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Kobane, Syria., Int., -- A new ISIS video purports to show weapons airdropped by U.S. forces intended for Kurdish fighters in the hands of the very militants the munitions were meant to destroy. The U.S. on Sunday said it had dropped weapons, ammunition and medical supplies for the first time to Kurdish fighters defending the Syrian town of Kobani from ISIS. A day later, U.S. officials said one of the six airstrikes it carried out near Kobani intentionally struck a bundle of supplies to keep it from falling into the wrong hands. More News @Corrupt Justice™ from More videos @The Attorney Depot™ and Follow us @Twitter Check our Editor's Reading List on Scribd.

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Monday, October 27, 2008

Deborah Edgerly, Corrupt former Oakland City Administrator



«• August 1, 2009 •»

Indianapolis, IN - A suspended Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department officer who already faced charges of selling a handgun to a felon was arrested Thursday on accusations that he beat a Hancock County man in April 2009. Jason Barber, 32, was held in the Hancock County Jail in Greenfield on felony battery charges, Sheriff's Department Maj. Joe Hunt said.

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NOW PLAYING!


"Dilemmas of Democracy
Race & Police Brutality in the USA - 2012!"


Preview




Runtime: 01:34:31 (One Hour, Thirty-Four Min. & Thirty-One Secs.)
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Description: In the United States, race and police brutality continue to be closely linked, and the phenomenon has sparked a string of race riots and general uprisings over the years. During the Vietnam War, anti-war demonstrations were sometimes quelled through the use of billy-clubs and CS gas, commonly known as tear gas. The most notorious of these assaults took place during the August 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. The actions of the police were later described as a "police riot" in the Walker Report to the U.S. National Commission on the Causes and Prevention of Violence (See Documentary). One recent and notable uprising was caused by the arrest and beating of Rodney King on March 3, 1991 by officers of the Los Angeles Police Department. The police officers' brutality had been videotaped by a bystander and widely broadcast (around the world) afterwards. When the four law enforcement officers charged with assault and other charges were acquitted, the 1992 Los Angeles Riots broke out (See Documentary). Copyright © 2013 Streat Beatz™. All Rights Reserved.
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“Another Nigger fried. No big deal.”

-- April 16, 2011, Statement by New York City Police Officer Michael Daragjati, boasting of his false arrest of another African-American male.

Top News Stories!

Not My Problem ...!

Posted: 01/15/2013 05:11:29 PM PST - Updated: 01/15/2013 08:00:30 PM PST

Oakland, CA -- A proposal to put more police on Oakland streets and free up officers to focus on crime fighting won a ringing endorsement Tuesday, while Gov. Brown made it clear that the city should not expect an influx of state aid to solve its crime woes.

"Certainly I want to help where we can, but Oakland has to solve its own problems," Brown told reporters, according to the Sacramento Bee. "The clergy, the Police Department, the Fire Department, the mayor, you've got to pull together in extraordinary ways to respond. And as a citizen of Oakland, I wish you well and I'll do my part."

Late last year, Brown directed the California Highway Patrol to help Oakland's undermanned police department deal with an ongoing crime wave. After four people were gunned down in Oakland Friday, city leaders considered calling a state of emergency, but opted against it after determining that it wouldn't trigger additional aid.

On Tuesday, the council's Finance Committee approved proposals to contract with the Alameda County Sheriff's Office to help patrol streets, provide funding for the city's third police academy within the past year and hire 21 civilian employees for the police department.

Most of the civilian hires would do lower level police work, freeing up officers to focus on crime fighting.

The proposals will go before the full council next week.

Later Tuesday, the council's Public Safety is expected to advance a proposal to hire former LAPD Chief Bill Bratton to implement a crime-reduction plan. Protests are planned by opponents who fear Bratton will advocate giving Oakland police more latitude to stop and search potential suspects.

Head Doctor!

Posted: 12/13/2012 02:35:27 PM PST - Updated: 12/13/2012 08:24:20 PM PST

SAN MATEO, CA -- Surveillance video of a woman running in high heels and performing oral sex in a public park landed her behind bars Thursday after a judge sentenced her to nine months in jail for performing the physical acts while claiming to be too injured to work, the district attorney said.

Modupe Adunni Martin, 29 (pictured left) of Hayward, was taken to jail upon being sentenced Thursday in San Mateo County Superior Court, according to San Mateo County District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe. A former custodian for the Sequoia Union High School District, Martin told her employers at Woodside High School that she was unable to walk after injuring her ankle on the job in 2009.

Martin, who walked with crutches into 10 separate doctor's visits over the course of three months, stirred suspicion in the two doctors who tended to her and they suspected she was exaggerating the extent of her injuries, Wagstaffe said. Doctors gained permission to take surveillance of Martin surrounding one of her medical visits, to ensure she was not lying to obtain workers' compensation benefits.

Doctors later viewed the video footage, which shows Martin walking with crutches into the doctor's office, and then ditching them shortly thereafter, Wagstaffe said. After the visit, Martin walked to a public park without the crutches and ran a short distance in her high-heeled shoes, before kneeling and performing oral sex on her boyfriend.

Doctors determined that Martin's ability to perform the acts demonstrated in the video were not consistent with the injuries she said she was suffering from, and concluded she was lying about her injuries to obtain benefits, Wagstaffe said.

Martin was charged with the 10 counts of workers' compensation fraud in August of 2009. In addition to her jail sentence, Martin was sentenced to three months probation and ordered to repay more than $79,000 in defrauded funds.

No Boundaries!


First Posted: Feb 14, 2012 - Updated: 2:02 PM, PST, Feb. 24, 2012

Orange, CA -- Sheriff's Deputy Jennifer McClain, 29, a black woman, was arrested for having sex with an Inmate. The inmate, Christopher R. Brown, 30 is a member of a white supremacist gang (that hates and kills blacks). McClain was assigned to work in the Men’s Central Jail in Santa Ana. McClain, a five-year veteran deputy with the Orange County Sheriff's Department, is accused of having sex with the male inmate at the Men's Central Jail where she worked. She has not been explained how this unlikely partnership, was forged. McClain (pictured right) was booked in the Santa Ana city jail and released from custody on her own recognizance. No formal charges have been filed but prosecutors are “still investigating” the matter and will announce any filing decisions on a future date.

McClain was arrested Thursday night after the inmate told authorities he had consensual sex with the officer. Authorities said the alleged crime took place between November and December of last year in the intake release center while McClain, who is a single mother of a young child, was on duty. Investigators are alleging that McClain and inmate Brown (pictured below, center) had “sex more than once” during November and December.



McClain, who was arrested while on duty, was released from custody on her own recognizance. She is currently on paid leave from the department.

$40 - G's!


Posted: 04/25/2011 10:05:03 AM PDT
Updated: 04/29/2011 01:40:30 PM PDT


OAKLAND, CA -- Oakland Police revised the description of a getaway car used by four men who were involved in the shooting of six people at a Jack London Square restaurant and nightclub early Monday morning. The gunfire claimed the lives of William Jenkins, 27, of Oakland and Adam Williams, 22, of San Leandro.



Police now believe that the men fled from Sweet Jimmie’s nightclub at 311 Broadway Street in a newer model, four-door White Toyota Camry after firing an assault rifle at a crowd of patrons who had assembled at the popular after hours eatery. The 12:45 a.m. shooting followed a botched robbery attempt, investigators believe, when the suspects attempted to rob two other men who ran into the nightclub seeking assistance. Two other male victims remained in critical condition, according to Oakland Police spokesperson Cynthia Perkins. Two female shooting victims were treated for non-life threatening injuries and released.

Police initially believed the suspects fled in a White Dodge Avenger but revised the getaway car’s description on Wednesday. The suspects are described as African American males in their late teens or early twenties, police said. Anyone with information on the shooting is asked to call the Oakland Police Department at (510) 238-3821 or e-mail Oaklandhomicide@oaklandnet.com. CrimeStoppers is offering a $40,000 reward for tips leading to the arrests of the suspects.

Mc-D's Beatdown!

Posted: 9/13/2011

Baltimore County, Md. -- Remember the two black thug teenage girls in Baltimore who were captured on video beating a transgendered person at a McDonald’s? Well, 19-year old Teonna Brown was finally sentenced after being convicted of a hate crime and first degree assault. On 9-13-11, she was sentenced to 5 years in prison for a hate crime and felony assault.

Over and over again, two teenage girls attack and beat Chrissy Polis inside a Baltimore County McDonalds until she goes into a seizure — all while a laughing McDonald’s employee records the vicious attack on his cell phone. The Youtube video sparked community outrage and landed 19-year-old Teonna Brown and her 14-year-old accomplice in jail. Brown now sentenced to five years in prison.

Polis, who is transgender, chose not to appear in court for the sentencing. But her hero Vicki Thoms was. “I just wanted to make sure that justice was served,” Thoms said. She can be seen in the video trying to stop the attack on Polis. She ending up punched in the eye herself. “I thought she was going to die,” Thoms said.

