5:32 PM PST, Fri November 22, 2013

Massachusetts (WCJB) -- Annie Dookhan, 36, a former Massachusetts crime lab chemist, was sentenced Friday to three to five years in prison after pleading guilty to 27 counts of mishandling evidence, affecting hundreds, and perhaps thousands, of criminal cases. Dookhan was arrested last year, accused of cutting corners by visually identifying alleged drug samples instead of performing chemical tests, and then altering the samples to cover up the practice. Dookhan also was accused of falsely claiming, while testifying as an expert witness at a criminal trial, that she had a master's degree in chemistry from the University of Massachusetts. Authorities arrested Dookhan at her home in Franklin in September 2012. Dookhan pleaded guilty Friday to tampering with evidence, perjury, obstruction of justice and falsely claiming to holding a master's degree. An investigation revealed that not only did Dookhan not have a master's degree, but she never took master's-level classes, prosecutors said.

A defendant's conviction was overturned because of this, and authorities allege he killed someone in May, after his release. Dookhan's false testimony about her credentials in a Plymouth County drug trial led to the release of a man who went on to be accused of murder, Plymouth County District Attorney Timothy Cruz said. Donta Hood was convicted of a cocaine charge in 2009, in a trial in which Dookhan -- as an expert witness -- falsely testified that she had a master's degree, authorities said. Hood was released in November 2012. Cruz said he wasn't able to retry Evans on the drug charge because the evidence in the case was destroyed. Storage space had been at a premium, he said, and no one thought it would be needed again. After his release, Hood was arrested twice -- first, on a gun possession charge. While out on bail for the gun charge, he allegedly shot and killed Charles Evans in Brockton, Massachusetts, in May, authorities said. "There's no bigger pain than somebody being released that goes out and kills somebody," Cruz told media sources. Evans' family declined to comment.

Dookan said little during Friday's hearing in Boston, other than repeatedly saying, "Yes, your honor," to questions such as whether she understood the consequences of her guilty pleas. The judge also ordered that she serve two years of probation after serving the prison time.

Dookhan worked as a state chemist testing drug evidence submitted by law enforcement agencies from 2003 until March 2012, when she resigned, according to the Massachusetts attorney general's office. The attorney general's office began a criminal investigation in July 2012, after Massachusetts State Police were tipped off by Dookhan's co-workers, who alleged her work at the William A. Hinton State Laboratory in Jamaica Plain might be unreliable. The investigation revealed that Dookhan allegedly had tampered with evidence by altering substances in vials that were being tested at the state lab, allegedly to cover up the practice of routinely "dry labbing" samples. "Dry labbing" is a term used for visually identifying samples instead of performing the required chemical test. Some of the obstruction charges stem from instances in which authorities relied on tampered evidence in criminal proceedings, prosecutors said.

In August, Gov. Deval Patrick's administration said the cases of more than 40,000 defendants could be affected by Dookhan's tampering. Reviews of all the cases she handled are under way. More than 300 drug convictions involving Dookhan's tests -- conducted from 2003 to 2012 -- have been set aside since last year in Suffolk County alone, Suffolk County District Attorney spokesman Jake Wark said.

At a court proceeding earlier this year, Dookhan's lawyer said that she took shortcuts in the lab to get more cases done to help her career, never considering the negative consequences it could have for criminal cases. "The furthest thing from her mind is that this is going to ultimately cost millions of dollars, (And that) it's going to throw the entire Massachusetts criminal justice system into a tailspin," the lawyer said in court. Dookhan declined media sources request for comment about her case.

Posted: 8:34 PM EST, Wed Jan. 9, 2013 - Updated 10:34 AM PST, Mon. Jan. 14, 2013


Franklin, Massachusetts (WCJB) -- A former Massachusetts state chemist accused of misconduct in thousands of criminal cases was arraigned in two different courts last week on additional charges relating to her alleged false claims about holding a master's degree in chemistry. In one court, Annie Dookhan, 34 (pictured left) of Franklin, Massachusetts, pleaded not guilty to three counts of obstruction of justice in Middlesex Superior Court in Woburn, Massachusetts. Her next court date there is February 8 for a pre-trial conference. Later In the day, she again pleaded not guilty to two counts of obstruction of justice in Norfolk Superior Court in Dedham, Massachusetts. She allegedly "lied about the integrity of drug evidence that she analyzed," the attorney general said in a statement last year. She was released on her personal recognizance and is scheduled for another pre-trial conference there in February.

In October, police arrested the former chemist on accusations that she had lied about drug evidence she handled while working at a state police lab and pretended to hold a master's degree in chemistry from the University of Massachusetts. In December, Dookhan was indicted in Suffolk County in Boston on charges relating to alleged mishandling of evidence and obstruction. She is facing charges in several counties in Massachusetts because she had previously testified in various trials in her former official capacity as a chemist.

The former chemist has admitted to wrongdoing during her nine-year employment with the Department of Public Health. Massachusetts authorities are reviewing the sentences of 1,140 people who are in prison after being convicted with evidence at least partly provided by Dookhan. A preliminary investigation looked into every case Dookhan may have touched from 2003 until she left last March, and it is possible she touched 60,000 samples that were involved in 34,000 drug cases. Dookhan worked as a chemist in the Hinton State Lab's drug analysis unit -- which tested drug evidence submitted by law enforcement agencies across the state -- from 2003 until last March, when she resigned, according to a statement last month by Massachusetts attorney general's office.

Dookan was promoted from chemist I to chemist II in 2005. Her work was "consistently the highest in the lab among her co-workers" until June 2011, when an evidence officer discovered that 90 samples of drugs had been improperly "scanned out of the drug safe" and that Dookhan's name appeared on the control card as the primary chemist, the attorney general's office said. "The next day, when Dookhan was confronted with the log book, the initials of Gloria Philips had suddenly appeared in the book," the attorney general's statement said. Phillips was an evidence officer, according to the statement. Dookhan denied writing the initials at first, but she "later confessed to investigators" that she forged them "to cover up her misconduct," the statement said.

"There will be designated court sessions in each county to hear the cases," Chief Justice Robert Mulligan said last October in a statement. "The Trial Court is fully cooperating with the prosecutors and defense counsel who are responding to these issues."

State police were tipped off last July by Dookhan's co-workers at the William A. Hinton State Laboratory in Jamaica Plain who alleged her work might be unreliable. At the time, state police were taking over what had previously been a Department of Public Health drug laboratory, which certified random drug tests for the police departments in Norfolk, Suffolk, Middlesex and Bristol Counties, as well as for Cape Cod and the nearby islands. During the takeover, authorities learned from employees how they were afraid to verify the work of Dookhan, said a spokesman for the Executive Office of Public Safety and Security. Last July, Massachusetts State Police investigators interviewed lab employees. On August 28, Dookhan "admitted to 'dry labbing' some of the samples," the statement said. "Dry labbing" is the practice of merely visually identifying samples instead of performing the required chemical test, the attorney general said.

"It was discovered that Dookhan would assemble multiple drug samples from different cases that appeared to be the same substance. She would then perform the chemical tests on a few of the samples to verify that the samples were in fact the drug she believed they were, and if those were positive, would assume all the samples were positive without performing the necessary chemical tests," the attorney general said. Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick ordered the lab to be shut down on August 30.

Surren Dookhan, Annie Dookhan’s husband, sent a text message to George Papachristos, former Norfolk Count assistant district attorney and a noted friend of Annie Dookhan, calling her a liar, according to media sources. According to the source: “This is Annie’s husband do not believe her, she’s a liar, she’s always lying,” Surren Dookhan texted to the prosecutor, according to an interview Papachristos gave to State Police on Oct. 3, 2012. “She is looking for sympathy and attention.”