In court, Brown tearfully offered remorse saying “I’m sorry. My mother did not raise me like this. I would really like to apologize to the victim, Miss Chrissy Polis.” But that apology not accepted according to a letter Polis wrote to the judge. “I felt like I was going to die that day,” the letter reads. “I continue to suffer seizures, bouts of crying, mental anguish and anxiety. I fear being alone. I have flashbacks about the attacks. I do not forgive them for what they did to me. “

Prosecutors say hate was clearly the motivation for the attack. “I don’t really care who the victim is,” said Scott Shellenberger. “This wasn’t about a political statement. This was about prosecuting people for a heinous crime that they committed.”

“I just wish that there was more love in this world than hate,” Thoms said. “That’s what I keep saying every time you guys talk to me, and that’s what I hope she learns out of this whole thing, and everybody learns the same thing.”

The criminal case is over, but the civil case is just beginning. Polis has filed suit against McDonald’s for failing to stop the beating and because it was its employee who video taped the incident while laughing about it. So far a settlement has not been reached.

The other suspect in the case already made an admission to the beating and remains locked up in juvenile detention.

Posted: 04/22/2011 05:07:56 PM PDT

BALTIMORE, MD (WCJB) -- Baltimore County police say two teens are facing charges following a videotaped beating at a fast-food restaurant. Police said Friday that a 14-year-old girl has been charged as a juvenile and charges are pending against an 18-year-old female. Police say officers who responded to the McDonald's restaurant on Monday found a 22-year-old woman who appeared to be having a seizure. Police say witnesses told the officers the woman had been assaulted by two female suspects. The videotape of the beating posted below shows a woman being attacked repeatedly while an employee tries to separate them. The video prompted the company to issue a statement Friday condemning the incident.


WARNING: The video below is graphic and disturbing, and contains racist foul language.

And Another One!

Janaury 9, 2011

We all know that three Broward Sheriff's Office deputies were arrested earlier this month and charged with supplying contraband to inmates and having sex with them. The shocking part, though, is the identity of the prisoner whom one of the female jail guards was romancing and supplying with contraband. Kiara Monet Walker, a 21-year-old deputy, was consorting with Dietrick Johnson, according to court records. Johnson is one of the notorious pharmacy store bandits who remains a chief suspect in the murder of BSO Sgt. Chris Reyka (pictured above, left).



How could a sworn deputy become intimate with a prisoner who is suspected in the cold-blooded murder of a fellow deputy in her own agency? That's a question the continuing investigation is trying to answer. Deitrick Johnson (pictured above, center) who is known by the street moniker: "Real Deal" and who has been implicated in 13 pharmacy store robberies, was sitting in jail after his Christmas Eve 2007 robbery arrest when he struck up a romance with Broward County Sheriff Deputy Kiara Walker. (pictured above, inset - upper right)
"Detectives searched Johnson's jail cell and retrieved the phone and a makeshift lighter, consisting of batteries and wires. A piece of paper with Walker's personal number was inside Johnson's bible. Cell phone records showed Walker and Johnson spoke and sent text messages "several hundred times" during a three-week period. Some text messages were explicit and discussed the pair having sex in Johnson's cell. The pair also wrote that they loved each other. "Kiara walker im [sic] heavy in love with you," Johnson wrote in one text. Cell phone pictures that showed a woman's underwear and private parts also were found. Her face wasn't shown."

Dep. Walker is accused of exchanging sexually explicit texts and photographs with Johnson, some of which referred to having sex in his jail cell. She is also alleged to have supplied him with a cell phone. Sources inside BSO tell me that more arrests are expected in the case and that there may have been a plan in the works to smuggle in a gun to an inmate, possibly Deitrick Johnson.

Sgt. Reyka, by all accounts an exemplary officer, was shot to death behind a Walgreens store in Pompano Beach at 1:30 a.m. August 10, 2007 -- at the height of Johnson's robbery spree. Sheriff Al Lamberti has publicly stated that he believes Reyka's murder is connected to those robberies, but so far there hasn't been enough evidence to make a case.

Veteran private investigator Dan Riemer, who delved into the case, filed court papers last year claiming to have solved the Reyka murder. Although Riemer wouldn't name names publicly, sources say his investigation determined that the pharmacy store robbers were behind the murder, including Johnson, Gerald Joshua, and gang leader Tim Johnson, who is no relation to Deitrick. As the triggerman, Riemer named Joshua as the triggerman, sources said.

The case has been held up by a lack of evidence, including the murder weapon. Two of Tim Johnson's siblings, Allen Johnson and Consuela Jones, disposed of four guns -- one of which was believed to have been used in the Reyka slaying -- that were linked to the drugstore robberies. BSO recovered some of those guns, but they didn't match the murder weapon. At least one of the gang's guns is still missing.

Deputies charged Consuela Jones with tampering with evidence. Her attorney hired Riemer to investigate the case. One of the few clues in the case made public by BSO is a photograph of the white four-door sedan -- possibly a Crown Victoria or Mercury Grand Marquis -- believed to have been driven from the scene by the killers. Riemer learned that a local used-car-lot owner had loaned a white sedan to Joshua and Johnson shortly before the night Reyka was killed. The car hasn't been located. Riemer learned that the robbers were preparing to hit the Walgreens store in Pompano when Reyka came upon the car. When the 51-year-old sergeant and father of four noticed the car move, he turned on his blue lights and approached the sedan. That's when the killer gunned him down. Johnson and his former cohorts remain top suspects in the Reyka murder.

Oakland City Administrator Deborah Edgerly!


Posted: 12/13/2012 12:41:51 PM PST - Updated: 12/13/2012 03:06:50 PM PST



OAKLAND, CA -- The chances of winning a financial windfall from the city of Oakland for an alleged wrongful termination are quickly dwindling for former city administrator Deborah Edgerly. About a year after an Alameda County jury rejected Edgerly's claims that she was fired because of gender discrimination, a state appeals court ruled this week that she cannot pursue a claim based on the state's whistle-blower law. Edgerly sued the city in 2009 after she was fired on July, 1, 2008, by former Mayor Ron Dellums, claiming she lost her job because she was a woman and because she refused to approve city reimbursement for three questionable expenses sought by Dellums.

Dellums had asked for the city to pay his wife's cellphone bill, utility bills at his private home and overtime for his personal driver.

Edgerly's firing, however, came in the midst of allegations that she interfered with a police investigation of her nephew William Lovan, who police suspected was a member of the West Oakland Acorn gang. During a trial in 2009, Dellums testified that he did not fire Edgerly because of the investigation but did so because she stopped communicating with him after she withdrew from a previous agreement to retire.

While a trial court judge allowed Edgerly's claim of gender discrimination to proceed to a jury trial, the judge denied her request to have the jury decide if she was fired because she refused to approve city reimbursement for the questionable expenses. Edgerly claimed she should be protected under the state's whistle-blower law because, by rejecting the expenses, she was essentially refusing to allow Dellums to violate the city charter.

But in it's ruling published Wednesday, the state's court of appeal ruled that her actions were not covered by the whistle-blower law because Dellums was not attempting to violate a state law or rule. Instead, the court ruled, Edgerly's claim that she refused to have the city reimburse Dellums was simply part of her routine work and not a protected action under the state law. "Edgerly's argument is that as she routinely acted on each city official's expense reimbursement requests, each rejection constituted a per se violation of (the whistle-blower law), no matter how trivial or routine each rejection was," the court wrote. "This interpretation strains logic and, if adopted, could have serious impacts on the workings of the City and other charter cities."

In addition, the court found, Edgerly's claim that she refused the payments was wrong because evidence showed she "actually approved two of the three requests and referred the third request to the city attorney's office." Edgerly could appeal the decision to the state Supreme Court. Her attorney did not return calls seeking comment. The City Attorney's office declined to comment.

OAKLAND, CA (WCJB) – An Alameda County jury took only 40 minutes Monday to reject a lawsuit filed by former Oakland City Administrator Deborah Edgerly (pictured above, center) claiming that former Mayor Ron Dellums fired her because she was a woman. Dellums, a former congressman who served as Oakland’s mayor from January 2007 to January 2011, fired Edgerly on July 1, 2008. Edgerly had worked for the city for 22 years and former mayor Jerry Brown, now California’s governor, appointed her city administrator on July 2, 2003.


At the time Dellums fired her, Edgerly was under investigation for allegedly tipping off her nephew, city employee William Lovan, that the Oakland Police Department was investigating the Acorn gang. Police said the gang was the worst in the city and claimed that Lovan was a member. Lovan pleaded no contest in 2009 to a felony charge of carrying a concealed and unregistered firearm in a car as a result of the police probe into the Acorn gang but no charges were ever filed against Edgerly.

Da' Same Ole' Guv, ... Again!