Krawetz Kicks!

February 25, 2013

LINCOLN, R.I. — A Lincoln police officer convicted earlier this year of felony battery for kicking a handcuffed woman in the head outside the Twin River Casino has resigned from the department. Media sources reports that the Lincoln town administrator said the town had accepted an "unconditional and irrevocable" resignation from Officer Edward Krawetz (KRA'-witz). Krawetz, who was on an unpaid suspension, had been fighting to keep his job, but decided to drop his effort to remain on the force.

A state judge convicted Krawetz in January of felony battery with a dangerous weapon for kicking Donna Levesque, of Uxbridge, Mass., outside the casino. The encounter was caught on surveillance video.

In March, Krawetz was given a 10-year suspended sentence with probation.

March 27, 2012



PROVIDENCE, R.I. -- Edward M. Krawetz, the suspended Lincoln patrolman convicted of battery for kicking a handcuffed woman in the head outside the Twin River slot parlor, was imposed a 10-year suspended sentence with probation and was ordered to undergo counseling. He will serve no prison time. Superior Court Judge Edward C. Clifton convicted Krawetz, of Lincoln, on Jan. 23 after a non-jury trial during which the prosecutor asserted that Krawetz committed the felony when he kicked Donna Levesque, of Uxbridge, Mass., in the head on the evening of May 31, 2009. The incident was caught in Twin River security video.

Krawetz has filed a notice of intent to appeal to the Rhode Island Supreme Court. January 5, 2012 1:16 pm PROVIDENCE, R.I. -- Lawyers dueled Thursday over testimony of a Lincoln police officer who worked at the Twin River slot parlor with Officer Edward M. Krawetz in May 2009. Officer Russell Enos was working during the shift when the now-suspended Krawetz is accused of assaulting a handcuffed woman who had been escorted outside for disorderly conduct. Under a prosecutor's questioning, Enos said that neither he, Krawetz nor Twin River security officials felt threatened by the woman, Donna Levesque -- not before, during or after the incident in which she made a kicking motion at Krawetz. According to the prosecution, Krawetz then kicked her in the head. Under defense questioning, Enos said he thought Levesque did make contact with Krawetz when she suddenly kicked toward him.

Messy Mya funeral!

November 23, 2010
Messy Mya was well known in New Orleans as a flamboyant "bounce" MC with frequent gigs at clubs like Fusions and the Red Velvet Room. He also had a fast-growing national fan base for the raw comedy videos he posted on YouTube, with followers including many hip-hop celebrities. The rising star was murdered within hours of leaving his girlfriend's baby shower.

Prince George's County !

November 17, 2010 Nine people, including three Prince George's County police officers, were arrested Monday on charges involving drugs, guns, and black-market alcohol and cigarettes as authorities ratcheted up a sprawling corruption probe in the county. Federal agents conducted numerous searches around the county and moved to seize more than 30 homes, businesses and vehicles as part of the widening investigation into corruption in Prince George's. The nine suspects were arrested three days after County Executive Jack B. Johnson (D) and his wife were led from their home in handcuffs, accused of evidence-tampering in a probe of sweetheart land deals. Federal officials say the arrests are all connected. "This case and Friday's are among a series of related investigations," said Rod J. Rosenstein, the U.S. attorney for Maryland. He was referring to Monday's roundup of suspects and the arrests of the Johnsons on Friday, when the executive's wife allegedly flushed a $100,000 check down a toilet in their home and tried to hide $79,600 in cash in her bra as FBI agents knocked at the door of their home with a search warrant. Johnson, 61, due to leave office next month after two terms as executive, and his 58-year-old wife, Leslie Johnson (D), newly elected to the County Council, were released after their arrests. Jack Johnson was back at work Monday doing the job "the people had elected him to do," his spokesman said, adding that couple are "strong and faithful." The nine people arrested Monday were taken into custody early in the morning in an operation involving about 150 law enforcement officers who executed as many as a dozen search warrants. Among those charged are: Police Sgt. Richard Delabrer, 45, of Laurel, Cpl. Chong Chin Kim, 42, of Beltsville; and Officer Sinisa Simic, 25, of Woodbridge. A federal indictment unsealed Monday alleges that liquor store owner Amrik S. Melhi, 51, and others paid Delabrer and Kim to guard the distribution of untaxed cigarettes and alcohol in Maryland and Virginia. Melhi, the two officers and four other suspects are charged with conspiracy to commit extortion. In a separate scheme, Simic is accused of conspiring to distribute cocaine and using firearms in drug trafficking. Another of the nine suspects, Mirza Kujundzic, 30, of Woodbridge, was charged with those same offenses. The indictment, filed in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt, seeks the court-ordered forfeiture of $3.5 million in cash, 25 homes and businesses, 13 vehicles and 84 bank accounts that authorities said are associated with the alleged crimes. Melhi, of Clarksville, owns several liquor stores, including Tick Tock Liquor and Restaurant in Langley Park, where Delabrer worked off-duty as a security guard. Tick Tock is well known in the county and is one of the most lucrative liquor stores in the area. Online property records indicate that Melhi owns several homes and properties in Prince George's and Maryland. The others charged in the alleged booze and cigarettes scheme were identified as Melhi's wife, Ravinder K. Melhi, 49; Amir Milijkovic, 39, of Bowie, who owns a College Park auto glass store; Chun Chen, 34, of Bowie; and Jose Moreno, 49, of Alexandria. All were ordered held until detention hearings Tuesday and later this week. Eugene Pitroff, a lawyer, said federal agents raided his Upper Marlboro office Monday and seized records related to work he had done to help Amrick Melhi and several relatives obtain liquor licenses in Prince George's and Calvert counties. Pitroff represented Tick Tock in 2007, when Johnson, citing an increase in crime and unruly behavior, ordered a crackdown on nightclubs in the county. After negotiating with the county, club owners, including Melhi, agreed to beef up security at their establishments and install new lights and cameras. Maryland law sets caps on the number of liquor licenses that local jurisdictions can issue, meaning that most stores and restaurants obtain licenses via transfers from other stores and restaurants that are closing. Critics of the system have long said that it favors business owners who form alliances with state lawmakers and local politicians. Campaign finance records show that Amrik Melhi has donated money to several Prince George's political candidates, including Johnson. "As far as I knew, these were decent people," Pitroff said of Melhi and the relatives he helped obtained licenses. "All this stuff has come as a shock to me." Among the properties that authorities have moved to confiscate, in addition to Tick Tock, are what appear to be several liquor stores in the county, including Shop Rite Liquors in Takoma Park. Public records indicate that Shop Rite is partly owned by Karl Granzow, a former deputy fire chief in Prince George's. Granzow's home was searched in 2008 in the probe of development deals. At the time, Granzow declined to comment. As for the liquor store, Granzow's attorney, Timothy Maloney, said Granzow has a 25 percent stake in the business but is not involved in its daily operation. He said he does not think investigators are interested in his client. Prince George's Police Chief Roberto L. Hylton (pictured left) said that before Monday morning, he knew very little of the federal investigation that now includes three of his officers. "I'm outraged at the disgraceful conduct demonstrated by three of our officers who tarnished our badge for their own greed and personal gain," he said. "These individuals are just bad people that need to go away." He said that federal authorities "did not share the targets, the names of the targets with me," so he could not suspend all those involved while the investigation continues. Hylton said that officers might soon be prohibited from working part time at establishments that are not properly licensed or are known to serve too much alcohol. "We are going to go back with a process that will require each of our officers to submit a request to work at a location before they are approved," Hylton said, adding that a deputy chief will review each of the requests. "We have to really rein this back in. I think we have to address the issue of greed." Since Johnson's arrest Friday and the announcement from the chief federal prosecutor that more charges were coming, anxiety and speculation have been rampant in Prince George's. The Johnsons' arrests grew out of a four-year FBI investigation into developers and their associates suspected of "regularly providing things of value to public officials" in exchange for official favors, according to a 10-page affidavit filed with the criminal complaint. The investigation centered on alleged bribes that Jack Johnson took in exchange for helping an unidentified developer seek grant money from a federal affordable-housing program administered by the county's Department of Housing and Community Development. The developer gave Johnson cash and checks as far back as 2007, including one for $100,000, according to the affidavit.

Massachusetts!

Boston PD!

July 8, 2011 A Boston police officer at the center of one of the most notorious police brutality cases in city history used unreasonable force while arresting a man in the North End in 2009, then lied about the episode to department investigators, according to an Internal Affairs Division report obtained by local media sources. As a result, Officer David C. Williams has been placed on paid administrative leave, the Boston Police Department said, and could lose his job under Police Commissioner Edward F. Davis’s nearly 19-month-old policy of dismissing officers who lie in the line of duty, to internal affairs investigators, or in court. Williams is appealing the finding, and a hearing is scheduled for later this month. Williams was fired from the force in 1999 after being implicated in the racially charged 1995 beating of undercover police officer Michael Cox, then reinstated with nearly $550,000 in back pay after a civil service arbitration in 2005. Williams’s attorney insisted his client told the truth about the 2009 North End arrest. “He’s absolutely testified honestly and truthfully about the incident that occurred,’’ the attorney said. “Any conflicts about the incident were the result of a fast and rapidly evolving incident.’’ Michael P. O’Brien, a 30-year-old Middlesex County corrections officer, filed a civilian complaint against Williams and five other officers who arrested him on Hanover Street on March 16, 2009. O’Brien said that Williams drove his head into the sidewalk and choked him after he began recording Williams and his partner with a cellphone as the two officers responded to a minor traffic accident. Williams’s partner, Officer Diep Hung Nguyen, was cleared of three charges, including using unnecessary force, as were the four other officers involved in the arrest. Williams was cleared on four charges, including two counts of violating the rule for respectful treatment. Nguyen’s lawyer did not return calls seeking comment yesterday. Despite the findings against Williams, O’Brien said it was “a sickening feeling’’ to read the Internal Affairs Division report clearing officers of other charges. “It was like a kick in the gut,’’ he said. “I was expecting to be exonerated. I was expecting them to come out to say: ‘This is a lie. These charges aren’t true. This arrest was false.’ As happy as I am they’re charging him with something, it’s tough. It’s a knock at your credibility as a person.’’ O’Brien, of Methuen, a former National Guardsman, has filed a federal lawsuit against Williams, Nguyen, and the Boston Police Department. He alleges that he suffers from debilitating headaches and dizziness as a result of the arrest, and that his career as a correction officer and his aspirations to join the Army’s Special Forces have been “flipped upside down.’’ O’Brien was arrested after Williams and Nguyen responded to a fender-bender on Hanover St. According to police and court documents, O’Brien and two friends were in a car that backed down Hanover Street and clipped a double-parked vehicle. In his incident report, Williams wrote that O’Brien “became very unruly’’ and “pushed Officer Nguyen.’’ But according to the Internal Affairs report obtained by the Globe, Williams, who is 6-foot-3 and 242 pounds, used an “unreasonable amount of force’’ to arrest O’Brien, who was 5-foot-9 and 160 pounds at the time. The report also found that Williams, 48, was “untruthful in his statements’’ when interviewed by department investigators. The Internal Affairs Division ruled that Nguyen, 33, used “reasonable and proper force’’ to arrest O’Brien and that Nguyen properly arrested O’Brien for disorderly conduct. The report also found that while Nguyen directed profanity at O’Brien and an unnamed witness to the arrest, investigators were “unable to prove or disprove’’ a violation of department rules mandating respectful treatment of civilians. O’Brien said he did not see the other four officers who took part in the arrest and does not know how they became part of the investigation. The notice of findings, signed by Superintendent Kenneth Fong of the Police Department’s Bureau of Professional Standards, provides no details about how investigators came to their conclusions, nor does it shed light on how Williams was untruthful during the internal investigation. O’Brien and his attorney, Howard Friedman, said he could not discuss the case or his lawsuit because the information is being kept secret at the urging of the police under a court order. But O’Brien was willing to say what punishment he believes Williams deserves. “He should be fired; he should have been fired a long time ago,’’ O’Brien said. “I was astonished that someone with such a history could be working on the Police Department.’’ Under department rules, Williams could accept the internal affairs findings and submit to Davis’s discipline. However, Williams is challenging the findings, which means the department has to conduct an administrative hearing before the commissioner or his designee. According to the department’s rules and procedures, any recommendations by the hearing board will not be binding on the police commissioner. Williams, who joined the department in 1991, was among a group of officers found responsible for the vicious 1995 beating of a plainclothes officer, Michael Cox. At the time, Williams and the others said they mistook Cox, who is black, for a murder suspect they were chasing. Cox was nearly beaten to death on a dead-end street in Mattapan. Williams and two other officers were fired for their role in the episode, although none were criminally charged. The Boston Police Department took Williams back after a civil service arbitrator ruled he was dismissed without just cause. Cox, now a deputy police superintendent, sued the city and won $817,000. He later sued Williams after Williams was reinstated and reached an out-of-court settlement with him.

Cambridge, Mass.