November 3, 2010
"[T]he only good n[igger] is a dead n[igger] and they should hang you in the town square to prevent any other n[igger] from coming in the area." -- July 2011 Statement by Oakland Public Schools Police Chief Pete Sarna, referring to an African-American police officer. (August 18, 2007: A high-ranking California Department of Justice official hired by Atty. Gen. Jerry Brown resigned Friday. His resignation comes a week after he crashed a state-owned vehicle and was arrested on suspicion of drunk driving. Peter C. Sarna II, deputy director of the Division of Law Enforcement, helped oversee hundreds of state agents, criminologists and other employees who provide investigative, intelligence, forensic and security services for the department. Sarna, 37, is a former Oakland police officer who headed special operations, including gang suppression efforts, when Brown was the city's mayor. One of the few aides Brown brought along when he took office in January, Sarna assumed a leadership role in the attorney general's anti-gang program that recently produced dozens of arrests through joint state-local raids on gang members' homes in Stockton and Atwater in the Central Valley.)

On this day after elections, [l]et us not forget who hired former [Corrupt] Oakland City Administrator Deborah Edgerly: then-Oakland Mayor Jerry Brown. Her 2005-06 salary was $238,155 including a $10,000 bonus from Dao Mayor. Brown was elected governor of California again, but his Oakland hiring decisions call his judgment into question. Brown forced out the highly esteemed Robert Bobb, and replaced him with someone who couldn't even meet Ron Dellums' low standards. Said Brown at the time: "This is going to inject a note of dynamism and creativity into the process."

16 Months!

November 16, 2010

OAKLAND -- The nephew of former City Administrator Deborah Edgerly was sent to prison this week for 16 months for violating his probation stemming from an illegal gun possession conviction last year. William Lovan (pictured left) a parking meter repairman for the city and alleged gang member, admitted Monday to violating his probation and was promptly sent to state prison.

Deputy District Attorney Christie Bowles asked for a probation revocation in August after Lovan tested positive for using cocaine. A week later, police conducted a search at Lovan's home in Antioch and found $1,000 in cash, four ounces of cocaine with a street value of $12,000, marijuana, ammunition and items affiliated with an Oakland gang. Lovan was on probation after he pleaded no contest last year to possession of assault weapons. The 29-year-old was arrested as part of an Oakland Police Department undercover raid on a street gang that also resulted in the conviction for attempted murder of the gang's alleged leader.

Lovan's arrest eventually led to the dismissal of Edgerly, who was suspected of telling Lovan that the police were conducting a covert investigation into the gang. Lovan was suspected of telling gang members about the investigation. Edgerly denied the allegations and never was charged. Nevertheless, Lovan pleaded no contest to the gun charge and was sentenced to five years of probation and one year of house arrest. Eight months after being sentenced, police received a tip that Lovan once again was involved with the gang and selling drugs. A search of his home in September found the ammunition, cash and drugs. Lovan also faces felony charges in Contra Costa County related to the search in September 2010.

Busted Again!

September 10, 2010 Oakland, CA - William Lovan, a city worker and nephew of former Oakland City Administrator Deborah Edgerly, has been arrested on suspicion of possessing drugs for sale and violating his probation, police said. Acting on information (someone snitched in retaliation for his snitching on "Mac") members of the Oakland police Gun/Gang Investigation Task Force went to Lovan's Antioch home at 3:20 p.m. Wednesday for a probation check. Lovan, 29, who wears an electronic monitoring ankle bracelet, was home at the time. In Lovan's room the officers found $1,000 in cash and four ounces of powdered cocaine with an estimated street value of $12,000. They also found bullets, marijuana and items affiliated with a notorious West Oakland gang, police said. He is in custody but has not yet been formally charged.

Lovan has worked for the city of Oakland as a parking meter repairman since 2003. He was arrested in June 2008 during a massive multiagency police raid on the West Oakland gang that netted 54 arrests and 41 guns.

Lovan was sentenced in January to five years' probation and one year of house arrest in exchange for pleading no contest to a felony weapons charge. A second weapons charge was dropped. Lovan must wear the ankle bracelet for one year. He is allowed to travel to and from his home and job and he cannot have contact with gang members or own any guns. Lovan kept his job despite his felony conviction. City data show his salary is $56,860 for this year.

City staff could not be reached to discuss the situation because offices were closed Thursday. Edgerly was forced out of her job in 2008 partly because of assertions that she had tipped off Lovan about the gang investigation. Lovan was suspected of using the information to tell gang members about the raid. Edgerly denied the accusations and was never charged. She said Thursday that she had not talked to her nephew for some time and was not aware of his arrest.

An attorney who represented Lovan in the earlier case, said he has not yet been retained to represent his former client, but expected that he would. "I've talked to the family but they are still working out the details," he said.

Convicted!

August 6, 2010 OAKLAND -- The suspected leader of a notorious West Oakland street gang was found guilty Thursday of seven felonies, including attempted murder, and now faces at least 40 years in state prison. Marc Anthony Candler, 35, (pictured left) who police and prosecutors say ran the Acorn gang and tried to kill a member of a rival gang, joked with bailiffs before the verdict was read and laughed as a court clerk announced the jury's decision. Candler was arrested in 2008 during one of the largest Oakland Police Department raids against a gang. Candler was one of 54 suspected Acorn gang members arrested as part of a 400 officer and 17 agency raid. The arrests followed a three-monthlong investigation by the police department in which undercover officers and wiretaps were extensively used in an effort to curb the "dangerous and violent" actions conducted at Acorn.


The raid also resulted in police finding more than 41 guns and ultimately led to the resignation of City Administrator Deborah Edgerly, whose nephew William Lovan was also said to have been a member of the gang. Edgerly was fired, in part, after accusations surfaced that she told Lovan about the police raid. Edgerly denied the accusations and was never criminally charged. While most of those arrested during the raid had been charged with minor drug offenses, the case against Candler was the most serious as law enforcement targeted the alleged gang leader. Candler was charged with seven felonies related to a 2006 midday shooting in which, court records state, he shot an assault rifle more than 40 times at Jermel Holloway, a member of a rival gang. Elijah Thomas, 26, also an suspected member of the Acorn gang who prosecutors say was with Candler during the shooting, was also found guilty of attempted murder and other felonies. Holloway escaped the shooting but was killed last year in what is now an unsolved murder. Nevertheless, the three-month investigation of the Acorn gang provided prosecutors with enough evidence to charge Candler with attempted murder and a host of other felonies. Candler was also charged and found guilty of numerous felony enhancements that could result in him spending the rest of his life in prison. "We're pleased with the verdict, the Oakland Police Department did a tremendous job," said deputy district attorney John Brouhard, who tried the case. "This was an extremely dangerous and violent criminal enterprise, and this case was a very violent and bold attack." Candler's defense attorney said that his client never tried to kill Holloway and only went to visit him in an attempt to settle a feud the two had. The attorney said Thursday that he was disappointed with the verdict and frustrated that the jury, which took less than a day and a half to decide the case, had only one Oakland resident and no black members."What familiarity does the jury have with Oakland?" Giller said. "What do people from south county know about Oakland?"

Another one!

July 13, 2010 5:31 PM (Carolyn Riggins, pictured left, aunt of Tampa police shooter suspect, fired from the Tampa Police Department) Tampa police fire Aunt of Dontae Morris after connection with police officer shootings Criminal charges have not been filed against Carolyn Riggins, the civilian Tampa Police Department employee and aunt of Dontae Morris, the man charged with the murders of two Tampa Police officers, but she has been fired. Tampa Police Chief Jane Castor released a statement explaining the department’s decision to fire the ten year employee. “As our department was reeling from the loss of two fine officers, it was another devastating blow to discover a valued Tampa Police Department employee worked against our efforts to catch the hardened criminal.
Not only did Dontae Morris (pictured left) take the lives of two Tampa Police officers, but at least two members of our community and possibly more. Our investigation has revealed that Carolyn Riggins both withheld pertinent information that could have aided in the suspect's apprehension and provided information to his associates that interfered with the department's ability to track down the suspect. Carolyn Riggins' relationship to the suspect and his associates played no role in her termination. Her dismissal is based solely on her actions that hindered the search for Dontae Morris." Carolyn Riggins’ daughter, Alaina Nichole Riggins, was arrested with Dontae Morris’ brother on July 3, 2010. An investigation continues as to who was hiding Dontae Morris during his run from police. According to Chief Castor, Carolyn Riggins never reported to authorities that she lived with the suspect previously and that her daughter and Dontae were close.

Corrupt Official Executed!