July 26, 2009 “Cambridge police acted stupidly in arresting somebody when there was already proof he was in own home.”
-President Barack Obama - July 2009
On July 15, 2009, prominent black scholar, Professor Dr. Henry Louis Gates Jr. was arrested at the two-story home he rents from Harvard. Professor Gates is the director of Harvard’s W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African-American Research. He is Summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Yale. Dr. Gates is also a MacArthur "genius grant" recipient. He is an acclaimed historian, Harvard professor and PBS documentarian. Dr. Gates was one of Time magazine's "25 Most Influential Americans" in 1997. He is the Holder of 50 honorary degrees. Professor Gates had returned from a trip to China on Thursday with a driver, when he found his front door jammed. He went through the back door into the home — which he leases from Harvard — shut off an alarm and worked with the driver to get the door open. The driver left, and Gates was on the phone with the property’s management company when police first arrived. Cambridge police say they responded to the well-maintained two-story home near campus after a woman reported seeing “two black males with backpacks on the porch,” with one “wedging his shoulder into the door as if he was trying to force entry.” By the time police arrived, Gates was already inside. Police demanded that Gates (pictured left) show identification. Gates was arrested shortly afterward for alleged disorderly conduct, a charge that was later dropped. Crowley said Professor Gates “exhibited loud and tumultuous behavior.” He was released later that day on his own recognizance. An arraignment was scheduled for Aug. 26, 2009.
Boston police officer was suspended Wednesday for allegedly using a racial slur to describe black Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr.
C.J. Note: Luckily Professor Gates didn't "reach for his waistband" in his own home. Gates said he turned over his driver’s license and Harvard ID — both with his photos — and repeatedly asked for the name and badge number of the officer, who refused. He said he then followed the officer as he left his house onto his front porch, where he was handcuffed in front of other officers, Gates said in a statement released by his attorney, fellow Harvard scholar Charles Ogletree, on a Web site Gates oversees, TheRoot.com. Police say he refused to come outside to speak with an officer, who told him he was investigating a report of a break-in. “Why, because I’m a black man in America?” Gates said, according to a police report written by Sgt. James Crowley. Crowley is Racist The police sergeant accused of racism after he arrested Gates insisted that he won’t apologize. Police say Gates at first refused to display ID and then accused the officer of racism. Some of Gates’ African-American colleagues say the arrest is part of a pattern of racial profiling in Cambridge. Allen Counter, who has taught neuroscience at Harvard for 25 years [but is black], said he was stopped on campus by two Harvard police officers in 2004 after being mistaken for a robbery suspect. They threatened to arrest him when he could not produce identification. “We do not believe that this arrest would have happened if professor Gates was white,” Counter said. “It really has been very unsettling for African-Americans throughout Harvard and throughout Cambridge that this happened.” "It never would have happened — imagine a white professor, a distinguished white professor at Harvard, walking around with a cane, going into his own house, being harassed or stopped by the police. It would never happen." (Earl Graves Jr., CEO of the company that publishes Black Enterprise magazine, who was once stopped by police during his train commute to work, dressed in a suit and tie.) Death of a Homeowner (New York - July 2009) An undercover cop was wearing earphones to keep in touch with his NYPD team and didn't hear an irate Brooklyn homeowner's command to get off his stoop until it was too late, law enforcement sources said. (Alanta - November 2006) Kathryn Johnston, a 92 year old black woman, was shot 39 times as plainclothes Atlanta narcotics officers broke into her home on Nov. 26, 2006. The warrant was obtained using false information and the officers involved planted evidence afterward to cover up their lies. A history of "Southern [Police] Conduct" "'... [R]ace remains a factor in our society.'" "There is a long history in this country of African-Americans and Latinos being stopped by law enforcement disproportionately," Obama said. "That's just a fact." Boston, Massachusetts is an old city that has long been bewitched by the racist dynamics of white supremacy. The racist sagas have been seared right into the consciousness of America itself. There have been many racist policies that have intentionally undermined the black populace there. For example, in 1974 a school desegregation plan unleashed havoc as hundreds of whites morphed into angry mobs attacking black citizens. In 1989, Charles Stuart (a white man) said his pregnant wife had been shot by a "black man" who rushed up to his car. Boston police began stopping young black men with impunity, with reckless and malicious disregard for the United States Constitution (i.e., the Fourth Amendment). There was no black man; Stuart, who later jumped from a bridge and died, committed the murder himself. Stuart was implicated in the murder by his brother. In January 1995, a young black man was gunned down in a Boston eatery. A neighborhood resident dialed 911 claiming an officer had been shot. He later said it was the quickest way to get help in an inner city establishment. Four black suspects were being pursued across a 10-mile area. On a dead-end street, police believed they had cornered one of the suspects. They pummeled him before he uttered a word, using a baton, fists, and boot-laden feet. The "suspect" spurted blood, dropped to the cold ground, tried to get up, only to be beaten more. His gurgling words were unintelligible through blood and pain. The "suspect" was actually Michael Cox, a decorated undercover Boston police officer who had himself been in pursuit of the suspects, had even been in the lead chase vehicle. And who happened to be black. At least two (white police officers; one named Kenny Conley) and possibly three (one black) officers participated in Cox's beating. More than two dozen officers would eventually arrive at the scene, some who held supervisory positions. But in the follow-up investigation, no officer took responsibility for the beating. Officer Cox was lucky to have survived the vicious beating. The Cox case never became as sensational as the Rodney King beating because there was no videotape," says Rob Sinsheimer, one of Cox's trial lawyers. "But if you look at the beating, stroke for stroke, it could have actually been worse than the King beating." Suspect Description: Black male! In 1991, the infamous Los Angeles Police Department brought us the Rodney King case, in which King was viciously beaten by white police officers, a scene caught on videotape. In the 21st century--African-Americans, Latinos, and other minority citizens are still being killed by the police at disproportionately high levels. By now everyone has seen the horrific videos of a (white) Oakland BART police officer (Johannes Mehserle) shooting an unarmed Black man, Oscar Grant, while he lay face down on the ground and was fully cooperating. The man who was killed execution style was the father of a 4-year-old girl. In fact moments before he was shot he was pleading with his friends who were all cuffed up to calm down and be cooperative with police. Grant was seen begging the police officers, who had pulled tasers out and pointed them at the heads of his friends, not to shoot. For reasons unknown to us, the police officer pushed Grant to the ground. One officer (Tony Pirone) kneeled on his neck while the other officer pulled out a gun and shot him point blank in the back. The bullet went through his back, hit the ground and bounced back up and pierced his lung, killing him. Black Police Officers: N-words or Fine Upstanding Citizens?

Uncle Tom

Cambridge Sgt. Leon Lashley, an "uncle tom," black sergeant (N-word pictured next to Sgt. Crowley; giving peace sign) who was at the home of Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr. when he was arrested, says Gates "may have caused grave and potentially irreparable harm to the struggle for racial harmony." Lashley says he fully supports how his white fellow officer handled the situation. Sgt. Lashley says Gates was probably tired and surprised when Sgt. James Crowley demanded identification from him as officers investigated a report of a burglary. Lashley says Gates' reaction to Crowley was "a little bit stranger than it should have been." Asked if Gates should have been arrested, Lashley said he supported Crowley "100 percent." Throughout the country, minority police officers continue to fall victim to their trigger- and baton-happy white comrades. Some of those on the receiving end of attacks by white cops turn out to be their minority colleagues. "It happens all the time. The cover-up is unbelievable," says Ron Hampton, executive director of the National Black Police Association in Washington, D.C., a retired 24-year member of the Washington, D.C. force who has never heard of a white officer being attacked by a minority officer. "It happened to me. I was stopped, questioned--everything." (New York City - 2009) Seven weeks ago Omar Edwards, an off-duty black officer, was shot dead by a white officer who mistook him for a criminal suspect. See Video Update on Shooting. (California - November 2008) Inspector Marvetia Lynn Richardson, 41, a 14-year San Francisco police veteran who is now on unpaid leave from her job, said Antioch [Calif.] officers broke down her door last year, stunned her with a Taser and then took her to jail when she demanded they write "Tasered" on a citation for resisting arrest. Richardson, who is black, said the incident was an outgrowth of Antioch police efforts to enter homes without warrants to harass and drive African American tenants out of federally subsidized housing. Richardson owns her home and [does] not receive [any] housing assistance. Antioch police referred to Richardson during the incident as the "alleged homeowner" and "this so-called SFPD lady," the suit said. C.J. Note: Oakland (CA) Police Officer Hector Jimenez was placed on one (1) year's paid leave after gunning down two unarmed African-American males witihin a seven (7) month period of time. A large number of African-Americans are being gentrified out of Oakland. As a result of gentrification they are moving to Antioch, CA for lower rents and subsidized housing. (Philadelphia - January 1995) African-American officer Adrienne Cureton, a six-year veteran of the Philadelphia Police Department, fell victim of one of the nastiest attacks by white co-workers ever recorded. On Jan. 2, 1995, Cureton, then 26, was working her usual night shift as a plainclothes member of the juvenile division. She was taking a report on a missing 2-year-old girl when a squabble broke out in the home. Officers arriving to provide backup entered the home and proceeded to beat Cureton senseless--perhaps as many as 20 of them pummeling her with flashlights and fists as she repeatedly cried, "I'm a police officer!" Eventually a black officer put an end to the assault. "I personally believe that they saw 'black.' They grabbed me and did what they had the opportunity to do," Cureton told the Philadelphia Daily News. "It was like Rodney King--only I'm a cop. Even if I wasn't a cop, they had no right to beat somebody like that." The Cureton case is far from the only recent example of white-on-black police violence: (New York - 1994) Black New York transit officer Desmond Robinson was shot in the back four times as he lay on the ground after an unrelated shooting investigation went haywire. (Nashville, TN - Dec. 14, 1992) Black police officer Reggie Miller was choked, kneed, and eye-gouged by five officers following a routine traffic stop. (New York - November 18, 1992) Black New York City transit officer Derwin Pannell was fired upon 21 times and critically wounded while arresting a farebeater. (California - 1988) Black Oakland police officer Derrick Norfleet was working undercover when he was rammed by a patrol car and beaten by a trio of officers--two of whom sat in the same room with Norfleet at a precinct meeting two hours earlier. Oakland Police Officer Lt. Derrick Norfleet, 45, (Deceased) committed suicide at his home in Vallejo (July 2008). Norfleet was assigned to the patrol division and had been with the department for more than 22 years. The "uncle tom," Sgt. Lashley was saying, ...?