July 7, 2010 Beijing, China (WCJB) -- The highest-ranking official accused of collusion with gangs that terrorized the central city of Chongqing has been executed, China's official Xinhua news agency reported. Wen Qiang, 55, former director of the Chongqing Justice Bureau, had been convicted of corruption charges involving organized crime, Xinhua said. He was sentenced to death by a lower court April 14 for accepting bribes, shielding criminal gangs, rape and failing to account for his cash and assets, the news agency said. Wen lost an appeal May 21. He was executed in Chongqing on Wednesday. The Chongqing No. 5 Intermediate People's Court ruled that Wen took bribes totaling more than 12 million yuan (more than $1.7 million U.S.) personally or through his wife from 1996 to 2009. In return, Wen offered posts for officials and helped companies and businesses obtain illegal profits, Xinhua said. Wen also was convicted of shielding five major organized crime gangs in Chongqing after accepting bribes worth 756,500 yuan (more than $110,000 U.S.). In addition, the court ruled that Wen raped a university student after getting her drunk in August 2007, Xinhua said. Wen failed to account for the sources of more than 10 million yuan (nearly $1.48 million U.S.) in personal assets, Xinhua reported, and all of his personal property was seized. Last year's crackdown on organized crime in Chongqing led to the prosecution of 90 local officials; 42 were found guilty of sheltering criminal gangs. Wen is the brother-in-law of the so-called "godmother" of Chongqing's underworld. Xie Caiping was sentenced to 18 months in prison last year. She was accused of operating gambling dens, trafficking in drugs, giving and collecting bribes, and antagonizing citizens, including policemen who tried to investigate her illicit activities. The corruption trials, covered extensively by Chinese media, have transfixed the nation and rallied Chongqing residents, who claim they are fed up with being bullied by their own local officials. "Only capital punishment will serve him right. He deserves to be killed a thousand times," one person commented online about Wen in February. "The Wen Qiang case is only the tip of the iceberg," another wrote. "If China wants more rapid development, there should be a purge to wipe out all the corrupted officials in Communist Party." Analysts said a harsh crackdown on corruption was vital to maintaining public faith in the Communist leadership. "These trials are noteworthy in that the Party leadership wants people to understand that officials who collaborate with organized crime will be dealt with harshly," Russell Leigh Moses, a Beijing-based scholar of Chinese politics, said at the beginning of Wen's trial.

Deborah Edgerly

Update: January 5, 2010 The nephew of former City Administrator Deborah Edgerly (pictured left) was sentenced Tuesday to a year of electronic monitoring and five years probation after pleading no contest to a felony weapon charge. William Lovan, who remains on the city payroll as a parking meter repairman, was arrested in June 2008 as part of the Oakland Police Department's crackdown on the notorious West Oakland Acorn gang. Last October, Lovan agreed to plead no contest to one felony weapon charge in exchange for a second felony weapon charge being dropped. Alameda County Superior Court Judge Morris Jacobson handed down Lovan's (pictured left) sentence in an Oakland courtroom Tuesday morning. Jacobson could have forced Lovan to serve a year in the county jail, but instead agreed to let him serve that year under electronic monitoring and house arrest. Under terms of the sentencing, Lovan cannot own firearms. He can continue to work, but otherwise must remain at home. He is allowed a total daily commute time of two hours to get to his job in Oakland from his home in Antioch. Lovan also faces special gang-related restrictions, such as not affiliating with gang members and not wearing gang colors. Edgerly was fired in 2008 as city administrator after assertions that she favored relatives for jobs in city government and that she tipped off Lovan about the Acorn investigation.Edgerly denied wrongdoing and never faced criminal charges. She filed a wrongful-termination lawsuit in July. City salary data show Lovan's budgeted salary was $56,680 this year. The Alameda County District Attorney's Office said its office believes Lovan tipped off members of the Acorn gang to police wiretaps. Lovan's attorney said Lovan is not a member of any gang, and hopes to continue working for the city. Update: August 7, 2009 On Monday, July 6, 2009, fired Oakland City Administrator Deborah Edgerly has filed suit against her former bosses, claiming she was unfairly terminated after refusing to hand out patronage to Mayor Ron Dellums' supporters and pay some of his wife's bills with city money. As we all know, Mayor Ron Dellums terminated Edgerly in July 2008 after instances of nepotism involving her surfaced, including the allegation that she had tipped her nephew, who also worked for the city, of an impending gang raid by the Oakland Police Department. In the lawsuit, filed in Alameda County Superior Court, Edgerly says the mayor's wife and unpaid adviser, Cynthia Dellums, ordered her to put former Dellums campaign supporters on the city payroll and pay her cell phone bill with city money. In May 2008, the suit alleges, Cynthia Dellums demanded Edgerly come up with city money to pay the couple's $1,600 Pacific Gas and Electric Co. bill. Edgerly further alleges that City Attorney John Russo balked at her request that he pay the city back $4,200 in paycheck advances. Russo said Tuesday, "I don't remember it that way at all. I was the one who offered the repayments when Edgerly said there was no problem." As for the rest of the allegations, Russo said, "We will answer all of them in court." The Mayor Ron Dellum's office declined to comment.
October 27, 2008 On the night of June 7, 2008 Oakland City Administrator Deborah Edgerly - whose duties included overseeing the Oakland Police Department (at an annual salary of $254,000.00) - showed up at a West Oakland liquor store just as her nephew's car was being towed by police as part of an operation against the Acorn gang. The nephew, 27-year-old William Lovan - who works for the city of Oakland as a parking meter repairman - had left the car running and locked the keys inside, along with a gun. Edgerly asked why the car was being towed and the police, in their fashion, said, "Because it's polluting the air." (Edgerly said Lovan was her nephew and threatened police that she would begin internal affairs proceedings against them. Police towed the vehicle anyway and recovered a loaded firearm illegally in Lovan's possession.) Edgerly pulled out her cell phone and dialed up Assistant Oakland Police Chief Howard Jordan's number to complain. Jordan said he'd check it out and call her back. And he did a few minutes later, telling her that the towing job was part of a bigger Oakland police operation. Marc Anthony Chandler, accused Acorn drug boss who allegedly received tipoff on police investigation from Edgerly and her nephew. Operation Nutcracker - June 17, 2008 (The Raids) Oakland police officials said they believe that a raid conducted by 400 officers from 17 different law enforcement agencies at 34 locations simultaneously Tuesday dismantled the worst gang the city had seen in many years. Lt. Ersie Joyner said he believes it will be "very difficult, if not impossible" for the Acorn drug gang to regain its former power in the wake of Tuesday's raids, which included the arrest of the gang's leader, 33-year-old Marc Anthony Chandler of Oakland, who is known as "Mac." He said that 54 people were arrested and 41 firearms were confiscated in what police called "Operation Nutcracker," which began three months ago and culminated in the raids. Joyner said an "ongoing gang violence war" pitting the Acorn group against rival groups Ghost Town and the Lower Bottoms resulted in 37 homicides in West Oakland in the last three years. Joyner said the Acorn group is "the most violent gang we've seen in a long time" so Tuesday's arrests focused on Acorn instead of the other two gangs. He said the other gangs also are engaged in criminal activity, but to a lesser degree. Joyner said four of the suspects arrested Tuesday were involved in recent takeover robberies, including those at Milano Restaurant on Grand Avenue and the Red Boy pizza parlor on Leimert Boulevard. Joyner said those suspects "made an art out of robberies." He said there were many reasons why the Acorn gang was involved in an ongoing battle with the other two gangs, but he said "a dispute over a car and a girl culminated in 37 murders in the West Oakland area." Part 1: Oakland Police - "Operation Nutcracker" Press Conference
Part 2: Oakland Police - "Operation Nutcracker" Press Conference
That might well have been the end of the story - except that according to our sources, police think Edgerly may have made a call to her nephew (William Lovan), warning him to stay away from these "bad people" because the authorities knew what they were up to. "Authorities say the gang was linked to several homicides and a series of restaurant takeover robberies as well as carjackings, drug and weapons trafficking". "According to KTVU, police listened in on a phone call between Lovan and Acorn gang leader Marc Anthony C[h]andler a day or two later. Lovan reportedly told C[h]andler, "Get rid of all your mitts. I got this straight from the head." The call was a warning that the "mitts" (phones) were tapped. "Head" Edgerly knew about the wiretaps because as city administrator she would sign off on officer overtime to monitor wiretaps during Operation Nutcracker." Other related acts of Corruption:
    • Two years ago (2006), Edgerly and Assistant City Administrator Cheryl Thompson showed up and made similar threats when police arrested Thompson's son, also a city employee, for disorderly conduct outside a bar in downtown Oakland. He remains a city employee. • Last year (2007), Debra Taylor-Johnson, a civilian police employee, was called into an administrative hearing by Police Department officials for vouching for a recently hired employee. The employee she endorsed was hired under an alias and had arrest warrants issued for identity theft and welfare fraud, authorities confirmed. But when officials recommended Taylor-Johnson's dismissal, Edgerly stepped in, overturned the decision and approved the expenditure to keep her friend employed. • Two years ago (2006), nothing was done when allegations of illegal kickbacks were raised against District Six City Councilwoman Desley Brooks, another of Edgerly's allies, after police investigators linked bank deposits made by the mother of one of Brooks' employees to several personal checks for $1,200 written to Brooks (exactly half the employee's paycheck). • Since former Mayor Jerry Brown appointed Edgerly four years ago (2004), she has changed hiring policies in the Police Department to the benefit of her daughter, a then-struggling police recruit. And last year, Edgerly ordered a change in the annual Fire Department recruiting call, with disastrous results. Some candidates were hand-picked by friends in the department while solid recruits, some of whom waited in line for days, were overlooked. The city had to toss out the process and start over. • The city's finance and management division includes nearly a dozen relatives of Edgerly and Thompson. One of Edgerly's sons works for the city's Office of Information Technology.
Something smells fishy here in Oakland ... and I don't mean the surrounding Bay area waters.
The Federal Bureau of Investigations In a federal grand jury subpoena dated Aug. 6 and issued to the Oakland city attorney's office, federal authorities asked for "timesheets, leave slips for sick leave, vacation, executive management or any other type leaves and pay stubs" for Oakland's top nonelected official and the five others from January 2004 to the present. In addition to Edgerly, the subpoena names her daughter, Erin Breckenridge, a police trainee, and her son, Frank Breckenridge, a city computer technician. It also names Edgerly's nephew, William Lovan, a city parking-meter repairman who was among 50 suspects arrested two months ago after a lengthy police investigation of a violent West Oakland street gang. The feds also asked for payroll records for former Assistant City Administrator Cheryl Thompson and her son, Damani Thompson, who works in the city's Finance Department. The subpoena, signed by the clerk of the U.S. District Court for Northern California, told city officials they could provide the information to FBI agents "in lieu of an appearance before the Grand Jury." (See: "FBI issues subpoena to Oakland officials." Chip Johnson, Chronicle Columnist. Friday, August 22, 2008)

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Top News Story!


RIALTO POLICE OFFICER
ORANGE COUNTY
DEFENSE ATTORNEY
TAKEN INTO CUSTODY


FEDERAL BRIBERY!


June 8, 2011

SANTA ANA, California – An Inland Empire police officer and an Orange County criminal defense attorney were taken into custody this morning by special agents with the FBI on federal bribery charges. Rialto Police Officer Aaron Scott Vigil, 41, of Highland, and criminal defense attorney Lawrence Anthony Witsoe, 67, of Mission Viejo, surrendered to the FBI after being named in a three-count indictment that was returned by a federal grand jury on June 1, 2011.

The indictment, which was unsealed this morning, alleges that Vigil, who served as a task force officer with the Drug Enforcement Administration, agreed to accept a $2,500 bribe in exchange for falsely telling the Orange County District Attorney’s Office that a criminal defendant being represented by Witsoe was a co-operator who had provided information to the DEA. The indictment charges both men with two counts – conspiracy and soliciting and accepting a bribe by a public official. Witsoe alone is charged with bribery of a public official. Both men are expected to be arraigned this afternoon in United States District Court.

According to the indictment, the bribery scheme began in the fall of 2009 when Witsoe told a client who was facing assault charges in Orange County Superior Court that for a sum of money – initially $1,000, but later increased to $2,500 – Witsoe could potentially get the assault case dismissed. Witsoe told the client that he could have a DEA agent call the Orange County District Attorney’s Office, explain that the client was a DEA informant, and ask the district attorney for consideration for the work the client had performed for the DEA. Thereafter, Vigil contacted the Orange County District Attorney’s Office on several occasions and explained that Witsoe’s client had provided reliable information regarding drug traffickers and that his cooperation led to the DEA seizing $110,000 in drug money, according to the indictment. When the district attorney dismissed the case, Witsoe instructed the client to wire the $2,500 to his client trust account, and Witsoe then wrote a check to the ex-wife of an associate of Vigil.

An indictment contains allegations that a defendant has committed a crime. If they are convicted of the counts in which they are charged, Vigil faces a maximum statutory penalty of 20 years in federal prison, and Witsoe faces a maximum sentence of 35 years in prison.

The case against Vigil and Witsoe was investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, which received the full cooperation of the Orange County District Attorney’s Office.


Long-mired!




OPD ... ????!


Posted: 07/17/2011 12:00:00 AM PDT
Updated: 07/17/2011 04:44:12 PM PDT


Two inquiries into an Oakland police detective's questionable investigation of journalist Chauncey Bailey's 2007 murder were so flawed that commanders couldn't determine what happened and dropped efforts to fire him, legal documents show. Charges against Sgt. Derwin Longmire related to the Bailey case eventually led to determinations of "not sustained" -- meaning they couldn't be proved or disproved -- and he was never disciplined for that case, according to depositions in Longmire's federal discrimination lawsuit against the city of Oakland. But police commanders didn't tell Longmire of their decision not to fire him while he remained on paid leave for five additional months, a period he claims was unfair and caused him stress, damage to his reputation and anxiety over how he would support his family if he lost his job.

The revelations contained in the depositions provide the clearest picture to date of the Oakland Police Department's handling of the controversy surrounding Longmire and his alleged ties to Yusuf Bey IV, convicted last month of ordering Bailey's murder. But the picture remains incomplete, because many details of the department's inquiries still have not been made public. The depositions themselves provide only a sketch of a detective whose supervisors clearly suspected him of malfeasance. Assistant Chief Howard Jordan, a defendant in the suit, said in a deposition that Longmire was not told of the determination because he was under a separate internal investigation for sloppy work in 10 other, unrelated homicide cases -- charges that were found to be true and eventually resulted in a six-day unpaid suspension.

Longmire (pictured left) argues that the department was trying to get him to sign an agreement that he wouldn't sue before he returned to work, which he rejected. He returned to work in December 2009 and is now assigned to the patrol division. The lawsuit claims he was a victim of racial discrimination; that his First Amendment rights were violated through retaliation against him for complaining about violations that occurred during the probe; and that police managers leaked information of the probe to the media in violation of state law and Longmire's privacy rights. He filed a separate suit this month in state court also containing a First Amendment claim, as well as a claim that he was discriminated against because police officials thought he was a Black Muslim, which he said he wasn't.

He was accused of compromising the Bailey investigation because of his relationship with Bey IV, the former Your Black Muslim Bakery leader who now awaits sentencing to life in prison without parole eligibility. Both the city's consultant and the state Department of Justice concluded Longmire compromised the case, but police commanders testified their reports were sloppy and incomplete, according to the depositions made public by media sources. Neither report has been released.

Jordan testified that Internal Affairs Lt. Sean Whent -- also a defendant in the lawsuit -- told him the reports were flawed but contained enough evidence to uphold firing Longmire. Whent testified in his deposition, and wrote in an April 2009 memo, that the decision was Jordan's.

In his own deposition, Longmire said Jordan has a deep bias against him and wanted him fired to advance his own career. Longmire also insisted he did nothing wrong in the Bailey case and didn't have an inappropriate relationship with Bey IV. A departmentwide gag order in effect for more than three years meant "I couldn't say anything in my own defense," Longmire said in his deposition.

The gag order is now gone, but Longmire declined to be interviewed for this story, as did lawyers in the Oakland City Attorney's office who represent the city and police commanders. Longmire testified that he has suffered a "a tremendous cost of respect" and likely has lost out on a chance at a post-retirement job as a District Attorney's Office inspector, which he estimated would have paid him $600,000 in his first five years. He is seeking unspecified damages.

"My name is an absolute lightning rod now," he said in his deposition. "I am not an obscure figure. I am in the community both where I live and where I work. So people recognize and see me."

Rumors swirled for years within the department that Longmire had too-friendly ties to the Bey family and the bakery. Still, former homicide unit commander Erise Joyner has steadfastly stood by his call to have Longmire investigate the Aug. 2, 2007, slaying of Bailey, the Oakland Post's editor, which almost immediately was tied to the bakery.

Devaughndre Broussard, a bakery follower, confessed to the killing only after Longmire put him in a room alone with Bey IV for a seven-minute unrecorded conversation, during which he later claimed Bey IV ordered him to take sole blame for the killing. Broussard later recanted and then admitted killing Bailey on the order of Bey IV. He struck a deal for a 25-year prison term in exchange for testifying against Bey IV and bakery member Antoine Mackey. After Broussard's confession, efforts to tie Bey IV to the slaying slowed. In the depositions, Joyner testified that then-District Attorney Tom Orloff twice rejected efforts to charge Bey IV in the killing because he was facing separate kidnapping and torture charges that carried a mandatory life sentence. Bey IV, meanwhile, was repeatedly recorded in jail saying that Longmire was protecting him. Orloff didn't return a call seeking comment for this story.

In April 2008, the detective assigned to the torture case, Jesse Grant, complained to internal affairs that Longmire had interfered in his investigation. He said Longmire had spoken to his suspects without his permission and tried to get bakery computers that had been seized returned to the Beys. Longmire said in his deposition that he didn't even know a kidnapping had occurred or that Bey IV was a suspect. Grant, he said, "has a problem with Black males," which Longmire argued was a possible motive for the complaint against him. He went on to testify that Grant told staff at the District Attorney's Office that he was a Black Muslim. Grant, now a Berkeley police officer, did not return a message seeking a response.