Update

2 charged in murder of editor plead not guilty
July 30, 2009 19:19 EDT OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) -- Two men charged in the murder of an Oakland journalist have pleaded not guilty. Yusuf Bey IV and Antoine Mackey both entered their pleas Thursday to first-degree murder charges in the shooting of Oakland Post editor Chauncey Bailey in August of 2007. Bey, a former leader of the now-defunct Your Black Muslim Bakery, is accused of ordering the killings of Bailey and two other men. Mackey is suspected of being the getaway driver after Bailey was shot while investigating the bakery's finances. Alameda County Superior Court Judge Morris Jacobsen said he will release the grand jury transcripts in the case and lift a gag order.

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Movie Intermission!


Génération kill épisode 2 saison 1


Description: HBO -- Generation Kill est une mini série télévisée américano-britannique produite pour HBO, basé sur le livre du même nom par Evan Wright au sujet de son expérience en tant que journaliste embarqué avec l'US Marine Corps' - épisode 2 saison 1: Sous les ordres de considérer toute irakiens portant un hostile d'armes, bravo bustes nord vers Nasiriyah. Ronge son frein tandis que d'autres mènent la lutte, le peloton obtient finalement «éclairée» dans une escarmouche violente mais réussi à Al Gharraf..
More Below

Thursday, July 23, 2009

Newark (R.I.C.O.) New Jersey - Major Corruption



«• July 23, 2009 •»


“Cambridge police acted stupidly in arresting somebody when there was already proof he was in own home,” Obama said during a prime-time news conference. “This still haunts us,” Obama said.

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• Brought to you by Corrupt Justice!


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See: Hurricane "New Orleans Police Department!"







“Another Nigger fried. No big deal.”

-- April 16, 2011, Statement by New York City Police Officer Michael Daragjati, boasting of his false arrest of another African-American male.

Top News Story!


Beijing
Images of Pre-Death!


Posted: Sun Dec 11, 2011 9:35pm EST - Updated: Mon Dec 12, 2011 9:07am PST

Beijing, China -- A series of 8-year-old photographs is currently making the rounds on the Internet in China. The photos shocked many across China: Women in their final 12 hours on death row. Taken in China's central Wuhan province in 2003, few saw these images until recently, as they spread across China's Internet, showing convicted drug traffickers preparing for death. The images show, among other things: Guards giving a prisoner her execution outfit; women being fed fresh fruit, dumplings, and - a special treat - hot pies from McDonalds; prisoners writing final letters; and women crying on the morning of their executions.

The Wuhan photos are fueling online debates that it's usually the poorest and weakest people in China who face the harshest legal punishments. Outside tallies estimate China carries out around 4,000 death sentences annually, for crimes ranging from government corruption to rape. In comparison, 46 people were executed in the U.S. last year.



"If you're executing thousands of people every year and in a very densely populated country with deep familial and kinship ties, you are generating a lot of discontent, a lot of unhappiness," said John Kamm with the Dui Hua Foundation.

For the women in the pictures, the debate comes too late. The photos end as they join a line of prisoners to face the firing squad.

Spiral Bound!


September 15, 2011



BOUND BROOK, New Jersey — After a seven-year wait for trial, long-suspended Bound Brook Police Chief Kenneth Henderson agreed to resign without admitting guilt to the criminal corruption charges. The borough council voted Tuesday night to accept the settlement, which avoids a trial on a charge of official misconduct, reimburses $150,000 to Henderson, and maintains his pension benefits. It wasn’t immediately clear if the prosecutor’s office had filed to dismiss the charges against Henderson.

Under the settlement, Henderson won’t contest an administrative charge of conduct unbecoming of an officer. His salary in 2004 was $92,750 and the $150,000 pays for his employment from Nov. 2004 through May 2006. The timing gets Henderson to 25 years service, making him eligible for full pension benefits, said borough officials.

A stay-at-home dad during his unpaid suspension, Henderson maintained his innocence, claiming he was the victim of retribution by former Somerset County Prosecutor Wayne Forrest, who has declined comment on the allegations.

Henderson, 51, said last week, "it’s disappointing how (the trial) affects your life for seven years. At the end of the day, there’s no justice."

Henderson was accused of tipping off friend and Cafe Imperial owner, Rafael Rosario, of an impending state raid on the restaurant and night club on Oct. 17, 2004.

According to authorities, the chief was at the restaurant around 9:15 p.m. when he received a call state Alcoholic Beverage Control investigators were 10 minutes away. Henderson then put on a traffic control vest and, as ABC investigators arrived, said he had been performing off-duty work controlling traffic for the club, Forrest said at the time.

The chief had been under investigation for months because of his business relationship with Rosario, which came to light that year when the prosecutor’s office conducted an efficiency study of the Bound Brook police department.

Four of the counts against Henderson were dismissed in 2007, and official misconduct charges against Rosario were dropped last year.

Bound Brook Council President Anthony Pranzatelli said the prosecution, now under a new leader, planned to drop its charges against Henderson and encouraged the borough to approve the deal.

To Pranzatelli, paying Henderson $150,000 was a safer bet than risking millions of dollars should Henderson won in trial. Mayor Carey Pilato did not vote on the deal and declined to comment because he was a witness in the case.

"We’re finally in the position to move forward and have a real chief of police," said Pranzatelli, referring to the borough’s use of an acting chief for the past seven years.

"It’s about time."

Defara Gaymon!


July 21, 2010
"[T]he only good n[igger] is a dead n[igger] and they should hang you in the town square to prevent any other n[igger] from coming in the area."

-- July 2011 Statement by Oakland Public Schools Police Chief Pete Sarna, referring to an African-American police officer.

The family of a prominent Atlanta CEO who was shot and killed during an undercover police crackdown of public sex in a New Jersey park is demanding a federal investigation, accusing the officer who said he fired in self defense of lying. DeFarra "Dean" Gaymon, (pictured left) president and CEO of The Atlanta Credit Union, had returned to New Jersey to attend his 30th class reunion at Montclair High School. Gaymon, 48 a married father of four, was in Branch Brook Park in Newark, N.J., at 6 p.m. on July 16, when he encountered the plainclothes cop. The 29-year-old male officer, who has not been identified, told the Essex County Prosecutor's office that he had gone to retrieve a pair of handcuffs he'd lost in the woods during a separate arrest in the sweep. When he bent down to pick up the cuffs, Gaymon approached and was "engaged in a sex act" alone, the officer told authorities. The officer said he placed Gaymon under arrest.

"Mr. Gaymon appeared to panic, assaulted the police officer and fled," said the statement by Prosecutor Robert Laurino. Gaymon then "repeatedly threatened to kill the officer," according to Laurino, and then "lunged at and attempted to disarm the officer while reaching into his own pocket." It was then the officer, "fearing for his life," shot Gaymon, who later died at a nearby hospital from a single gunshot wound to his abdomen.

Gaymon's family is disputing the officer's account of the shooting, saying in a statement released to Atlanta media organizations that Gaymon was a family man who was not prone to violence. "We know that the police killed an innocent man, with no history of or disposition towards violence," the Gaymon family said in their statement, according to the Atlanta Journal Constitution.



"Dean Gaymon was a nonviolent, nonaggressive and nonthreatening person his entire life," said the statement. " It would have been completely and totally against his nature to 'tussle' with a police officer, to resist authority, to assault a police officer...Words such as 'I am going to kill you' would not be uttered from him."

Repeated calls to Gaymon's sister, Kimberly Gaymon Armstrong, were not immediately returned.

Prosecutor's Office Says State Grand Jury Will Decide on Case

Katherine Carter, spokeswoman for the Essex County Prosecutor's Office, told media sources that the prosecutor did not have an immediate response to the Gaymon family statement. "The investigation is continuing," said Carter. "Our next move would be to present the case to the grand jury." Under New Jersey law, whenever a police officer is involved in a shooting a grand jury must hear the case. It is up to the grand jury to decide whether the shooting was justified, said Carter, who anticipates that the proceedings will take weeks. Carter said that the police officer who shot Gaymon had been with the Essex County Sheriff's Office for eight years.

"It's a very large park, there are ball fields and cherry blossoms but there is a secluded area where there have been complaints about public sex, which is why there was an undercover operation to deter that activity," said Carter.

Carter said that there was no specific complaint made regarding Gaymon and that the police officer had been assigned to the area to deal with the "ongoing problem."

The Atlanta Credit Union, where Gaymon had served as the president and CEO for nearly four years, released a statement on the death saying that the staff and customers were "deeply saddened" by the loss.

Jewish Drug Dealers!


December 10, 2010

New York (WCJB) -- Police broke up a suspected drug ring after a months-long investigation, called Operation Ivy League, that resulted in the arrest of five Columbia University students and three off-campus suppliers, officials said Wednesday.

The students, who were arrested Tuesday, were identified as Harrison David, Chris Coles, Adam Klein, Jose Stephan Perez and Michael Wymbs, according to the Special Narcotics Prosecutor's Office in New York. They were charged with the criminal sale of a controlled substance after undercover officers made some $11,000 in illegal drug purchases during the five-month undercover investigation, the prosecutor's office said in a written statement.

David, who was salutatorian of his high school class, was the initial target of a police investigation that began in July after authorities received anonymous tips regarding voluminous drug sales on university grounds, prosecutor Bridget G. Brennan said Wednesday. It was David's alleged dealings that helped officers locate additional sellers and suppliers, she said.

"They weren't just selling small amounts," Brennan added. "When the undercover officer asked for large amounts of cocaine and marijuana, they seemed fully capable of delivering." Authorities say the students sold a cocktail of illegal substances, including Adderall, marijuana, Ecstasy, cocaine and LSD-laced Altoid mints. "This drug bust is just the tip of the iceberg," said graduate student Kirk Klocke. "In a community where there are so many students who have a disposable income, it is a given that there will be drug activity."

Three off-campus drug suppliers also were arrested on related charges Sunday. They were identified as Roberto Lagares, Miron Sarzynski and his girlfriend, Megan Asper, authorities said. Police charged Sarzynski, 23, with attempting to kidnap after he allegedly hired an undercover officer to abduct a rival drug dealer in an effort to collect money he was owed, according to the statement. Sarzynski told the undercover officer to torture the rival dealer by forcibly administering heavy doses of LSD, and to kill the person if he could not obtain the money, it said.

"The fact that a supplier to the Columbia students was willing to kill his rivals should demolish any argument that drugs on campus is a victimless crime," Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said in the statement. "This is no way to work your way through college." Authorities say the majority of the sales took place in common areas and bedrooms of three university fraternities, identified as Alpha Epsilon Pi, Pi Kappa Alpha and Psi Upsilon.

"The students arrested supplied dangerous substances to their friends and other students to turn a quick profit, but subjected themselves to risks, of which they were either ignorant or in denial," Brennan told CNN affiliate WABC.

Columbia University's dean of student affairs, Kevin Shollenberger, said the Ivy League school is "taking this matter very seriously."

"The alleged behavior of the students involved in this incident goes against not only state and federal law, but also university policy and the principles we have set -- and strive together to maintain -- for our community," Shollenberger said in a written statement.

The suspects all pleaded not guilty during a court arraignment Tuesday. They are to appear in court on January 18, 2011.

"We are contesting the charges," said defense attorney Herschel Katz, who is representing Klein. He declined additional comment, citing the ongoing nature of court proceedings.

The remaining suspects and their legal representatives were not immediately available for comment.

Lindenwold Police


November 23, 2010

Lindenwold, New Jersey - Two men -- one trying to protect his family, the other on the job to protect the community -- clashed one October afternoon, triggering a tragic result. Today, one suffers with a misshapen, grossly swollen head after undergoing a craniotomy; the other is under investigation for alleged police brutality. The incident started with what normally would have been a relatively inconsequential traffic stop.



Michelle Black, an African-American mother with her two young children in the back seat of her sport utility vehicle, was about to pull out from the driveway of her apartment complex. A white Lindenwold, New Jersey, police officer, Scott Pierson, pulled her over. Behind Black was her husband, James, a taxi driver, who drove up next to her to find out what was the matter. "The officer was like, 'Move the car! Move the car!' " recalled Michelle Black. "So my husband was like, 'That's my family, officer. I was just trying to tell you that's my wife and my kids.' "

Lindenwold police say Pierson repeatedly instructed James Black to move on, but when he failed to do so, the officer placed him under arrest. "When Officer Pierson attempted to handcuff him, Mr. Black refused to be handcuffed," said Detective Christopher Sherrer, spokesman for the Lindenwold Police Department.

On advice of his attorney, James Black will not discuss details of the incident because he is facing criminal charges. His wife said he simply told the officer not to handcuff him in front of his family. But the story from the police differs.

"Mr. Black refused to allow the officer to put him under arrest by struggling, pulling away and wrestling with the officer," Sherrer said. Officers are trained to control an arrest situation, Lindenwold Police Chief Stan Lemayski said. "The officer must maintain control for the safety of the officer, the surrounding public and also the person arrested," Lemayski said. Pierson is a police veteran with 22 years of law enforcement experience, 11 with the Lindenwold police, according to the department. His partner is a 2½-year-old K-9 German shepherd named Kovu.

During the struggle, Pierson remotely opened the canine compartment of his vehicle, Sherrer said. "The dog sensed a threat to Officer Pierson and latched onto Mr. Black's leg." Black, his arms and legs still scarred with bite and claw wounds, said the K-9 attack was vicious. "His teeth were sharp. You know, it ripped my flesh like paper. Yeah, stinging." Then, according to Michelle Black and an independent witness who refused to be identified, the officer placed Black in a chokehold. "As soon as the dog started biting my husband, the officer lifted his arm around my husband's neck [and] started choking him, in like, the headlock position," she said. "The kids are screaming, 'Why are they killing Daddy?'" Asked whether Pierson had used a chokehold on James Black, Sherrer said, "I have no idea. It's not a technique that would have been taught." Sherrer declined to share the police report, citing an ongoing internal investigation.

Trauma from the incident, Michelle Black claims, caused her husband to suffer a stroke and be rushed into emergency surgery hours after he had been treated for his bite wounds. Michelle Black said she believes the arrest was racially motivated. Within an hour of the incident, she filed a complaint against Pierson for use of excessive force. Lindenwold police intend to complete its investigation this month and forward it to the Camden County prosecutor for review and possible action. Weeks after the scuffle, James Black has a huge swelling on the right side of his head. "Whichever way I lean my head, [it] feels like my brain, I can feel it all float to that side," Black said.