Others in the department also voiced concern that Longmire was widely believed to be a Black Muslim and bakery associate. Among them, Whent and Deputy Chief Jeffrey Israel testified, was intelligence unit Officer Andre Rachal, the department's expert on the bakery. Longmire testified that when he was Rachal's intelligence unit supervisor, Rachal wouldn't give him information on the bakery because of that concern. That perception, Longmire claimed, was because of his race, patronage of the bakery and the fact he often wore a bow tie -- often associated with Black Muslims -- to work. But that, he said, was simply a fashion choice, because he thought bow ties made him appear distinguished.

Trying to preserve a perception of objectivity, the department farmed out its internal affairs investigation of Longmire to Wendell "Pete" France, a former Baltimore police commander and internal affairs consultant. The California Department of Justice, at the request of then-Mayor Ron Dellums, ran a simultaneous, separate probe. Both reports arrived scant days before a deadline set by state law -- one year after Grant's complaint -- by which the top brass had to decide whether to discipline Longmire. The depositions show a widespread dissatisfaction with the reports and no time to ask the authors to strengthen them.

Israel testified that France's report had "no discussion and analysis, no credibility assessments. Pete France came to a conclusion that is simply not supported. "... He didn't follow up with what I thought were some pretty loose ends that needed to be followed up on." Joyner, who as Longmire's supervisor was also a subject of the probes, was more blunt about France. He testified that he "just thought it was kind of ironic that an individual who was investigating a poor investigation by Longmire did even a more poor investigation himself."

France, now a Maryland prison commissioner, wrote in an email he has "no authorization to release any documents, nor do I have an interest in responding" to the depositions. The state Department of Justice in 2009 said it stood by its report; a spokeswoman this week declined to comment, calling it "a personnel issue."

Yet, despite criticism of the reports, Jordan quickly placed Longmire on paid suspension and began the process of firing him. Jordan also approved France's finding that Longmire had disobeyed Joyner's order to document all contacts with bakery members; Joyner testified that he provided computer records showing Longmire's compliance with that order.

Three months after Jordan suspended Longmire, Capt. Anthony Toribio conducted a hearing at which Longmire could respond to the allegations. Toribio within days of the hearing told Jordan he didn't believe the charges against Longmire could be sustained, a recommendation that usually would end such a case and let the subject return to work. Still, Longmire was kept on leave -- and in the dark about Toribio's recommendation -- for five more months.

Longmire Testifies!


April 14, 2011



OAKLAND — The lead police investigator into the shooting death of journalist Chauncey Bailey explained publicly for the first time Thursday why he did not record what later came to be seen as a crucial, private meeting between two men being questioned in connection with the 2007 killing.

Testifying in Bailey’s murder trial, Oakland Police Sgt. Derwin Longmire said he had no way of secretly recording the six-minute meeting between the prime suspect in the killing, Devaunghdre Broussard, and Yusuf Bey IV, the leader of Your Black Muslim Bakery who Broussard considered his spiritual leader.

Broussard, Longmire said, “had asked for privacy. It didn’t seem reasonable to me to leave a recording device.”

The police substation where Broussard and Bey IV were being interrogated wasn’t equipped with built-in recording devices, Longmire testified, adding that if he had left a recorder in plain sight it would have been as if he were in room listening to the conversation.

After Bey IV emerged from the meeting, Broussard told investigators he acted alone when he shot Bailey as the Oakland Post editor walked to work on the morning of Aug. 2, 2007. Broussard now says Bey IV ordered the killing to stop Bailey from writing an article about the bakery’s financial trouble, and that Bey IV used the private meeting to pressure him to take the blame, saying the moment was a test from God.

That explanation was one of the few things Longmire talked about in his long-anticipated appearance in Bey IV and co-defendant Antoine Mackey’s triple murder case. Bey IV and Mackey have pleaded not guilty to murder charges in connection with Bailey’s death and the unrelated shooting deaths of two other men, Odell Roberson and Michael Wills, in summer 2007.

Longmire’s testimony was cut short following a 30-minute conference in Judge Thomas Reardon’s chambers after Bey IV’s lawyer, Gene Peretti, objected to a line of questioning from prosecutor Melissa Krum.

Krum asked Longmire about a conversation about the bakery he had in 2003 with then Police Chief Richard Word. Peretti claimed the question lacked relevance to the charges against Bey IV, and the judge upheld the objection after meeting with attorneys in his chambers.

Reardon did not explain in open court why he upheld the objection.

According to documents obtained by the Chauncey Bailey Project, Longmire told Word in 2003 that the bakery was a criminal enterprise and urged that action be taken to shut it down. The documents describe Word declining to act on the advice and telling Longmire to work on other investigations.

After the private hearing with the judge, Krum quickly changed directions in her questioning and finished within 10 minutes. Peretti and Mackey’s lawyer, Gary Sirbu, crossed-examined Longmire for a few minutes and the court session ended more than an hour early because Krum had no other witnesses ready to testify, anticipating a longer session with Longmire.

Much of Longmire’s testimony focused on how he came to know Bey IV and his knowledge of the bakery. Longmire said he met Bey IV in November 2005 when Bey IV showed up at a crime scene where a man had died in police custody after choking on a bag of drugs he tried to swallow.

Bakery members had videotaped the encounter, and the recording was later seized during a raid on the bakery. On the recording, which Krum played it for the jury, Bey IV could be heard called police officers “white devils” as Longmire tried to calm him.

Longmire said he told Bey IV, whose older brother Antar had recently been murdered, that he ought to be home comforting his mother and running the bakery, not “confronting police about matters he knew very little.”

Longmire also said that the first lead that the bakery was linked to Bailey’s death came from Post publisher Paul Cobb, who he said called police shortly after the shooting and said that Bailey was working on a story about the long-standing black empowerment organization.

Under cross examination by Sirbu, Longmire also denied charges from Broussard, who said Longmire grabbed and roughly squeezed his leg while interrogating him and also denied his requests for a lawyer.

Neither Peretti nor Sirbu asked Longmire any questions about his handling of the case, which lead to a state justice department investigation in 2009 and a finding that Longmire “intentionally compromised” the investigation because he was friends with Bey IV. Longmire’s lawyers have vigorously denied those claims and successfully fought Oakland Police Department attempts to dismiss Longmire.

A state justice department official, John Porbanic, led the 2009 investigation. A police internal affairs investigation reached the same conclusion. Longmire’s lawyer, Michael Rains, got the department to back down after writing a blistering critique of the state investigation, calling it inept.

The justice department then issued a written statement saying that its findings were supported by facts and standing behind Porbanic. A justice department spokesman, Jim Finefrock, said in an email Thursday the department had no comment on whether that position has changed.

Longmire sued the Oakland Police Department last year in federal court, claiming that his rights were violated, in part because a gag order prohibited him from speaking publicly about the Bailey case. All but one of his claims were thrown out. Court records show the suit has been sent to a mediator for possible settlement.

The trial resumes Monday morning. Krum said Wednesday that she has about 40 witnesses left to testify.

Lawsuit: Officers claims tossed by Judge!


July 2, 2010

A federal judge has dismissed most of a civil-rights lawsuit filed by the former Oakland homicide detective who led the highly criticized investigation of journalist Chauncey Bailey's 2007 slaying. Sgt. Derwin Longmire had claimed in his April lawsuit that the Oakland Police Department, Assistant Chief Howard Jordan and Internal Affairs Division Lt. Sean Whent violated his constitutional rights and ruined his reputation by investigating his conduct and allowing information leaks while forbidding him from clearing his own name. U.S. District Judge Jeffrey White this week ruled Longmire's case is full of holes and can't be sustained by the facts presented in the complaint. He dismissed all but one of Longmire's claims, allowing Longmire the right to amend and refile his case on the others. City Attorney John Russo and Longmire's lawyers couldn't immediately be reached for comment.

Bailey was editor of the Oakland Post when he was shot to death Aug. 2, 2007. The next day, police raided Your Black Muslim Bakery on warrants from a separate investigation and found the shotgun used to kill Bailey. Hours later, Longmire let former bakery CEO Yusuf Bey IV and bakery handyman Devaughndre Broussard, both of whom were in custody, have a seven-minute, unrecorded conversation. Broussard then confessed to killing Bailey but later recanted. Broussard ultimately admitted to prosecutors in April 2009 that he killed Bailey but said he was ordered to do so by Bey IV. The Alameda County District Attorney's Office now has charged Bey IV and Antoine Mackey, a bakery associate, with Bailey's slaying and two other killings.

Longmire came under fire from critics for having too close of a relationship to Bey IV as he investigated Bailey's death. He had interceded in Bey IV's criminal cases before, and the two had numerous telephone conversations while Bey IV was in jail, including calls omitted from Longmire's case notes. White noted in his ruling this week that the first internal investigation found Longmire had compromised the Bailey case, and so he was suspended and put on paid administrative leave in April 2009. Longmire complained that the internal investigation had been faulty, and the city responded with an offer that he return to work in exchange for agreeing not to sue the city. Longmire refused to sign the release, and later was ordered to return to work and was served with a proposed 20-day suspension for alleged misconduct related to a second internal investigation of his handling of other homicide cases. Longmire received no discipline for his conduct in the Bailey case and now works as a sergeant in the patrol division, where he was transferred from homicide before he was put on leave.