Police charged Black with aggravated assault on a police officer and resisting arrest, third-degree offenses for which he could face three to five years in prison, as well as two disorderly conduct charges, obstruction and interference with a police officer using a K-9. This is not the first time James Black has had trouble with the law. In 1997, he was convicted of unlawful possession of a weapon and was imprisoned in New Jersey for 12 months in 2001 and 2002. Eight days after the incident, Michelle Black was cited for careless driving.


Newark, New Jersey




Major Corruption!


July 23, 2009

FBI agents swept across northern New Jersey on Thursday morning, making arrests in what one of the largest and most high-profile corruption probes in state history. Federal prosecutors say about 44 people have been arrested. Mayors of three major New Jersey cities and an assemblyman are among [the] 44 people arrested as part [a major] corruption and international money laundering conspiracy [investigation]. [They include:] Hoboken Mayor Peter Cammarano III; Secaucus Mayor Dennis Elwell; Ridgefield Mayor Anthony Suarez; Ocean Co[unty] Assemblyman Daniel Van Pelt; New Jersey City Deputy Mayor Leona Baldini; and New Jersey City Council President Mario Vega.

Cammarano, 32, who won a runoff election last month, is charged with accepting $25,000 in cash bribes from an undercover cooperating witness. In secretly recorded conversations outlined in the complaint against Cammarano, the candidate made it clear to prospective campaign donors that he was a friend of developers.











When a cooperating witness posing as a developer who was donating $5,000 to the campaign told Cammarano just days before the mayoral election that he wanted to make sure he had his support with "some properties we're working on," Cammarano is quoted as saying, "I'll be there."

Elwell is charged with taking $10,000.

Ridgefield Mayor Anthony Suarez, who is also an attorney, is charged with agreeing to accept an illegal $10,000 cash payment for his legal defense fund. Van Pelt is accused of accepting $10,000 from a government witness posing as a developer seeking permit help.

Smith, the Jersey City Council President, and several other current and former Jersey City public officials also are accused of accepting money to help the fake developer gain permits and approvals.

Baldini, 74, is charged with conspiracy to commit extortion by taking $20,000 in illegal campaign contributions.

The Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (commonly referred to as RICO Act or RICO) is a United States federal law that provides for extended criminal penalties and a civil cause of action for acts performed as part of an ongoing criminal organization. RICO was enacted by section 901(a) of the Organized Crime Control Act of 1970 (Pub.L. 91-452, 84 Stat. 922, enacted October 15, 1970). RICO is codified as Chapter 96 of Title 18 of the United States Code, 18 U.S.C. § 1961–1968. While its intended use was to prosecute the Mafia as well as others who were actively engaged in organized crime, its application has been more widespread.



Busloads carrying those arrested were brought to the FBI's Newark field office Thursday morning, July 23, 2009. One agent slowly walked an elderly rabbi into the building as another covered his face with a felt hat. Several rabbis in New York and New Jersey were arrest[ed][as] part of the money-laundering [criminal] investigation. They were charged with offenses ranging from the trafficking of kidneys from Israeli donors to laundering proceeds from selling fake Gucci and Prada bags.

According to the U.S. Attorney's Office, the investigation initially focused, with the help of the cooperating witness, on the money laundering network that operated between Brooklyn, Deal, N.J. and Israel. The network is alleged to have laundered tens of millions of dollars through charities controlled by rabbis in New York (Bernie Madoff's territory) and New Jersey.

[The Rabbis] include[:]

Eliahu Ben Haim, 58, of Long Branch, NJ, charged with money laundering.
Schmulik Cohen, 35, of Brooklyn, NY, charged with money laundering and illegal money transmitting.
Levi Deutsch, 37, of Brooklyn, NY, charged with money laundering.
Yeshayahu Ehrental, 65, of Brooklyn, NY, charged with money laundering and illegal money transmitting.
Mordchai Fish, 56, of Brooklyn, NY, charged with money laundering.
Yolie Gertner, 30, of Brooklyn, NY, charged with money laundering.
David S. Goldhirsh, 30, of Brooklyn, NY, charged with money laundering.
Saul Kassin, 87, of Brooklyn, NY, charged with money laundering.
Edmund Nahum, 56, of Deal, NJ, charged with money laundering.
Abe Pollack, 40, of Brooklyn, NY, charged with money laundering.
Lavel Schwartz, 57, of Brooklyn, NY, charged with money laundering.
Binyomin Spira, 28, of Brooklyn, NY, charged with money laundering.
Naftoly Weber, 40, of Brooklyn, NY, charged with money laundering.
Arye Weiss, 34, of Brooklyn, NY, charged with money laundering and illegal money transmitting.

The arrests are the result of a two-year FBI and IRS probe that began with an investigation of money transfers by members of the Syrian enclaves in Deal, New Jersey and Brooklyn, including rabbis and religious leaders of the wealthy communities. Agents raided religious institutions in Brooklyn and New Jersey to collect information. Mike Winnick was praying inside the Deal Synagogue when it was raided. Winnick says FBI agents removed several boxes from the Deal Yeshiva. The school was founded by Rabbi Isaac Dwek and his wife. Dwek's son, Solomon, resigned from its board of trustees following his arrest in 2007 on bank fraud charges relating to a bounced $25 million check.

Under RICO, a person who is a member of an enterprise that has committed any two of 35 crimes—27 federal crimes and 8 state crimes—within a 10-year period can be charged with racketeering. Those found guilty of racketeering can be fined up to $25,000 and/or sentenced to 20 years in prison per racketeering count. In addition, the racketeer must forfeit all ill-gotten gains and interest in any business gained through a pattern of "racketeering activity." RICO also permits a private individual harmed by the actions of such an enterprise to file a civil suit; if successful, the individual can collect treble damages.


See:

Alameda County Corrupt Judges & District Attorneys (Calif.)
Madoff Pleads Guilty! Ordered Jailed!!!
Bernard Madoff, Corrupt Jew
Judges of The Regents of the University of California

One criminal complaint charges Levy-Izhak Rosenbaum, 58, of Brooklyn, NY, with conspiring to broker the sale of a human kidney for a transplant, at a cost of $160,000 to the transplant recipient. According to the complaint, Rosenbaum said he had been brokering the sale of kidneys for 10 years.

Rosenbaum faces the maximum statutory penalties of 20 years in federal prison and a maximum statutory fine of $250,000 for the charge of conspiring to commit money laundering. He also faces the maximum statutory penalties of 5 years in federal prison and a maximum statutory fine of $250,000 for the charge of conspiring to conduct an illegal money transmitting business. In addition, he faces the maximum statutory penalties of 5 years in federal prison and a maximum statutory fine of $250,000 for the charge of conspiring to transport human organs.


See:

The Regents of the University of California


The Politicians


Those arrested face the maximum statutory penalties of 20 years in federal prison and a maximum statutory fine of $250,000 for the charge of conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right and/or attempted extortion under color of official right; and the maximum statutory penalties of 10 years in Federal prison and a maximum statutory fine of $250,000 for the charge of agreeing to offer a bribe payment to a public official. Those arrested include:

Moshe Altman, 39, of Monsey, NY, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right & money laundering;
Charlie Ammon, 33, of Lakewood, NJ, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right;
Leona Beldini, 74, of Jersey City, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right;
Peter Cammarano III, 32, of Hoboken, NJ, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right;
Joseph Cardwell, 68, of Jersey City, NJ, charged with agreeing to offer bribe to public official;
Joseph Castagna, 53, of Jersey City, NJ, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right;
Guy Catrillo, 54, of Jersey City, NJ, charged with attempted extortion under color of official right;
Edward Cheatam, 61, of Jersey City, NJ, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right & attempted extortion;
Dennis Elwell, 64, of Secaucus, NJ, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right;
Itzak Friedlander, 41, of Union City, NJ, charged with money laundering conspiracy;
Richard Greene, 45, of Jersey City, NJ, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right;
John Guarini, 59, of Bayonne, NJ, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right;
Shimon Haber, 34, of Brooklyn, NY, charged with money laundering conspiracy;
Denis Jaslow, 46, of Wall, NJ, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right;
Maher A. Khalil, 39, of Jersey City, NJ, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right & attempted extortion;
James P. "Jimmy" King, 67, of Jersey City, NJ, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right;
Louis Manzo, 54, of Jersey City, NJ, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right;
Michael Manzo, 53, of Jersey City, NJ, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right;
Ronald Manzo, 65, of Bayonne, NJ, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right;
Michael Schaffer, 58, of Hoboken, NJ, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right;
Lori Serrano, 37, of Jersey City, NJ, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right;
Jack Shaw, 61, of Jersey City, NJ, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right;
L. Harvey Smith, 60, of Jersey City, NJ, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right;
Anthony R. Suarez, 42, of Ridgefield, NJ, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right;
Vincent Tabbachino, 68, of Fairview, NJ, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right & money laundering;
Daniel M. Van Pelt, 44, of Waretown, NJ, charged with attempted extortion under color of official right;
Mariano Vega, 59, of Jersey City, NJ, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right;
Lavern Webb-Washington, 60, of Jersey City, charged with conspiracy to commit extortion under color of official right; and
Jeffrey Williamson, 57, of Lakewood, NJ, charged with attempted extortion under color of official right.

Under the law, racketeering activity means:

Any violation of state statutes against gambling, murder, kidnapping, extortion, arson, robbery, bribery, dealing in obscene matter, or dealing in a controlled substance or listed chemical (as defined in the Controlled Substances Act);

Any act of bribery, counterfeiting, theft, embezzlement, fraud, dealing in obscene matter, obstruction of justice, slavery, racketeering, gambling, money laundering, commission of murder-for-hire, and several other offenses covered under the Federal criminal code (Title 18);

Embezzlement of union funds;
Bankruptcy or securities fraud;
Drug trafficking;
Money laundering and related offenses;
Bringing in, aiding or assisting aliens in illegally entering the country (if the action was for financial gain); or
Acts of terrorism.

Pattern of racketeering activity requires at least two acts of racketeering activity, one of which occurred after the effective date of this chapter and the last of which occurred within ten years (excluding any period of imprisonment) after the commission of a prior act of racketeering activity. The U.S. Supreme Court has instructed federal courts to follow the continuity-plus-relationship test in order to determine whether the facts of a specific case give rise to an established pattern. Predicate acts are related if they "have the same or similar purposes, results, participants, victims, or methods of commission, or otherwise are interrelated by distinguishing characteristics and are not isolated events." (H.J. Inc. v. Northwestern Bell Telephone Co.) Continuity is both a closed and open ended concept, referring to either a closed period of conduct, or to past conduct that by its nature projects into the future with a threat of repetition.

Corruption has permeated New Jersey politics for years. Former U.S. Attorney Chris Christie, who is currently running on the Republican ticket for governor, takes credit for 130 convictions of elected and appointed officials on corruption charges.


Cops & Domestic Violence


Wife Killing Cops! - Part I
Wife Killing Cops! - Part II
Deputy Paul R. Kovacich, Wife Killer


Murderous Police Officers


B.A.R.T.+L.A.P.D.=187(P.C.)(LAPD Detective arrested for cold case homicide; and B.A.R.T. Transit Killer-Cop!)
Cops or Killers?
Five - "O" Homicide(White Cop kills black cop after "mistaking" black cop for criminal!)
NYPD - A History of Homicidal Cops(A history of NYPD Officers committing murder!)
Arthur Tessler, Jason R. Smith & Gregg Junnier(Alanta Police Officers lie to obtain search warrant; murder 90-year old woman; and then plant drugs to cover-up murder)
PA State Trooper Kevin Foley, Murderous(Convicted March 18, 2009 of First-Degree Murder. Killed girlfriend's ex-hubby (Dentist)!!)
PA State Trooper Samuel J. Hassan, Murderous(March 15, 2009 Murder of Unarmed motorist. Previously shot and killed 12 year old African-American boy!!)
Homer Police Department(February 20, 2009 Murder of Unarmed Black Man, 73 year old black man by two white police officers in Homer, Louisiana!!)
Taser Deaths by the Police!
New Orleans Police Department(January 1, 2009 Murder of Unarmed Black Man, shot nine (9) times in the back!!)


Oakland, California Police Department


Officer Pat Gonzales: Racist, Murderous Oakland Police Officer - 3 Killings
Officer Hector Jimenez: Racist, Murderous Oakland Police Officer - 2 Killings
Captain Edward Poulson, OPD(Beating Death of Suspect (2000) Promoted in 2008)
Investigator interfered in police probes of former bakery CEO
Oakland Police Department, Corrupt, I
Oakland, California Police Department, Corruption, II
Oakland Police Department, III
Oakland Police Department, IV
Oakland Police Department, V - Major Corruption


Jeff Loman, Deputy Chief, OPD(Updated: Re-instated as a (demoted) Lieutenant)
Deborah Edgerly, Corrupt former Oakland City Administrator


Oakland, CA Transit Cop Shooting


Mehserle Makes Bail!!!(Updated May 18, 2009) January 1, 2009 Murder of Unarmed Black Man, shot once (1) in the back!!)
Tony Pirone, B.P.D.(Mehserle Accomplice - Jan. 1, 2009 Homicide)
Johannes Mehserle, Killer Cop(Oakland's New Year's (2009) Transit Killer Cop)
The B.A.R.T. Shooting Investigation(The Investigation of Oakland's New Year's (2009) Transit Killer Cop)
The B.A.R.T. Aftermath (The Oakland Riots New (2009))
B.A.R.T. Police, Racism, Homicide(Video of The Oakland New Year's Day (2009) Transit Shooting )


Cops that Sexually Offend


Cops that Sexually Offend! (Part I)
Cops that Sexually Offend! (Part II)
Sexually Offensive Cops! (Part III)
Cops that Sexually Offend! (Part IV)
Cops that Sexually Offend! (Part V)
Cops that Sexually Offend! (Part VI)
Cops that Sexually Offend! (Part VII)
Cops that Sexually Offend! (Part VIII)
Cops that Sexually Offend! (Part IX)
Cops that Sexually Offend! (Part X)
Cops that Sexually Offend! (Part XI)
Cops that Sexually Offend! (Part XII)
Cops that Sexually Offend! (Part XIII)
Cops that Sexually Offend! (Part XIV)
Cops that Sexually Offend! (Part XV)


Sexually Offensive Judges


Judge Jack Gifford, Retired, Solicitation
Judge Ronald C. Kline, Child Pornography
Chief U.S. District Judge Edward Nottingham, Solicitation


Judges of Interest


James J. Marchiano, Corrupt Judge
Stuart Hing, Corrupt Judge (Recent Appointment)
Douglas E. Swager, Corrupt Judge
Martin Jenkins, Corrupt Judge ("Uncle Tom")
David Bernard Flinn, Corrupt Judge
John T. Noonan, Corrupt Judge of the 9th Circuit
Former Judge Ralph B. Robertson, Racist
Judge Kenneth R. Kingsbury, Ret., Racist, Corrupt
Corrupt Judges, Frame-ups & Graft
Judges of the Regents of the University of California


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