In his lawsuit, Longmire claimed he was retaliated against for exercising his First Amendment free-speech rights by writing to the department in March 2009 to complain about the internal affairs officer investigating him. White wrote the lawsuit doesn't establish that the letter was "constitutionally protected as opposed to a mere internal personnel grievance." Longmire also claimed Jordan and Whent violated his rights by "ratifying" leaks to the press of confidential information about Longmire's case, doing nothing to investigate those leaks but imposing a gag order to keep him from saying anything publicly to clear his name. This, too, doesn't rise to the level of a First Amendment claim, White ruled. Longmire had claimed he was investigated unfairly as a result of his perceived membership in or association with Your Black Muslim Bakery and its religious affiliation, even though he's a Christian.

But the judge said Longmire presented no claim that the city or police administrators interfered with his actual, Christian faith, or even with his hypothetical embrace of the Black Muslim faith. Anyway, White wrote, Longmire presented no precedent to show such a claim can be based on discrimination against a misperceived religious affiliation. Nor does he have a case in claiming infringement of his right to association with a group he was mistakenly associated with, White wrote: He can't claim his rights to associate with the bakery were infringed if he never actually associated with it anyway. Longmire had claimed he was deprived of his right to privacy under the Fourth and Ninth Amendments by the information leaks about the internal affairs investigation into his activities. "However, the complaint does not allege that the press improperly received information about Plaintiff's personnel records," White wrote. "The current complaint fails to state the type or content of the information disclosed in the leaks."

White wrote that Longmire claimed he was denied due process of law yet concedes he wasn't disciplined for his conduct, so there's no basis to claim he was deprived of property or liberty. "Although Plaintiff pleads elsewhere that he suffered damage to his reputation, such injury is not sufficient to support a claim for violation of due process." White did not dismiss Longmire's claim that he was denied equal protection of the law under the Fourteenth Amendment because the department's investigations of him were racially discriminatory. The judge said case law requires that the court allow such a claim to proceed.

Jury: Your Black Muslim Bakery follower guilty in kidnapping-torture case!


April 7, 2010

OAKLAND — A jury Wednesday morning convicted a follower of the defunct Your Black Muslim Bakery on six felony charges of kidnapping two women at gunpoint and torturing one of them in a failed scheme to steal drug money and use it to save the bakery from financial ruin.

Richard Lewis, 26, a former star football player at San Francisco's Galileo Academy, now faces a sentence of life in prison without the possibility of parole. He was part of an inner circle that jailed bakery leader Yusuf Bey IV once referred to in a conversation while in jail as his "San Francisco muscle."

The jury began deliberations Monday morning. Lewis testified last week that he had nothing to do with the May 17, 2007 crime and insisted that two of Bey IV's half brothers who testified against him were lying in order to frame him and divert responsibility for themselves.

Both Joshua Bey and Yusuf Bey V, who have pleaded guilty to lesser charges and agreed to testify in exchange for sentences of three and 10 years respectively, told jurors that Lewis was involved in the kidnapping.

Prosecutor Christopher Lamiero also told the jurors that testing, although not conclusively linking Lewis to the crime, showed that Lewis could not be excluded as the source of DNA found on a large knife used to cut the victim.

The victim, a woman in her forties, testified that she was handcuffed, had a garbage bag placed over her head and was beaten as her attackers demanded to know where a drug dealer —from whom she had bought cocaine — kept his money. A police officer on routine patrol rescued the woman. Bey IV and another defendant, Tamon Halfin, will be tried separately in the kidnapping case. Bey IV will first face triple-murder charges in May for allegedly ordering Oakland journalist Chauncey Bailey and two other men killed in the summer of 2007.


Longmire Sues!


April 7, 2010

OAKLAND — Oakland police Sgt. Derwin Longmire (pictured above, center) the former homicide detective who led the highly criticized investigation of journalist Chauncey Bailey's 2007 death, filed a lawsuit against the city Wednesday, claiming high-level police commanders tarnished his reputation. "I want to restore my good name," Longmire said. "My reputation has been slandered and very nearly destroyed. And I need an opportunity, a venue, in which to speak the truth." The federal civil rights lawsuit claims the department undertook a biased internal investigation to "confirm" the beliefs of Assistant Chief Howard Jordan and Acting Capt. Sean Whent, head of the Internal Affairs Division, that Longmire "compromised the Bailey investigation." It further claims a California Department of Justice investigation relied on Jordan and Whent to provide background information and also was biased. Police Department leaks to the media — including The Chauncey Bailey Project, the Oakland Tribune and the San Francisco Chronicle — damaged Longmire's reputation, the lawsuit said. "I live every day with the shadow of this hanging over me," Longmire said, adding that he lives with "anxiety" and "anguish" in his home life as well as at work. The lawsuit asks for unspecified monetary damages and for injunctive relief. Alex Katz, a spokesman for City Attorney John Russo, said Russo's office wouldn't comment because it has not reviewed the lawsuit. The Police Department did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Longmire was placed on paid administrative leave in April 2009, and the department subsequently moved to fire him on allegations he compromised the Bailey investigation and was insubordinate. The department ultimately sent Longmire back to work after a disciplinary hearing that did not go well for the city, according to department sources familiar with the matter. Longmire is working as a sergeant in the patrol division, where he transferred from homicide before he was put on leave. He still is facing the possibility of much lesser discipline on matters unrelated to the Bailey case, but he and his lawyer declined to discuss those issues Wednesday.

Chauncey Bailey was editor of the Oakland Post when he was shot to death Aug. 2, 2007. The day after Bailey's slaying, police raided Your Black Muslim Bakery on warrants from a separate investigation of the bakery. They found the shotgun used to kill Bailey, and, hours later, Longmire let former bakery CEO Yusuf Bey IV and bakery handyman Devaughndre Broussard have a seven-minute, unrecorded conversation. Broussard then confessed to killing Bailey but later recanted.

Broussard then admitted to prosecutors in April 2009 that he killed Bailey but said he was ordered to do so by Bey IV. The Alameda County District Attorney's Office is charging Bey IV and Antoine Mackey, a bakery associate, with Bailey's slaying, as well. Longmire came under fire for having too close of a relationship to Bey IV as he investigated Bailey's death. The two had numerous telephone conversations while Bey IV was in jail, which were not included in Longmire's case notes.

Jordan, who served as acting police chief from March 1, 2009 until Oct. 19, 2009 last year, said after Longmire was put on leave that, in hindsight, he was not the right person for the case. "I thought (Longmire) was able to separate his relationship with the bakery and do his job," Jordan said April 30. "And I'm not sure about that right now." Longmire and his attorney said Wednesday that Longmire was — and continues to be — hampered by a gag order, preventing him from discussing the Bailey case publicly. Asked if he compromised the case, he said, "I did not, but I cannot speak any more on that because of the gag order that remains in place."

Sgt. Derwin Longmire


Article Last Updated: (recorded conversations between Longmire & Yusef Bey, IV) 09/04/2009 04:30:18 PM PDT

By Thomas Peele, Bob Butler and Mary Fricker, The Chauncey Bailey Project.
Article Last Updated: 10/27/2008 09:28:18 AM PDT

OAKLAND - Well before the August 2007 killing of journalist Chauncey Bailey, detective Sgt. Derwin Longmire twice interfered in felony investigations of former Your Black Muslim Bakery leader Yusuf Bey IV, according to police documents obtained and interviews conducted during a yearlong investigation by the Chauncey Bailey Project. In both cases, Bey IV was charged with crimes despite Longmire's actions.

In one, he continued to talk to Bey IV about one case after an investigator told him not to, according to police documents. In the other case, he tried to get evidence returned to the Bey family before it could be analyzed, said law enforcement sources familiar with the situation.

Police internal affairs detectives are now investigating Longmire's relationship with Bey IV and his work on the Bailey slaying case.

Longmire did not respond to multiple requests for an interview. Police Chief Wayne Tucker and Assistant Chief Howard Jordan rejected interview requests. Jordan and homicide unit commander Lt. Ersie Joyner have both praised Longmire in past interviews, calling him professional and ethical.

A janitor and dishwasher at the former bakery, Devaughndre Broussard, is the only person charged in Bailey's Aug. 2, 2007, killing. Longmire case notes seemingly ignore evidence linking Bey IV to a role in the killing, including data from a tracking device and cell phone records, according to a copy of those case notes that the Bailey Project obtained.

The detective's actions in the other cases in turn "raise lots of questions as to his neutrality his impartiality" in the Bailey investigation, and "whether or not he had some sort of agenda that favored the people who ran the bakery," said Peter Keane, a former San Francisco police commissioner and dean emeritus of Golden Gate University School of Law. In November 2005, when Bey IV was under investigation in the vandalism and robbery of two North Oakland liquor stores, Longmire made repeated incursions into the case even after the case's lead investigator admonished him.

He interfered in another case involving Bey IV in June 2007, when the bakery leader was under investigation by other detectives on suspicion that he led four of his followers in the kidnapping and torture of two women. After Bey IV's Aug. 3, 2007, arrest in that case, he continued to interfere in it.

"Just to (put) yourself into someone else's case without their awareness, knowledge and approval, that's a violation of (police) protocol. You just don't do that," said Thomas Nolan, a retired Boston police lieutenant who now teaches criminology at Boston University.

Keane said Longmire took on "roles that were far different from just the straightforward, professional role of an investigator impartially investigating criminal activity. He seemed - from what we can see - to have other agendas. I think he's going to have to speak to those at some point."

The liquor store

The night before Thanksgiving in 2005, shortly after he took control of the bakery after the killing of his older brother, Antar Bey, 20-year-old Yusuf Bey IV took his first public action as a leader of an institution that had for more than 30 years symbolized African-American self-reliance and militancy.

He led 10 men in suits and bow ties into two North Oakland liquor stores where they broke open beer coolers with baseball bats and smashed bottles of whiskey and other spirits on the floor.

A security camera at one of the stores taped the attack. The men also stole a sawed-off 12-gauge shotgun from one of the store clerks. It was the gun that 21 months later would be used to kill Chauncey Bailey.

As part of the liquor store investigation, Oakland police Detective Dominique Arotzarena launched an aggressive search, using confidential informants who had worked at the bakery, to identify people on the video, which was shown on several newscasts.

On Nov. 27 - four days after the attack - Arotzarena wrote in his case notes that Longmire approached him about the investigation.

"He advised me that the mother of Yusuf Bey IV called him. She wanted Longmire to call him about the case," Arotzarena wrote in his case notes. "Longmire asked me what he could tell Bey IV about the case.

"I told him not to reveal any details about the case, including the possibility of Bey (IV) being a suspect," Arotzarena wrote. But Longmire didn't heed the admonishment. An hour-and-a-half later, according to Arotzarena's notes, Longmire approached him again and said he'd had another call from Bey IV's mother, Daulet Bey. Arotzarena didn't write his response to the second approach. He declined to be interviewed for this story.

But the fact that he documented Longmire's uninvited entries into the case is telling, said Nolan, the retired Boston detective who reviewed the notes.

"Obviously, there's some kind of conflict that's being memorialized here by (Arotzarena.) Something occurred that torqued (him) off . particularly when he says, 'I asked him not to reveal any details of the case,' that's a red flag to me as a former cop. "It appears as though (Longmire's) colleagues for various reasons, don't trust him." Nolan said. With Bey IV captured on surveillance video leading the vandalism, why does Longmire "want to give him any kind of consideration, as far as getting hooked for it? It doesn't make sense," Nolan said.

On Nov. 28, Arotzarena was called to a meeting with then-Capt. Jeff Loman, head of the criminal investigations division, Deputy Chief Howard Jordan and Officer Anthony Rachal. Loman told Arotzarena that Bey IV was "coming to the police department (the next day). Bey (IV) wanted to talk to the police about the vandalism," according to Arotzarena's notes. The next morning, then-Alameda Superior Court Judge Jacqueline Tabor signed warrants for the arrest of Bey IV and five others at Arotzarena's request.

Before Arotzarena could do anything with the warrants, Loman met with him again. Loman "advised me that if Bey (IV) was completely forthcoming with information, we were to release him pending review of the case with" the district attorney's office, Arotzarena wrote in his case notes.

Loman, a friend of Longmire's, did not respond to requests for an interview. Homicide unit commander Lt. Ersie Joyner described Loman in April as knowing people at the bakery much the same way Longmire did, as part of the department's efforts to get to know the community.

Shortly after Loman told Arotzarena not to arrest Bey IV, Bey IV showed up at police headquarters with Longmire, according to Arotzarena's case notes.

"I never asked Bey (IV) to come down to the police department during this investigation, Arotzarena wrote. "He came down to meet with Longmire."

The warrants were "not made public by this police department or me. Longmire organized this visit."

Bey IV immediately asked for a lawyer. It is unclear how he knew there was a warrant for his arrest.

"I never spoke to Bey (IV) nor told him that he was under arrest," Arotzarena wrote. Longmire's conduct was clearly outside of police protocol and raises serious questions about his ethics, Keane said.

"His getting involved in extraneous cases when his fellow officers and colleagues didn't want him involved raises some big questions" Keane said.

UC Berkeley law professor Charles Weisselberg said what is significant is that with Longmire arranging for Bey IV to come to the police station, Arotzarena lost control of the case.

A detective, he said, wants to be in charge of all aspects of an investigation, especially when a suspect is questioned and arrested. Because Bey IV came in with Longmire to surrender, Arotzarena "no longer had control of when (he) was going to arrest or have first contact with Bey IV."

Arotzarena "was very specific in stating that he had never asked for Bey IV to come down to the police department," Weisselberg said.

"What jumps out at me is that the investigating officer thought it was sufficiently significant or serious to include it in the case notes," Nolan said. Detectives, he said, rarely criticize colleagues in writing.

Bey IV pleaded no contest to eight felony charges in the liquor store case on July 30and is to be sentenced next year.

The kidnapping case

In spring 2007, Bey IV and four of his followers - Tamon Halfin, Richard Lewis and his half-brothers, Yusuf Bey V and Joshua Bey - are accused of kidnapping two women at gunpoint by posing as police officers and stopping their car on Interstate 580. Police say the five took the victims to an abandoned East Oakland house and tortured one of them in an attempt to extort money.

In testimony during a preliminary examination Jan. 24, one of the women described a brutal beating as she was tied to a chair, a bag over her head. She said the attackers beat her so hard she thought she'd been shot and that they threatened to violate her with a hot curling iron.

A police officer on routine patrol happened on the scene and rescued the women. Police say the five suspects escaped, but they left two cars and a cell phone at the scene. During the next several days, Joshua Bey and another follower of Yusuf Bey IV's each reported one of the cars as stolen. Police didn't buy the claims.

Within a few days, detectives asked Joshua Bey and the other follower, Kahlil Raheem, to come in voluntarily give statements about the stolen cars. The idea was to lock the two into statements that detectives already suspected were false, said an Oakland detective with knowledge of the situation.

Joshua Bey and Raheem came in at separate times. Each time, Longmire showed up and briefly entered the interrogation room where the suspect was being kept. Longmire was uninvolved in the case and did not speak to the investigative detectives first, said the Oakland detective.

It is unknown what, if anything, was said. Joshua Bey on Feb. 1 pleaded guilty to one count of kidnapping and is scheduled to testify against the others at a Superior Court trial in exchange for a reduced sentence. Raheem, who was also charged in the liquor store case, pleaded no contest in July to one count of vandalism. In exchange for a sentence of probation, he testified against the kidnapping defendants at their preliminary hearing.

Both Joshua Bey and Raheem, in brief interviews with the Bailey Project, said they didn't recall Longmire speaking to them.

When the bakery was raided Aug. 3, among the items seized were several computers. Police suspected they contained evidence of other crimes. Bey IV is also charged in a separate case with real estate fraud, including using false identities to apply for mortgages in June 2006.

Before those computers could be searched, law enforcement officials learned that Longmire was trying to get them returned to the Bey family.

Internal affairs investigators are looking at Longmire's attempt to have those computers returned. The situation was serious enough that extra provisions were taken to keep the computers safeguarded as evidence, officials said.

The Bailey Project also has learned that Longmire worked to discredit the detective who worked on the kidnapping case and was in line to join the homicide unit. That detective, Jesse Grant, left the Oakland Police Department earlier this year, taking a job with the Berkeley Police Department.

He is described by some members of law enforcement who know him as an outstanding detective about to be promoted to sergeant in Oakland at the time of his departure.

Grant declined to be interviewed. The detective said that Grant pointed out several times that he was finding evidence in the kidnapping case that was related to the Bailey case. But Longmire ignored him, the detective said, and worked to derail Grant's career in the Oakland Police Department. Grant "was blacklisted for doing the right thing," the Oakland detective with knowledge of the situation said. "He's an excellent investigator, he did a great job."

Bey IV remains incarcerated without bail at Santa Rita Jail in Dublin awaiting trial in the kidnapping case. He is also being held in nine other criminal cases, including four felonies in Alameda County, a felony assault case in San Francisco, a gun possession case in Solano County and a stolen vehicle case in Contra Costa County, according to a summary prepared in August by Alameda County Deputy District Attorney Scott Patton.

Thomas Peele is an investigative reporter for the Bay Area News Group. Bob Butler and Mary Fricker are independent journalists. Reach them at Tpeele@bayareanewsgroip.com", bobbutler7@comcast.net", and maryfricker@hughes.net"

The following reporters contributed to this story: Josh Richman of the Bay Area News Group, Will Evans of The Center for Investigative Reporting, Andrew Palma of San Francisco State University, Roland De Wolk of KTVU-TV, independent journalists Ethan Harp, Ronnie Cohen, G.W. Schultz, and Gene Durnell and student intern Marguerite Davenport.